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Thread: What have you watched lately?

  1. #501
    Cuddly little misanthropic hate machine
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Location: 4 doors down, bad side of town
    Watched This Is Spinal Tap again tonight. This movie is such a fucking classic- it really kinda provides an honest glimpse into the weird goofiness that was 70s and 80s metal.

    The irony is that while everyone points at the amps that go up to 11 as the funniest part of the movie, for me it's the bit where Nigel is playing this heartachingly beautiful piano piece and goes on about how it's part of a suite he's working on and it'll have horn pieces and shit like that and when asked what it's called, he says "Lick My Love Pump."

  2. #502
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2000
    Location: sup
    I don't know if everyone thought it was the funniest scene, rather that it was just an inherently quotable and immediately recognisable one. I remember the Lick My Love Pump bit vividly.

  3. #503
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2004
    Location: Back Home
    "Shit sandwich"


    Can they even print that?



    Honestly, that film has so many memorable moments. I think the "all the way up to 11, right acoss the board" has stuck with people because it seems to stretch more widely across rock music posturing and popular-musician-ignorance in more general terms, also reflecting the importance to rock musicians of their gear and semi-mythical qualities of guitars and amp setups, etc.

  4. #504
    member
    Registered: Jun 2006
    Location: canaustralia
    The guitar you can't touch/look at/think about was always a highlight for me. The extended scenes on the dvd I watched were fascinating, the must have filmed a huge amount of material for this film.

  5. #505
    Still Subjective
    Registered: Dec 1999
    Location: Europops
    Yeah, that was my fav bit. At first he's alright about it but then gets wound up by the thought of someone else looking at and finally decides even looking at it is a no no. But it's his behaviours in that scene that make it.

    Incidentally, BBC iPlayer's volume goes up to 11. I'm sure this is no coincidence.

  6. #506
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    Quote Originally Posted by Scots Taffer View Post
    Finally saw The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford and agree that it was a bit of a masterstroke. A vivid western without all the romanticising; gone are deep brooding looks off into the horizon, grizzled men of the west bearing down on each other with guns in tense standoffs, villains and heroes settling their disagreements the ol' fashioned way. Instead this was a portrait of a man with a double life, a family man and a cold blooded murderer who earned a living robbing innocent people, killing those who hinted at betrayal by shooting them unawares in the dark, and suspicious of everyone. Pitt's work is fine but truly Casey Affleck stole the show as the wormy and creepy Bob Ford whose hero worship ran too deep and turned into poison. It was really uniquely directed too, a mix of biopic, drama and documentary.
    Glad you enjoyed this. It's one of my favourite films of the last five years, not least because of the beautiful acting. I agree that Affleck is brilliant, although I've very much enjoyed watching Brad Pitt grow as an actor over the last couple of years. I'm also a big fan of Sam Rockwell's work in this one, especially his character's development after Jesse James' death. And Nick Cave and Warren Ellis' music fits perfectly IMO.

    Edit: Watched Sympathy for Mr Vengeance yesterday. I've greatly enjoyed Chan-wook Park's Vengeance trilogy - the first I saw was Oldboy, then Lady Vengeance and liked them both a lot. Mr Vengeance was good as well, but if I'd seen it first I wouldn't necessarily have run out to get the other two; it's got some brilliant stylistic choices, but the story is constructed in a way that lacks the elegance of the other two films, as far as I'm concerned. I felt less engaged, perhaps mainly because the characters were too much subordinate to the plot, becoming relatively flat. Still a good film, mind you, but not the sucker punch that Oldboy and Lady Vengeance were.
    Last edited by Thirith; 7th Dec 2009 at 03:58.

  7. #507
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2000
    Location: sup
    Yeah, though the passage of time after his death is dealt with briefly you really get a sense of Rockwell's character going through the pain and guilt of his brother's cowardice - though to be fair, he was already agonising over it before it happened. Rockwell's been one of my favourite character actors since the late 90s. The cinematography was amazing too.

  8. #508
    member
    Registered: Jun 2006
    Location: canaustralia
    Definitely agree on Jesse James, the cinematography was something else altogether, the train robbery scene is not something I'm going to forget for a long time. The only problem I had with the movie was the sheer volume of characters introduced in a short period of time. It may have been that I just wasn't attentive enough when I saw it, but I really struggled to keep up with the ties between the characters for the first half of the movie, until obviously it really only dealt with a handful. Who would have thought that metallophones would have worked so well on the score for a period piece, an inspired soundtrack.

  9. #509
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    God, yes, the cinematography is to die for. The lead-up to the raid on the train, with the train's lights shining through the trees, especially when combined with the music.

    I should really take the rest of the day off, go home and watch the film. (I would have enough overtime accumulated to do that...)

    Concerning Rockwell's performance, I think it's the bits where he acts the part of Jesse James in that horrible stage version, and his performance becomes more and more bitter. That's what sticks in my mind most.

    Edit: ercles: concerning the number of characters, I watched the film just around the time that my girlfriend and me were watching Deadwood. Compared to that, The Assassination of Jesse James is quite tiny. The film definitely feels like an adaptation of a novel, though, in terms of its language, pace and definitely its cast of characters. Has anyone here read the novel?

    The first time I noticed Rockwell as an actor to look out for was in Confessions of a Dangerous Mind. Charlie Kaufman may not like that film, but I think it's definitely a small gem. (And it's got the best Damon/Pitt cameo ever.)
    Last edited by Thirith; 7th Dec 2009 at 04:47.

  10. #510
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2000
    Location: sup
    He first popped up on my radar with his work as "Guy" (read, red shirt) in Galaxy Quest and in the same year I barely recognised him when he did a brilliant turn in The Green Mile. After that I watched out for him... and yes, his transformation through the plays was pretty nicely done.

    Last point on Jesse and "too many characters" - for me, I was left slightly confused from the point when the gang started referencing someone who we hadn't met. I struggled to think back to the first scene at the camp to determine if I'd missed out any names or faces, but no, they kept referring to a Jim Cummins and I continued to feel a tiny bit lost not knowing who they were talking about.

  11. #511
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2000
    Location: sup

    dbl pst

    I saw A Serious Man at the cinema last night in my last gasp rush at everything 2009 (music and movies - I listened to Muse's album again on the way out and listened to Alice Chains on the way back) ahead of the two best threads in the Christmas tradition by Uncle Stitch and Papa Scots.

    Wow, it's like they decided to make a smaller and more personal film that somehow manages to be bleaker than No Country.

    It was fucking phenomenal.

    In the next few days I aim to plough through the following:
    - The Hurt Locker
    - Up
    - Public Enemies
    - Inglorious Basterds
    - Gomorrah
    - Drag Me To Hell

  12. #512
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2002
    Location: Freeland, WA
    Yeah, A Serious Man got on my list for a good reason. It's one of those films that (at least for me) actually gets BETTER once I've walked away from it. Eagerly looking forward to a re-watch.

    Also, reading a section of the script (for reference when discussing the key scene in the film) makes one realize just how damn fun the writing is.

  13. #513
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2000
    Location: sup
    Their track record is now starting to get ridiculous, either stellar or solid output on a near yearly basis for 3 years running? Their back catalogue?

  14. #514
    Administrator
    Registered: Oct 2000
    Location: Athens of the North
    They certainly seem to know how to do more than just tell a story - they bring the audience along too. I enjoyed "Burn After Reading" which although not a perfect film still had their style throughout. I haven't seen "A serious man" yet but it's definitely on my list.

    On an almost completely different level I've recently been enjoying working my way back through episodes of Reboot. Although originally a kid's TV series it had the audacity to actually develop both the characters and the situation with some brilliant episodes. It may be getting a bit long in the tooth now, but it still seems watchable (particularly as sites such as this exist).

  15. #515
    Cuddly little misanthropic hate machine
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Location: 4 doors down, bad side of town
    Rewatched Diary of the Dead the other night. I liked it better the second time 'round. It's clear that Romero was trying to go back to the indie film spirit that he got his start in. I really honestly hope he keeps up that desperate, confused atmosphere that he was going for in the next film.

  16. #516
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2001
    Location: Tatry Mountains, Poland
    The International

    I thought it is going to be some boring and stupid thriller. But it was not.

  17. #517
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: Lost in transit.
    A Serious Man.

    (I adore that trailer.)

    I'm going to need some time to digest this one. I definitely enjoyed it, but it's so steeped in a particular subculture -- or at least the Coens' warped vision of it -- I felt like half the movie went over my head.

  18. #518
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2002
    Location: Freeland, WA
    I actually think the Jew culture is a means of conveyance and not the point in and of itself - which is to say, being thoroughly knowledgeable of Judaism would help significantly with the prologue but wouldn't significantly increase understanding of the rest of the film. Apparently it was widely seen by the Jewish community in Chicago and a solid portion of them felt the film was anti-semetic, which as far as I'm concerned it absolutely moronic. But give anything involving Jews to a group of Jews and a good chunk will scream anti-Semetic.

    For instance, a good chunk would find the above comment...anti-semetic!

    P.S. Last time I use the obnoxious phrase "anti-semetic."

  19. #519
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: Lost in transit.
    It's not that I feel knowledge of Judaism per se would help me, but it feels like a very personal film, relating to stuff I have very little experience of, which makes it a bit hard to contextualize.

  20. #520
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2000
    Location: sup
    Quote Originally Posted by bukary View Post
    The International

    I thought it is going to be some boring and stupid thriller. But it was not.
    At the moment it's floating around my top 3 of '09. Very underrated imo. Thread is coming in ONE week. Giving Avatar a chance to hit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Morte View Post
    I'm going to need some time to digest this one. I definitely enjoyed it, but it's so steeped in a particular subculture -- or at least the Coens' warped vision of it -- I felt like half the movie went over my head.
    I think that their view on Judaism is comparable to most religions - embrace "mystery" and "God's will" when life shovels you shit and tragedy, follow ritual and tradition in order to determine any meaning from life, and so on.
    Last edited by Scots Taffer; 11th Dec 2009 at 19:04.

  21. #521
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: Lost in transit.
    Quote Originally Posted by Scots Taffer View Post
    I think that their view on Judaism is comparable to most religions - embrace "mystery" and "God's will" when life shovels you shit and tragedy, follow ritual and tradition in order to determine any meaning from life, and so on.
    I'm not talking about the particulars of the faith, but the experience of being part of the Jewish community. Take the way the way everyone, even Lawrence, goes "Al Silverman? Esther's barely cold!" I'm sure if I had experience of the Jewish community, there'd be a knowing smirk at that point.

    Anyway, it stil gets a big thumbs up from me.

  22. #522
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2000
    Location: sup
    Oh, sure. Thankfully I think they kept the cultural in-jokes to a relative minimum and ones like that weren't too hard for the audience to pick up on anyway.

    "Just look at the parking lot...!"

    Just quietly, it's my movie of the year so far.

  23. #523
    Still Subjective
    Registered: Dec 1999
    Location: Europops
    Quote Originally Posted by Aerothorn View Post
    For instance, a good chunk would find the above comment...anti-semetic (sic)!
    What kind of incredible bullshit is this? Why don't you switch the word Jew in your post for Blacks or Koreans? ffs. If you're going to make generalisations about any group of people what do you expect?

    And it's Jewish culture.

    FWIW I haven't seen this film yet but its on my list. I'll post my impressions as a follow up to you guys to see how it compares. In particular if I see any in-jokes that imo might go over the heads of non-Jews I'll let you know. I doubt there will be though, more likely they'd be too in for me to get, not living in a ghetto with my peoples and all (though I'm sure some of the brothers will get round to discussing it with me at some point and some of them are North Londoners iyswim).

  24. #524
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2001
    Location: Tatry Mountains, Poland
    I've just watched There Will Be Blood.

    I have no idea why this movie is supposed to be some kind of milestone in the history of cinema. Daniel Day-Lewis was incredible, as always. But the screenplay was... meh. Nihil novi. It was floating above the surface of all presented problems (sin, guilt, revange, cynicism, church, false prophets etc.) and did not dive into any of them.
    Last edited by bukary; 12th Dec 2009 at 08:27.

  25. #525
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2000
    Location: sup
    Watched Extract today, what a massive comedic misfire, and rewatched Children of Men, which still absolutely blows me away with its virtuoso tracking shots and the lived-in detail of the world that absolutely immerses you.

    bukary, I need to rewatch this also as it just made a massive impression upon me on a single viewing but I thought it was very interesting as a meditation on two of societies biggest perceived evils: capitalism and religion, as well as being a pretty intimate character study that is almost completely nihilistic in its aspect.

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