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View Poll Results: How long will Trump be President?

Voters
89. You may not vote on this poll
  • 1 Term (4 Years)

    17 19.10%
  • 2 Terms (8 Years)

    24 26.97%
  • 1st Term Impeachment/Assassination

    39 43.82%
  • 2nd Term Impeachment/Assassination

    0 0%
  • I don't know what's going on!

    9 10.11%

Thread: ✮✮✮ !Trump Dump! ✮✮✮

  1. #6351
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    You know who did use the money Obama left them to enrich themselves and their friends, though?

  2. #6352
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    Khamenei? Maybe Hezbollah? Possibly Saudi Arabia, via some crazy round-about way?

    ...Donald Trump? :O

  3. #6353
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Look no further than the GOP tax bill.

    The difference is that Americans don't protest it.

  4. #6354
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    Cuz maybe we're getting a little break from it. For about 3-5 years or so.

    By the time the tax breaks start sunsitting, we'll probably have a Democrat in office, and they'll take the blame for it.

  5. #6355
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Meanwhile, Lord Dampnut appears to be busy violating the emoluments clause: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/news/nati...192131074.html

    Take a guess whether Congress will do anything about it.

  6. #6356
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: the Sheeple Pen
    Quote Originally Posted by @realDonaldTrump
    North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un just stated that the “Nuclear Button is on his desk at all times.” Will someone from his depleted and food starved regime please inform him that I too have a Nuclear Button, but it is a much bigger & more powerful one than his, and my Button works!
    What? This is pretty bad and childish even by Trumpet's low standards, it's like he's tweeting straight from his radioactive sandbox with his nuclear toys. I don't normally follow his Twitter activity, but it's a rather strange experience when I do. A lot of the tweets are pure (unintentional) comedy and I find them rather funny, until I realise that there's nothing funny about them, and I proceed to quickly close Twitter in disgust.

  7. #6357
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Like the old saying, engaging at his level--even in laughing at his antics--is like wrestling a pig in the mud. You only get yourself muddy, and then you realize that the pig likes it. Except I'd substitute a pig in the mud with a sad old hobo that pisses himself farting loudly as his argument and thumps his chest in victory. Something more appropriately Trumpesque about that image. Engaging with it, even laughing at him, is only rolling yourself around in the piss puddle, and then you realize that the sad old hobo likes it.

    Edit. Perspective:
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Horton
    Republican foreign policy expert Richard Haass reflects on the catastrophe that is Donald J Trump. 17 Trump tweets yesterday in increasing measures of insanity.
    Quote Originally Posted by @RichardHaass.
    "In the last 24 hours Trump has threatened to 1) cut aid to nuclear-armed, terrorist-laden Pakistan; 2) cut aid to miffed Palestinians after he alters US Jerusalem policy, and 3) boasted his nuclear button is bigger than Kim Jung-un's. This is our commander-in-chief. Think about it." 5:37 PM - 2 Jan 2018
    Last edited by demagogue; 3rd Jan 2018 at 08:54.

  8. #6358
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Qantas
    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    Look no further than the GOP tax bill.

    The difference is that Americans don't protest it.
    There were a lot of protests, particularly targeted at the swing GOP votes like Collins, McCain, Flake, Corker. Susan Collins was a target of protests all through December, at her home, at her office in Maine, in the capitol. But after the horse trading was done and they all announced their support for the bill, it became a lost cause.

    As usual, protesting is mostly a feel good activity that doesn't seem to have much if any influence on the outcome.

  9. #6359
    Bannon came out swinging: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/...-michael-wolff

    I find that somewhat more plausible than most. Trump himself is known to send funds himself in order to "influence" government officials in ways that benefit his properties.


    But also note another falsehood (fake MSM news) that's nowmade it's way into mainstream lexicon. It's false. That literally never happened. The papers in question very quietly retracted the original story after publishing it without announcement.

  10. #6360
    Moderator
    Registered: Apr 2003
    Location: Wales
    I've read that article 3 times now, T_T, and I cannot see any relationship between it and your comments. What am I missing?

  11. #6361
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Tony's first paragraph just highlights that article without further comment, except that that will be a sensational and entertaining book when it comes out, like the sly satisfaction you feel in those episodes of Game of Thrones when the most devious & snakeish evil characters like Little Finger/Bannon goes after a dim-witted evil character like Joffery/Trump.

    His second paragraph is (it seems) responding to the post above his, i.e., Trump horse deals to get policies that benefit him like a tax break on his properties. Re: the "fake MSM news", I feel like a link to the retracted article is missing somewhere in there.

  12. #6362
    Quote Originally Posted by demagogue View Post
    His second paragraph is (it seems) responding to the post above his, i.e., Trump horse deals to get policies that benefit him like a tax break on his properties. Re: the "fake MSM news", I feel like a link to the retracted article is missing somewhere in there.
    Referencing the story that they went after Deutsche Bank's Trump accounts, which was quietly retracted AFTER they left it out long enough for the story to spread virally and be believed.

  13. #6363
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    That's the story CNN retracted 7 hours later, right?

    I look at it two ways.

    1. Okay, you all don't like Trump. I get it. Lots of people don't. It's far from being uncommon. But these news sites have to maintain their journalistic integrity. If they rush out these damning news stories without doing their due diligence, it only serve to harm them moreso in the long run.

    2. But hey, at least they retracted the false stories, and made very public apologies.

    Now all these people, usually the hardcore pundits and the crazies, damning CNN and the like for these very public apologies is actually counterproductive, since they're all but punishing them out for ultimately doing the right thing. You're right, it shouldn't have been published in the first place, but they stepped it back. They could've just left it hanging, uncommented on like some other, less responsible news sites do.

    Though with that said, I've quit watching CNN. I like my news neutral.

  14. #6364
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Or as the Fusion GPS guys (the original investigators into Trump's dubious, money-laundering-looking business dealings with Russians & early discoverers of the Kremlin's efforts to support Trump's election) put it in their NYTimes editorial:

    We suggested investigators look into the bank records of Deutsche Bank and others that were funding Mr. Trump’s businesses. Congress appears uninterested in that tip: Reportedly, ours are the only bank records the House Intelligence Committee has subpoenaed.
    Edit: Renz ninja'd my response to Tony but 'salright.
    Last edited by demagogue; 3rd Jan 2018 at 14:35.

  15. #6365
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    Fusion is apparently pretty angry at our current congress, recently writing up a scathing rebuttal demanding the to release their entire testimony, rather than taking isolated, piecemeal statements from it in order to spin it into something more damning than what it was when taken within context.

    I'll see if I can dig it up.

    edit: okay, you just posted it. I read the Politico piece, you posted the source.

  16. #6366
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Trump's response to the Bannon attack is today's dose of surreality:

    Statement from the President of the United States

    Steve Bannon has nothing to do with me or my Presidency. When he was fired, he not only lost his job, he lost his mind. Steve was a staffer who worked for me after I had already won the nomination by defeating seventeen candidates, often described as the most talented field ever assembled in the Republican party.

    Now that he is on his own, Steve is learning that winning isn't as easy as I make it look. Steve had very little to do with our historic victory, which was delivered by the forgotten men and women of this country. Yet Steve had everything to do with the loss of a Senate seat in Alabama held for more than thirty years by Republicans. Steve doesn't represent my base—he's only in it for himself.

    Steve pretends to be at war with the media,which he calls the opposition party, yet he spent his time at the White House leaking false information to the media to make himself seem far more important than he was. It is the only thing he does well. Steve was rarely in a one-on-one meeting with me and only pretends to have had influence to fool a few people with no access and no clue, whom he helped write phony books.

    We have many great Republican members of Congress and candidates who are very supportive of the Make America Great Again agenda. Like me, they love the United States of America and are helping to finally take our country back and build it up, rather than simply seeking to burn it all down.

  17. #6367
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    Trump's deep state now, brah!

  18. #6368
    Moderator
    Registered: Apr 2003
    Location: Wales
    Thanks for the explanation, guys - appreciate it.

    Unlike Starker, Trump does affect me a little. I never have to read the news to know when the big mouth has opened about North Korea, Iran, Palestine or anywhere. I just have to listen to the increase in the number of low-level training flights in mid Wales. The noise is quite painful sometimes.

  19. #6369
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by demagogue View Post
    Trump's response to the Bannon attack is today's dose of surreality:
    What do you mean? We have always been at war with Eastasia.

  20. #6370
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    I can't help but laugh at the fact that the Trump administration is now trying to downplay Bannon as some hanger-on he barely saw, and who did nothing in the White House...

    ...yet he was his senior advisor, and was also assigned, by Trump himself, to the NSC. These are two roles, combined together, that requires Bannon to meet with the president on a regular basis.

  21. #6371
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    On that note... this is a fun article today:

    Donald Trump Didn’t Want to Be President: One year ago: the plan to lose, and the administration’s shocked first days.

    Trump did not enjoy his own inauguration. He was angry that A-level stars had snubbed the event, disgruntled with the accommodations at Blair House, and visibly fighting with his wife, who seemed on the verge of tears. Throughout the day, he wore what some around him had taken to calling his golf face: angry and pissed off, shoulders hunched, arms swinging, brow furled, lips pursed.

    The first senior staffer to enter the White House that day was Bannon. On the inauguration march, he had grabbed 32-year-old Katie Walsh, the newly appointed deputy chief of staff, and together they had peeled off to inspect the now-vacant West Wing. The carpet had been shampooed, but little else had changed. It was a warren of tiny offices in need of paint, the décor something like an admissions office at a public university. Bannon claimed the non*descript office across from the much grander chief of staff’s suite and immediately requisitioned the whiteboards on which he intended to chart the first 100 days of the Trump administration. He also began moving furniture out. The point was to leave no room for anyone to sit. Limit discussion. Limit debate. This was war.

    Those who had worked on the campaign noticed the sudden change. Within the first week, Bannon seemed to have put away the camaraderie of Trump Tower and become far more remote, if not unreachable. “What’s up with Steve?” Kushner began to ask. “I don’t understand. We were so close.” Now that Trump had been elected, Bannon was already focused on his next goal: capturing the soul of the Trump White House.

    He began by going after his enemies. Few fueled his rancor toward the standard-issue Republican world as much as Rupert *Murdoch — not least because Murdoch had Trump’s ear. It was one of the key elements of Bannon’s understanding of Trump: The last person the president spoke to ended up with enormous influence. Trump would brag that Murdoch was always calling him; Murdoch, for his part, would complain that he couldn’t get Trump off the phone.

    “He doesn’t know anything about American politics, and has no feel for the American people,” Bannon told Trump, always eager to point out that Murdoch wasn’t an American. Yet in one regard, Murdoch’s message was useful to Bannon. Having known every president since Harry *Truman — as Murdoch took frequent opportunities to point out — the media mogul warned Trump that a president has only six months, max, to set his agenda and make an impact. After that, it was just putting out fires and battling the opposition.

    This was the message whose urgency Bannon had been trying to impress on an often distracted Trump, who was already trying to limit his hours in the office and keep to his normal golf habits. Bannon’s strategic view of government was shock and awe. In his head, he carried a set of decisive actions that would not just mark the new administration’s opening days but make it clear that nothing ever again would be the same. He had quietly assembled a list of more than 200 executive orders to issue in the first 100 days. The very first EO, in his view, had to be a crackdown on immigration. After all, it was one of Trump’s core campaign promises. Plus, Bannon knew, it was an issue that made liberals batshit mad.

    Bannon could push through his agenda for a simple reason: because nobody in the administration really had a job. Priebus, as chief of staff, had to organize meetings, hire staff, and oversee the individual offices in the Executive-branch departments. But Bannon, Kushner, and Ivanka Trump had no specific responsibilities — they did what they wanted. And for Bannon, the will to get big things done was how big things got done. “Chaos was Steve’s strategy,” said Walsh.

    On Friday, January 27 — only his eighth day in office — Trump signed an executive order issuing a sweeping exclusion of many Muslims from the United States. In his mania to seize the day, with almost no one in the federal government having seen it or even been aware of it, Bannon had succeeded in pushing through an executive order that overhauled U.S. immigration policy while bypassing the very agencies and personnel responsible for enforcing it.

    The result was an emotional outpouring of horror and indignation from liberal media, terror in immigrant communities, tumultuous protests at major airports, confusion throughout the government, and, in the White House, an inundation of opprobrium from friends and family. What have you done? You have to undo this! You’re finished before you even start! But Bannon was satisfied. He could not have hoped to draw a more vivid line between Trump’s America and that of liberals. Almost the entire White House staff demanded to know: Why did we do this on a Friday, when it would hit the airports hardest and bring out the most protesters?

    “Errr … that’s why,” said Bannon. “So the snowflakes would show up at the airports and riot.” That was the way to crush the liberals: Make them crazy and drag them to the left.

  22. #6372
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    So that was Bannon's big plan -- to mobilise every Democrat-voting group of people into action? To defeat liberals by making them angry and politically active? Whip the snowflakes up into a deadly blizzard? I see that worked out so well already in places like Alabama.

    That would explain why the ban was so incompetently put together, though, and so easy to slap down by the courts. He never intended it to work, it was only ever meant to anger liberals.

  23. #6373
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    I didn't realize until the end that the whole thing is an excerpt from the upcoming book we were just talking about (where Bannon goes on the attack), Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House. You ought to read the whole excerpt; it's great. Really dramatizes the whole dumpster fire of this admin. That book is going to be gold when it comes out.

  24. #6374
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Yeah, the whole excerpt is great. I'd love to see the original interviews too.

  25. #6375
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    That was absolutely incredible, and I don't mean that in a good way.

    That's not to say the writing's bad. It's fine. But the story? It's equal parts hilarious and horrifying. To think that the mechanisms of what's currently the most power nation in the world are being managed so haphazardly by such stark amateurs, who are so grossly convinced of their own undeserved sense of superiority...

    ...man, I'm actually kinda glad the Republican congress has its shit at least somewhat together. I'm pretty sure they're the only reason Washington is still standing.

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