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Thread: What have you watched lately?

  1. #4051
    Still Subjective
    Registered: Dec 1999
    Location: Idiocy will never die
    Just seen 3 Billboards.

    Great. 4/5

  2. #4052
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2002
    Location: Landahn
    What did you think of the ending?

  3. #4053
    LittleFlower
    Registered: Jul 2001
    Location: Netherlands
    Quote Originally Posted by Harvester View Post
    The Belgian cult classic Man Bites Dog was recently released on iTunes. I heard a lot about how shocking it's supposed to be and how it's a deconstruction of the media's and viewers' obsession with violence and such. So I rented it to see what all the fuss was about.
    Some stuff (games, novels, films) are better when you play/read/view them with no knowledge beforehand. You already had an idea what you were about to watch. That has a big impact. I think I saw most of my favorite movies without knowing anything about the movie. When someone tells me: "go watch this movie", I will tell them "ok, I will watch that movie, but stop telling me right now anything, and I mean *anything* about that movie".

    I saw C'est arrivé près de chez vous in the theatre when it was released. I didn't realize that was 25 years ago.

    However, it didn't totally work for me. I've seen many user reviews on IMDb that said they were laughing all the way until the gruesome rape scene and then felt guilty for laughing.
    That reaction of course depends on the fact whether you can laugh about rape scenes or not. I don't think I could ever laugh about such a thing, not even if Monty Python did it. I guess I'm different than the average movie-goer. I don't enjoy violence. Certainly not any violence that looks realistic. When there is a gun-fight or a car-chase in a move, I turn it off. Or I go watch something else. That's how boring I find violence in movies.

    But still, when you see violence in a movie, like in "It has arrived close to you" (the original title of the movie), it can still make you think. And indeed, when I saw the movie, it did make me think. That's the point. I thought the movie was very funny, not because of the violence, but because of the absurdity. And indeed, I did not feel guilty either.

    In general I don't really like movies that try to make me feel implicated for watching them, that doesn't work on me.
    Are there many movies like that ?

    I felt the same thing with Funny Games. Michael Haneke went on and on in countless interviews about how the only correct way to watch his movie is to turn it off, or else you "need" the violence in your life.
    I had that movie on my list of stuff I should watch some time. But I never did. Partially because I've heard/read that it was a very unpleasant film with a lot of nasty violence.

    As I said, I don't enjoy violence in movies.
    But maybe there is a more wider general rule I have, for watching movies. That rule is that I need to like at least one of the main characters in the story. If I dislike everyone in a story, I find it very hard to enjoy the story. I don't have a lot of examples of that rule. But one that pops up is about The Walking Dead. I watched the first 3 seasons during the summer of 2014 or 2015. And then when I watched the next season, I realized I hoped all the main characters would trip and get eaten by zombies. I just didn't like any of them. (Well Daryl was maybe the exception). Since about a year I have access to Comedy Central. And I've noticed that in some comic shows, all the characters are actually utter assholes. (Teachers, Mom, Silicon Valley, etc). I don't like any of them. I find it hard to laugh about a series like that. Maybe it started with Seinfeld. Greatest show on earth, according to a lot of people. I have seen some episodes, but never watched them regularly. I find everyone in that show an asshole. Unfortunately this seems to be the trend in US comedy now. Laugh at assholes.

    Movies with nothing but violence. And assholes in comedy shows. Maybe it is because the general public in the US are violent assholes themselves.
    Last edited by Gryzemuis; 4th Feb 2018 at 10:00.

  4. #4054
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    Everyone has their own turn-offs. The one you mentioned where you can't watch a movie without likeable characters is one I've heard more often, and is understandable - you want to relate to the characters. I too am quickly bored by long action scenes, unless they're well-embedded into the plot and you really care what happens to the characters.

    I didn't really get what was funny about Man Bites Dog. I don't think it's a bad movie, it's just not very suited to my personal taste. What I read about people's reactions to the rape scene that they found it horrifying, and that made them feel guilty, because they were laughing all the way until that scene happened. I don't know whether this was an intended effect by the filmmakers. Since I didn't really find the movie funny, I didn't feel guilty for my reaction to the movie thus far.

    Are there many movies like that ?
    No, I don't think so, just a couple, and I mentioned Funny Games because it's the most egregious example. Reading the Haneke interviews about that movie made me roll my eyes out of my sockets. As for whether you should watch it, most of the violence happens offscreen, but the movie does have a nasty, unpleasant vibe - it's a tough watch. It was well-directed in that sense, but he failed to me feel guilty for watching it, nor did he make me question my relationship to cinematic violence, which was his intent according to the interviews.

    Another movie I've heard made people guilty for laughing at the jokes was Observe and Report, with Seth Rogen. I did laugh at the dark humor of that movie, but again, I can't be arsed to feel guilty about that. Basically, I know I have good and bad qualities as a person and I do know there's a dark side lurking in me, but I can't be made to feel worse about myself because of my reaction to a movie (like laughing at a movie's jokes). In a theoretical sense I suppose it's possible, but I've just never encountered such a movie thus far.

  5. #4055
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    So if you laugh at Blackadder's jokes then there's something wrong with you? When did this happen? That has dark humour all over it.

    Or for darker you have Nightmare on Elm Street, Gremlins etc. I see nothing wrong at all with laughing at dark humour related jokes. Doesn't make you a psychokiller or anything.

  6. #4056
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    I haven't seen Man Bites Dog, but I did just see mother!, so I'm going to wonder aloud if anyone else saw it and/or got anything out of it. I get the feeling it was constructed to be something of a mindfuck, but just comes across as Aronofsky cranking the shock valve because he's bored. Still, since he's never been one for restraint, it's entertaining seeing a movie where he almost forcibly keeps the entire first half quiet, tight, and withdrawn only to have it unravel and explode in the end. As an exercise in form, that sort of structure can be pretty rewarding.

    In terms of function... enh. Lots of people are trying to do the interpretation dance, from ecological warning to biblical allegory, but I saw it as a pretty easy read on the perils of being an artist. I'm going to blather on about what seemed perfectly obvious to me, just in case it's not to anyone else.

    You have the artist, Him, a 'tortured' poet who uses anything and everything as fuel for his work. Which is to say, a quintessential dickhead. Artistry is essentially a filter - you feed an artist something, the artist processes it through their internal psyche, and what results is a product of their very specific point of view. So you have the poet running out of inspiration (a burnt out house), but finding it in someone who revives and restores the place, and the product of that union is, of course, a baby. Which he promptly gives away; the movie internalises the act of producing art for people as a sort of collective strip-mining of the soul, but just in case you don't get that symbolism, there's the scenes with the baby eating which, horrific as they may seem, are true to the act of the public consciousness digesting a work of art. I also found the scene where he takes the wife's heart and crushes it emotionally straightforward - you get what you can out of people, deal with the fallout of using them to further your own art, calcify that experience into a marker that represents the experience, and move on to the next thing you can use.

    Those are the broad strokes for me, anyway. I think it's internally consistent as a movie when looking at it this way, even taking the bits with the bleeding hole in the floor and the Cain and Abel situation with the visitors' kids. It's weird, but it's pretty much an allegorical stage play - which reminds me, the fact that this is all one set means it's also pretty easy to stage. May have been part of the intent?
    Last edited by Sulphur; 5th Feb 2018 at 05:48.

  7. #4057
    El Shagmeister
    Registered: Jul 2000
    Location: Under your fingernails.
    Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.
    Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.
    Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.
    Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.
    Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.
    Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.
    Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.
    Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.
    Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.
    Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.
    Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.
    Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.
    Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.
    FUCK, IT GOT CANCELLED.
    The End.

  8. #4058
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    I also started watching Dirk Gently season 2, but it's not gripping me like the first season did.

    Kong: Skull Island - It's pretty to look at, but not as good as Peter Jackson's version.

    Looper - Dunno why I waited so long to see this one, it's great! Great story, great performances. Very well thought-out action scenes.

    The Florida Project - Damn this was good! Great performances by Willem Dafoe and first-timer Bria Vinaite, but Brooklynn Prince steals the show. It's rare to see child actors believably behaving like children onscreen, but these kids are all great. Not just for the fun scenes either, when shit gets heavy late in the movie, Brooklynn brings the emotion. I almost cried. It's an odd story. It's so bleak that if the perspective was slightly shifted it could be a Lars Von Trier movie, but it isn't. Just like the kids in the story can shut out the bad stuff happening in the background and just be kids, writer/director Sean Baker focuses on the good things, and the result is a joyous movie. As for the ending? Baker sacrifices realism in favor of a fairy tale ending, but I'm not mad. Sometimes it's ok to believe in fairy tales.

  9. #4059
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    There's a car floating through space right now, and you can watch it live!

  10. #4060
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    Aaaaaaaaand the flat earthers show their flat brain waves in the comments section.

  11. #4061
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    I met a person who believed that stuff. Highly intelligent person, so it made no sense at all for him to believe in that stuff. To him it was all one big government conspiracy. He couldn't give me an answer when I asked him what what was on the other side (vertically) if the earth was flat. Tried explaining to him that if you were to go to a building and look out, you'd see the natural slight curve. Government altered glass he says. I say to him to go to a mountain top then, or the roof of that building and look out. No answer.

    He was a anti-vaxer as well. Don't even get me started on that one.
    Last edited by icemann; 7th Feb 2018 at 23:26.

  12. #4062
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    He was not intelligent. If he can't understand Foucault's pendulum and measurement of the circumference by angle of shadows five hundred miles apart then he is simply a mimic of intelligence. It also takes an enormous amount of cognitive dissonance to support a paranoid conspiracy which makes no sense from a purely motive based standpoint.

    There are times when I think perhaps we have been dumbed down through some chemical means though not chemtrails or any of that crap. It's almost as if the lead in our gasoline had a delayed reaction not felt by the previous generation. That makes no sense because it isn't in there anymore and lead settles very well. Unless it were well dispersed in the top soil and keeps getting kicked up through farming and such. Eh. Not likely.

    The only truly altruistic thing in the world is the passing of knowledge. The refusal to accept it is therefore the most shameful and dumbfounding.

    As for the thread, I haven't seen a damn thing I liked lately. I mentioned seeing "The Blood on Satans Claw" right? It's a horror made in the early seventies which leads you down a path of desire to a bad ending of course. I liked that one for it's odd distractions which nevertheless fit well into the plot. It wasn't as good as the original "Wicker Man" but managed to horrify using aspects of the same theme.

    I still have hopes for The Walking Dead but they have been losing their way lately. They killed off Francine (Dahlia Legault) without giving her a worthy sacrifice type death even. I liked her. She looks way the hell better in person than on the show too.

    Next will be Josh of the Saviors that my daughter and I met at Tupelo Haunted Castle I guess. I don't mind them dying I just don't want it to be for no reason. I also would like it very much if they would pay attention to their previous writing and let them have a death in keeping with their character.

    Anyway nice link Renz. I could watch that and insult flat eathers for hours with things like "your mom is flat" and "your brain waves are flat". Pretty cool to do it to the image of a tumbling space car.

  13. #4063
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    Quote Originally Posted by Tocky View Post
    There are times when I think perhaps we have been dumbed down through some chemical means though not chemtrails or any of that crap. It's almost as if the lead in our gasoline had a delayed reaction not felt by the previous generation. That makes no sense because it isn't in there anymore and lead settles very well. Unless it were well dispersed in the top soil and keeps getting kicked up through farming and such. Eh. Not likely.

    The only truly altruistic thing in the world is the passing of knowledge. The refusal to accept it is therefore the most shameful and dumbfounding.
    Your not the only one. That's why I often say "only stupid people are breeding". I blame the internet. People used to hold in more information since it wasn't a click or swipe away. Now if you want to know the answer to something you just Google it, so of course we all have been dumbed down as a result.

  14. #4064
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    Quote Originally Posted by Sulphur View Post
    In terms of function... enh. Lots of people are trying to do the interpretation dance, from ecological warning to biblical allegory, but I saw it as a pretty easy read on the perils of being an artist. I'm going to blather on about what seemed perfectly obvious to me, just in case it's not to anyone else.
    I agree with your interpretation, but I also think the biblical allegory is pretty obviously also there, and Aronofsky has admitted as much. However, I don't actually know what he's trying to say with the biblical allegory. I recognize the players and events, but what point is he trying to make with it? I think the stuff about what you said about the artistic process, and more generally, about people for whom all the love you have to give will never be enough is far more interesting.

    Tonight, I watched Spotlight. Now that's a deserving Oscar winner if you ask me. It strikes just the right tone in my opinion. I love how restrained it is, considering the subject matter. I could've actually understood people making a far more overtly anti-religious film of these events, out of sheer rage about the abuse and the cover-up by the Church authorities. But that could never have resulted in such a powerful movie and such a strong cinematic statement of accusation. If the film was full of fury and lost some of its objectivity because of that, it would've been easier to dismiss by the types of people who seek to play down the scandal because it makes them look bad. I'm glad they did it this way.
    Last edited by Harvester; 8th Feb 2018 at 19:16.

  15. #4065
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    To please the wife, we went to see "50 Shades Freed". Movie was ok. Very predictable and felt like a soap. Nearly fell asleep at one point.

    I used to be a huge soap fan, with Passions being my favorite of the lot. But that finished in 2010 and the most I'd watched since soap wise was a rewatch of Melroes Place many years ago. That I'd prefer to this, but you do what you have to please those your with on occasion.

  16. #4066
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    The Cloverfield Paradox - Starts off really good. I like the setup and all the initial revelations but then it just keeps piling on more and more weird shit until every new plot twist stops being "holy shit!", and becomes "oh? well, I guess this is happening now". It kinda pulls it back together at the very end though, and actually made me interested in what comes next.

  17. #4067
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Quote Originally Posted by Harvester View Post
    I agree with your interpretation, but I also think the biblical allegory is pretty obviously also there, and Aronofsky has admitted as much. However, I don't actually know what he's trying to say with the biblical allegory. I recognize the players and events, but what point is he trying to make with it? I think the stuff about what you said about the artistic process, and more generally, about people for whom all the love you have to give will never be enough is far more interesting.
    I wasn't ready to make the effort to parse the religious angle, so a cursory Googling turns this up which breaks it down thoroughly. I suppose the movie's overarching theme is that creation cycles between death and rebirth until perfection or homeostasis is attained, which is decidedly non-biblical but that's about as much as I'm willing to take from it.

    Meanwhile, Star Trek: Discovery ends with a series of brainwilting logical leaps that made me go, 'urghwhafrble?' At least Yeoh made me smile with the comic timing she played the last scene between her, Burnham, and the detonator. If anyone wants to know what giving up when you've written yourself into a corner looks like -- this is what it looks like.

    Also, that ending. I cringed pretty hard even though I knew what I was going to see, but really, come on. After exploding most of Trek in favour of being its own conflicted seven-headed mutant twistheap, all that glowing fanservice did was remind me of missed potential.

    Series score: 6.5/10 tribbles. Nice production values, but conflicted at its core. Some decent to good stuff buried in what was probably a very messy showrunner fallout, essentially giving us the most schizophrenic Trek show in history. Spin it off as an original series, as most of this isn't in keeping with Trek anyway.*



    *The most enjoyable episode was the one with the time travel shenanigans; I hope someone realises one of Trek's strengths was its ability to do individual episodes as self-contained exploration of an idea or, at the very least, as an entertaining piece of storytelling. Over-arching drama doesn't really work in this show unless you're committed to the idea and give it space instead of doing it on impulse, and this was half-hearted in both regards. Here's hoping Season 2 rights the ship.



    **Yes, the puns are intentional. No, I'm not sorry.
    Last edited by Sulphur; 12th Feb 2018 at 03:23.

  18. #4068
    Still Subjective
    Registered: Dec 1999
    Location: Idiocy will never die
    Quote Originally Posted by N'Al View Post
    What did you think of the ending?
    Good ending.

    Why?

  19. #4069
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2002
    Location: Landahn
    The movie just sort of... peters out. Thankfully it’s not the standard “Everybody lived happily ever after”, but it’s not a complete subversion of that either, really. It’s just something kinda in the middle.

    I loved it (in fact, I would probably put the whole movie at a 5/5), but I’ve had other people bring up the ending before, so I was curious.

  20. #4070
    Still Subjective
    Registered: Dec 1999
    Location: Idiocy will never die
    I thought it was a great resolution. Are people thinking it petered out? The characters evolved and it was really nice to watch.

  21. #4071

  22. #4072
    PC Gamering Smartey Man
    I <3 consoles and gamepads

    Registered: Aug 2007
    Location: New Zealand
    Quote Originally Posted by Tocky View Post
    I still have hopes for The Walking Dead but they have been losing their way lately. They killed off Francine (Dahlia Legault) without giving her a worthy sacrifice type death even. I liked her. She looks way the hell better in person than on the show too.
    I'm baffled as to why this show is so popular. I saw bits and pieces of the first couple seasons and it was unbelivably dull.

    It doesn't help that show's asthetics are so steeped in Hollywood artificiality that you have to have a huge suspension of disbelief. The characters are mostly all fashion model attractive. Unkempt Beauty trope in full force, a la Lost. Rick Grimes' and Darryl's facial hair are appropriately groomed at all time to be at peak fashion magazine masculinity. The women look like Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition models who've just rolled around in some dirt for a bit. TWD wouldn't be out of place if it aired on The CW really.

  23. #4073
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Black Panthaaaaaa!!!

    Yeah, it was good. Tight plot, entertaining action scenes, good performances. Like in the best comic book movies, the hero goes up against not just tough enemies, but tough choices.

  24. #4074
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Black Panther, AKA "Maybe dueling isn't the best way of choosing a government".

  25. #4075
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2002
    Location: Pacific Northwest
    2018 Oscar Nominated Live-action Shorts

    Dekalb Elementary - So the first minute of the first short got off to a chilling start when a youth walks into the reception office at an elementary school and casually pulls out a Kalashnikov lookalike. It was pretty telling when there were audible gasps of dismay from other people in the audience. A decent reminder that heroism isn't all machismo, and that maybe people with mental issues should not be allowed firearms. This film was based on the transcript of a real life emergency call from a few years ago.

    The Silent Girl - This one was about a deaf girl whose parents, wanting their daughter to fit in at school, shun sign language lessons and put all their hopes in speech therapy. It puts a new perspective on alienation. There's being alone, then there's being alone with no hope of communicating with the other human beings around you.

    My Nephew Emmett - A retelling of Emmett Till's story from his uncle's perspective. Till was from Chicago and was staying at his uncle's place in Mississippi when he whistled at a young woman in town. That's a capital crime in Mississippi if you're a black 14-year old and the woman is white. Emmett's aunt offers money in exchange for her nephew's safety, and his uncle even volunteers to take his place, but their pleas are refused. They don't show it in the film, but anyone familiar with the story is probably also familiar with the picture of Till, mutilated beyond recognition, from his funeral. I'd dismiss it as another example of "southern justice," and while true, I have to acknowledge people anywhere and everywhere are capable of that kind of evil when it's cultivated in the right environment.

    The Eleven O'Clock - A patient who suffers from illusions of grandeur and also claims to be a psychiatrist walks into a therapy session with another psychiatrist and then begins to claim he really is a psychiatrist and begins to psychoanalyze the other psychiatrist on the pretense he is the one suffering from illusions of grandeur and is the actual patient, not the other way around. I'm going to pretend this is how psychiatrists and therapy sessions actually work in Australia.

    Watu Wote - This one is also based on a real life incident. There's an interesting parallel with the first film, with innocent women and children again menaced by psychos with (fully automatic this time) AKs, who themselves are met with a selflessness and resolve that doesn't come without a heavy price. I can't say it has a happy ending, but were it not for the stolid refusal of one group of people to sell out another group of people, it would have been far worse. This was the final entry in the collection and my favorite of those shown.
    Last edited by Slasher; 18th Feb 2018 at 03:38.

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