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Thread: Dinosaur news

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered: Oct 2002
    Location: London / London / London

    Dinosaur news

    My mate Karl and his team did some neat stuff on T rex which yeah, confirms earlier thought that a >5000 kg biped would explode if it tried to run: https://peerj.com/articles/3420/

    I did some stuff showing that kneecaps in both birds and humans actually reduce the amount of force being applied by the extensor muscles: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...jzo.12485/full

    I AM VERY SMART etc

    Viv

  2. #2
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    And here I thought that the thread title referred to the people dismayed by the recent Doctor Who announcement.

    Also, what's the point of a T. Rex if it can't run?

  3. #3
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: Cologne
    Did he consider comparisons to the spring function of tendons and muscles in kangaroos that transfers the energy from the landing into their next jump?

    //P.S. I'm also very smart.

  4. #4
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: Cologne
    He should also consider that a scientist who proves that T. Rex can't run is bound to get snacked out of a Jeep going at full speed through a Pleistocene jungle.

    And now for something completely different:
    Last edited by Kolya; 19th Jul 2017 at 09:25.

  5. #5
    Member
    Registered: Oct 2002
    Location: London / London / London
    Their take on it was bone stresses this time round, rather than issues with energy cycling or power requirements. Making their simulation move fast (or use any running gait) produces a failure load in the bones. I'd imagine they have terms for passive storage and return yeah, the GAITSYM system they've got is a full-fat musculoskeletal dynamics solver. They know their stuff.

    Also the pleistocene? A jungle in the pleistocene? A t rex in a jungle in the pleistocene? You are WAY out.

  6. #6
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: Cologne
    You forget there's also a Jeep.

  7. #7
    Member
    Registered: Oct 2002
    Location: London / London / London
    If the jeep is a sledge, the jungle is basically not there, and the T rex is a short-faced bear, I'd agree with that. I might get eaten.

  8. #8
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    What did they eat that doesn't involve running but sustains that kind of body?
    Are carnivore megafauna that aren't able to run a regular thing in nature?

  9. #9
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2008
    You wanna come over here and say that to my face?

    ...scavenging the other big dead things?

  10. #10
    Member
    Registered: Oct 2002
    Location: London / London / London
    A lot of other things were also very very big, and hence also relatively pretty slow. I guess they just walked after each other? (But walking is still pretty quick when you have legs 2m long). Unfortunately there is nothing really extant to compare them to. The polar bear is the biggest terrestrial carnivore and that's only like a ton, max (and they swim a fair bit). Scaling of speed is a pretty big topic, and while speed should increase with size it tops out in medium-sized animals. Square:Cube tissue stress scaling is probably a big part of it, but there's an interesting recent paper on acceleration times and available anaerobic energy: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-017-0241-4 (might be paywalled, sorry). The gist is that large animals can get round the power limit by using longer acceleration times, but hit a metabolic limit with the duration they can sustain max effort for.


    T rex was a scavenger, yeah. Pretty much everything else in the world is, so it would be weird if it wasn't.
    Last edited by Vivian; 19th Jul 2017 at 12:28.

  11. #11
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    Quote Originally Posted by Vivian View Post
    A lot of other things were also very very big, and hence also relatively pretty slow. I guess they just walked after each other?
    "OMG there's a TRex chasing us. Let's go!... Ok... But just one more shrub then we really should get moving."

  12. #12
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    I like dinosaur news.

  13. #13
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    Hmmmm. Elephants run short distances. If it had some camouflage, enough to lie in wait, it could pounce from a heavily jungled area. It had to take in a lot of calories. Unless it followed a herd of large dinosaurs constantly it could not survive. And the tail is made for bringing smaller animals down not large ones. I guess it could be just balance but what a waste.

    Yes, I'm still trying to figure out how feathers got on a T Rex and what damn purpose they originally evolved for. Camo would be a development I could understand. With the right mimicry of leaves it might spring on that Jurassic Park jeep.

  14. #14
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    What is up with sauropod necks? I mean, brachiosaurs are kind of giraffe shaped, and diplodocus could theoretically rear up on its hind legs, so for them, reaching higher foliage makes sense. But most sauropods aren't adapted for reaching high. So... Why the long neck?

  15. #15
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Some drawing of them I saw once gave me the idea the long necks were to keep their heads above water, or eat off water-side trees, while their bodies could stay rather deep.

  16. #16
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    Quote Originally Posted by Tocky View Post
    Unless it followed a herd of large dinosaurs constantly it could not survive.
    One hypothesis I heard was that the serrations on their teeth kept rotting food in place and turned their bite into a septic nightmare. Rather like komodo dragons, they'd just need to get one bite on a target then wait a few days for it to die. Just go around biting as many prey animals as possible to assure a steady supply of carrion.

  17. #17
    Member
    Registered: May 2003
    Location: Sweden
    Quote Originally Posted by Tocky View Post
    Yes, I'm still trying to figure out how feathers got on a T Rex and what damn purpose they originally evolved for.
    I thought wearing feathers was so last year...

  18. #18

  19. #19
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    The Guardian nicely timed this article to align with our thread as well --
    https://www.theguardian.com/books/ga...rt-in-pictures

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