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Thread: Destiny 2 - MMOFPS-ARPG - PC/PS4/XB1 - Oct 24th/Sept 6th.

  1. #1
    PC Gamering Smartey Man
    I <3 consoles and gamepads

    Registered: Aug 2007
    Location: New Zealand

    Destiny 2 - MMOFPS-ARPG - PC/PS4/XB1 - Oct 24th/Sept 6th.

    After a decade long absence prodigal son Bungie has returned to PC.


  2. #2
    Thing What Kicks
    Registered: Apr 2004
    Location: London
    [facetious]But what about Mac?[/facetious]

  3. #3
    Member
    Registered: Sep 1999
    Location: No Maps for These Territories
    The PC version looks awesome, but the lack of cross saves is a dealbreaker for me. The PS4 Destiny community is really strong and I'm not willing to make the switch to an uncertain future on Battlenet for the sake of higher framerate and adjustable FOV. Also, Bungie/Activision are heavily skewed towards PS4 with exclusive content, a trend that will continue in D2. In a game as centered on gear as Destiny, this actually has turned out to be a pretty big deal.

    A cross save function would make this an automatic purchase on both platforms.

  4. #4
    PC Gamering Smartey Man
    I <3 consoles and gamepads

    Registered: Aug 2007
    Location: New Zealand
    Played the PC beta. Console gamers been hyping up this for the past three years? Just another corridor shooter with bullet sponge enemies. It's precisely what I said it looked like in 2012/2013:- Borderlands minus the fun, colourful presentation. Much better games to play out there like Wolfenstein 2014 and Doom 2016, hell Borderlands 2.

    The game runs never drops below 60fps on the highest settings. The consoles must truly be hot garbage if they need to run this at 30fps.
    Quote Originally Posted by ToolHead View Post
    The PS4 Destiny community is really strong
    There's no accounting for taste it seems. The game is utterly pedestrian.

  5. #5
    Thing What Kicks
    Registered: Apr 2004
    Location: London
    I just gave the intro bit a shot.
    It looks nice and runs smooth as butter.
    The movement's a bit floaty, but on the plus side, there's double jump.
    Guns seem nice, but even this brief time with it revealed that yeah, it's a game populated by bullet sponges.
    And from what I saw, it seems to be a gear grinder, which is a bit disappointing. I'd heard the first game was too, naturally, but I was hoping we'd begun to move away from skinner boxes. Nope.
    Unless I see it at a ridiculously knocked-down price, I'm probably going to stay away from this.

  6. #6
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2004
    Location: Netherlands
    Quote Originally Posted by Malf View Post
    I just gave the intro bit a shot.
    It looks nice and runs smooth as butter.
    The movement's a bit floaty, but on the plus side, there's double jump.
    Guns seem nice, but even this brief time with it revealed that yeah, it's a game populated by bullet sponges.
    And from what I saw, it seems to be a gear grinder, which is a bit disappointing. I'd heard the first game was too, naturally, but I was hoping we'd begun to move away from skinner boxes. Nope.
    Unless I see it at a ridiculously knocked-down price, I'm probably going to stay away from this.
    You're very into Diablo 3 though, right? What makes this game unpalatable in comparison? Just the bullet sponginess of it?
    Things do die with some haste in D3. I personally hate bullet sponge design a lot too.

  7. #7
    Thing What Kicks
    Registered: Apr 2004
    Location: London
    It's hard to describe, but with an FPS, there is, for me at least, an expectation that player ability should play more of a part in determining the outcome of combat than stats.

    D3's pure lizard-brained lootsplosion, and there's definitely a place for that, but not really in ability-based games.
    There's also some fun to be had in theory-crafting, but again, that rarely has a place in the average FPS unless the systems that allow theory-crafting are incredibly well balanced.
    The best theory-crafting game I ever played was the first Guild Wars, and that worked because the maximum level was relatively easy to achieve; it was then about mixing and matching hundred of skills into 8 that were useable.
    I've never seen an FPS try that level of theory-crafting, and from my limited time with Destiny, I can already tell it doesn't exist there, removing a lot of the compulsion to grind. If all grinding is doing is increasing your stats but not your options, you've designed your game wrong.

  8. #8
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    I haven't played the beta, due to not being home this week, but I've played and greatly enjoyed the first game on PS4. Yes, it is generic, and yes, the big foes are bullet sponges, but I found Destiny to be extremely well polished and balanced and a real joy to play. The upgrades to weapons and skills felt great. The ad-hoc coop was always enjoyable. I'm currently playing Borderlands 2 with my wife and it's fine, but its individual bits definitely don't feel nearly as well put together.

    I wonder, though, to what extent it's that the game is the only FPS I enjoyed on console/game pad and how the specifics would translate to KBAM.

  9. #9
    Thing What Kicks
    Registered: Apr 2004
    Location: London
    It did seem rather remarkably easy with KB&M. I suspect they haven't re-balanced the game's difficulty from console to take that into account.

    And it would be difficult to rebalance properly, I suspect. If they increased the HP of all targets, that would just piss people off and drive away potential customers. People know it's the easiest, laziest and most false way of increasing difficulty.
    Re-writing the the AI algorithms to present a more balanced challenge is not an easy task.
    Maybe increasing enemy count? But there, I suspect encounters and maps have been designed around how many enemies players will be facing. And at the end of the day, if reduced purely to numbers, increasing enemy count is identical to increasing HP. You're just changing where that HP pool is distributed.

  10. #10
    PC Gamering Smartey Man
    I <3 consoles and gamepads

    Registered: Aug 2007
    Location: New Zealand
    Quote Originally Posted by Malf View Post
    Re-writing the the AI algorithms to present a more balanced challenge is not an easy task.
    Killing Floor 2's difficulties are precisely like that. If a small indie studio like Tripwire could pull it off then a series with budget of a half-billlion dollars bankrolled by a literally the richest gaming company in the world (Activision) has no excuse.


  11. #11
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2002
    Location: Landahn

  12. #12
    Thing What Kicks
    Registered: Apr 2004
    Location: London
    While I've been having minor hype-induced urges to buy this, even after playing the mediocre beta, I watched most of this over the weekend which successfully dissuaded me from wasting the cash:



    And of course, good ol' Jim Sterling is typically vitriolic in this one, which is more a criticism of microtransactions, loot crates and season passes, but still heavily critical of Destiny 2:



    On top of this, I am enjoying The Division, the closest analogue of Destiny 2 I've got at the moment, and it offers enough variety for occasional dips in, while the "high end" play is obscure and complicated enough to prevent engaging me and making me spend every waking hour playing it. Why spend money buying Destiny 2, when I already have a game that does a lot of the things it does, but better?

    Not played the game co-op, but the Underground content seems like it could be a right laugh with friends, as scenarios are highly configurable and procedural, while not usually taking more than 20-30 minutes to complete.

  13. #13
    Southquarter.com/fms
    Registered: Apr 2000
    Location: The Akkala Highlands
    I rented Destiny 2 from a Redbox for a couple of days to see what all the hype was about. Played it for about an hour - utterly boring. Just completely linear and a straight forward shooter, with a completely cliched setting. Nothing at all to distinguish it from anything else out there. I'm surprised derivative games like this still get such glowing reviews. Haven't we seen this kind of things a million times already? Sorry, there's way better games to waste your time on.

  14. #14
    Well, all these reviews help make the decision easy.

    For why they're popular I got no idea. The only reason I can think of is that a lot of people were emotionally invested in Destiny being good because it's "OMG BUNGIE!!!", and a lot of them needed Destiny 2 to be good in order to avoid having to deal with the dissonance that goes along with realizing that thing you like actually sucks.

    Doesn't account for all of the fans and reviews but that's all I got.

  15. #15
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    I've already given an answer for myself, but obviously that didn't register, so I'll try again.

    I played the first Destiny on PS4, about one or two years after it was released, which means I got to play it with the DLC that apparently vastly improved the original game. Yes, Destiny is shallow, yes, it's a skinner box, but compared to similar games I liked it better. Take Borderlands 2: Destiny is more generically sci-fi and it's more po-faced, but the moment-to-moment gameplay (on console, with a controller) felt much, much better to me than that of Borderlands, and I like the aesthetics much more. Take Diablo 3: at least in coop mode and on a first playthrough, i.e. before Adventure Mode or whatever other modes the game offers, Diablo 3 was so easy, it felt like it played itself, while Destiny had challenging, fun missions that, in spite of the relatively shallow gameplay, still were designed to feel surprisingly varied.

    I never got hooked on Destiny, but for about a year I played it fairly regularly several times a week, half an hour before going to bed, and for that it was perfect. Coop with randoms was both easy and never toxic in my experience. The game felt good playing it, I enjoyed its aesthetics, and while the story was mediocre at best and often incoherent, its delivery (and most of the voice acting, once they'd replaced Dinklage's performance) still made it quite enjoyable. All in all, I got dozens of hours of enjoyment out of the game, without ever getting stuck in the kind of mechanical loop that keeps you playing but leaves a bad taste in your mouth.

  16. #16
    Administrator
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: above the clouds
    What I've picked up about Destiny myself was from the Daft Souls podcast while they were still doing that regularly. The positive reaction there was down to it being a relatively chilled experience to just drop into and escape. Clearly this doesn't work for everyone, but to me it sounds like it must be pleasant enough, and Thirith is more or less confirming that.

    I found the Jimquisition video interesting - my usual response to season passes and so forth is just to wait for a game of the year edition or something like that. I also find microtransactions irritating when on top of something you've already bought. I think Blizzard have avoided this with Overwatch in that you haven't been forced to pay for the upcoming content, it has come along with updates as a matter of course. You can pay for loot boxes but it doesn't have anything gameplay relevant.

    Sounds like Destiny 2's use of microtransaction is a bit silly, yet it's very hard to avoid the gradual creep of buying a little bit of extra whatever as it's often a few quid here and there. I've been guilty of it, partly due to my children wanting stuff for Warframe, which isn't a bad Destiny alternative, but also it's free to play initially. The same goes for MOBAs like League of Legends or Heroes of the Storm. It's probably down to human psychology that you'll spend way more in little charges over a few months than your 39.99 unless you track everything on a spreadsheet.

    Bit of a tangent to the subject of the thread, but it's unfortunately the way things are in the world that if there's a way to make more money a lot of people are just going to go for it, regardless of how sneaky the method is, or just using human psychology.

  17. #17

    Something like warframe I don't have a problem with though. It's a perfectly valid and fair loss leader strategy where you provide the basic system up front, and it's a perfectly honest transaction for people to pay for additional designed content in the same way that old school expansion packs where you'd get a couple floppies with a new campaign were perfectly legitimate.

    I find microtransactions for loot to be far more shady....although I should add that I'm not particularly tempted for loot boxes, because I realize that $3 buys me a new shade of paint for my airbrush and $10-$15 buys me a new Warmachine or Dropzone Commander mini.
    Last edited by Tony_Tarantula; 26th Oct 2017 at 15:07.

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