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View Poll Results: Should Britain leave the European Union?

Voters
53. You may not vote on this poll
  • YES!...Must Brexit!

    20 37.74%
  • NO!...We Must Remain!

    26 49.06%
  • I have no idea what I want, yet I will vote anyway!

    7 13.21%
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Results 601 to 625 of 647

Thread: BREXIT --->

  1. #601
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    Quote Originally Posted by PigLick View Post
    all this brexit talk and I still dont have my bacon
    Piglick just ain't Piglick without a pig to lick.

  2. #602
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Qantas
    Campaigning has always involved emotional manipulation, but yeah, I agree it's going to get worse. With the collection of vast portfolios of data on individuals, tools for mining it, and the technology to deliver an individually customized message for maximum effect, all that's lacking is smarter data science to really take advantage of it. So far, based on the micro-targeted ads that I get subjected to, I would say that software is still pretty dumb and we have time before it become highly effective.

    One of the things that worries me for the future is that the big databases and advertising infrastructure needed to conduct future campaigns is controlled by a small handful of very large companies, mostly in silicon valley. Meaning there is a risk of our national parties and candidates becoming dependent on a small number of tech executives who could have more influence than any big donors currently do.

    Fortunately, the big players like Google and Facebook have kept their services relatively open and politically neutral. But if for whatever reason these companies decided to use their services to promote a political agenda, like many media companies do, they could have a huge impact.

  3. #603
    Moderator
    Registered: Apr 2003
    Location: Wales
    Quote Originally Posted by heywood View Post
    It seems to be saying that . . .
    Thank you. You always give me a lucid explanation and I'm grateful.

  4. #604
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2001
    Location: uk
    Quote Originally Posted by heywood View Post
    One of the things that worries me for the future is that the big databases and advertising infrastructure needed to conduct future campaigns is controlled by a small handful of very large companies, mostly in silicon valley. Meaning there is a risk of our national parties and candidates becoming dependent on a small number of tech executives who could have more influence than any big donors currently do.
    It'll be interesting to see how these sorts of companies get on with their current strategy of "clicking on the advert counts as consent to do whatever we like with everything we can find about you" (coupled with hiding in parts of the world where pretty much all data is for sale to anyone) in a post GDPR world (not everything the EU has a hand in is a bad thing).

  5. #605
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    So, if you can trust the exit polls, it looks like the gamble didn't pay off and Tories will lose some seats, possibly even ending up short of the majority. Either way, doesn't look good for Theresa May.

  6. #606
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Hmm. The same exit poll error that happened in 2015 would still give them a majority. Definitely not a good move, though.

  7. #607
    Member
    Registered: Oct 2002
    Location: London / London / London
    Right, so May accidentally kicked the ball into the neighbours garden, and now she's teaming up with the local creationist, racist, sexist fuckwits to go fish it out. Awesome.

  8. #608
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Qantas
    So I guess I was right to be skeptical. What are the chances that May gets replaced?

  9. #609
    Member
    Registered: Oct 2002
    Location: London / London / London
    I'd say pretty high, but not sure when.

  10. #610
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    I guess it wouldn't properly be 2017 unless you traded in one barmy government for one even more duff.

  11. #611
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2003
    Location: The Land of Make Believe
    I can't see May being allowed to fight another general election. She somehow achieved the feat of losing seats to the worst opposition in living memory. She has managed to make things even more chaotic than they were before, which I didn't think possible.

    One has to enjoy the irony that, after slamming Corbyn as a terrorist sympathiser, she has to go cap in hand to the terrorist-supporting DUP for a majority.

  12. #612
    Member
    Registered: Oct 2002
    Location: London / London / London
    Actually I thought Corbyn and Labour were great. Credible, unified opposition with a sensible and plausible manifesto. Although If you'd asked me even a month or so ago I would definitely not have said that. This has been a real karate-kid moment for Corbs.

  13. #613
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2003
    Location: The Land of Make Believe
    Corbyn has acquitted himself well, but that doesn't alter what he is, nor does it make his fantasy wishlist of policies any more realistic or affordable.

    I find the whole thing profoundly hilarious.

  14. #614
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Here's an unapologetically leftist recap of the whole thing:


  15. #615
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2002
    Location: Pacific Northwest
    Could someone explain to a dumb (also lazy) American why Sinn Fein isn't taking their seats?

  16. #616
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Sinn Fein is a nationalist party whose goal is united Ireland. To take part in British politics would somewhat undermine their goal of not taking part in British politics.

    Really, though, it's just a form of protest.

  17. #617
    Still Subjective
    Registered: Dec 1999
    Location: Idiocy will never die
    Quote Originally Posted by SD View Post
    Corbyn has acquitted himself well, but that doesn't alter what he is, nor does it make his fantasy wishlist of policies any more realistic or affordable.
    I thought the whole thing was fully costed and validated by over 120 academic economists. Was the Lib Dem manifesto costed? Don't be a bitter yellow SD, Lib Dems did alright and Tim, despite being a nobody coming into this, did really well (imho) especially in the debates.

    None of this matters though - the Tories are the only game in town \o/

    It's not the leader that matters so much (see Labour for the prime example) but the policies.

  18. #618
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2003
    Location: The Land of Make Believe
    Quote Originally Posted by SubJeff View Post
    I thought the whole thing was fully costed and validated by over 120 academic economists. Was the Lib Dem manifesto costed? Don't be a bitter yellow SD, Lib Dems did alright and Tim, despite being a nobody coming into this, did really well (imho) especially in the debates.

    None of this matters though - the Tories are the only game in town \o/

    It's not the leader that matters so much (see Labour for the prime example) but the policies.
    The Institute for Fiscal Studies said that neither Labour nor the Tories were being honest about their tax and spending plans. The IFS thought that Labour's plans wouldn't raise anything like as much as the £50bn they were claiming, and if you know anything at all about what HMRC calls behavioural impact, you would have to agree with their conclusions.

    Like I said, fantasy economics.

    The Economist endorsed the Lib Dems in the election, so nuff said there.

    I am not bitter, just enjoying the complete hash of things the Tories are making without the Lib Dems around to make them look competent. The 2010-2015 coalition is already looking like a golden age of stability and good government.

  19. #619
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2001
    Location: uk
    Quote Originally Posted by SD View Post
    Like I said, fantasy economics.
    It's other people's money so it doesn't matter.

    and the magic money tree is absolute fact, not fantasy.

  20. #620
    Member
    Registered: May 2004

  21. #621
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    AKA "pray that there's intelligent life somewhere out in space, 'Cause there's bugger all down here on Earth!"

    You people still haven't just ripped that bandage off yet, huh? You're screwed yourselves; there's no hope for redemption; so just go ahead and own the disaster and get on with your smaller, more petty lives like we have. That should be the motto of 2017.

  22. #622
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    There's a German saying that goes something like this: the higher the monkey goes, the more of his arse he shows (Je höher der Affe steigt, je mehr er seinen Hintern zeigt).

    Let's just say that monkeys are climbing pretty high these days.

  23. #623
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo

  24. #624
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Now We Can Fund the NHS and Other Fairy Tales

  25. #625
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    With less than a year away from leaving the EU (there's also a transition period, but the process starts on 29th March 2019), the UK government has agreed on a plan for leaving the EU:

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-44747444

    The main details of the "Chequers statement" are as follows:

    * The UK would accept continuing "harmonisation" with EU rules on the trade in goods, covering only those necessary to ensure frictionless trade
    * Parliament would have the final say over how these rules are incorporated into UK law, retaining the right to refuse to do so
    * There will be different arrangements for trade in services, including financial products, with greater "regulatory flexibility" and "strong reciprocal arrangements"
    * Freedom of movement as it stands will come to an end but a "mobility framework" will ensure UK and EU citizens can continue to travel to each other's territories and apply for study and work
    * A new customs arrangement will be phased in, with the goal of "a combined customs territory"
    * The UK will be able to control its own tariffs and develop an independent trade policy
    * The jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice will end but the UK will pay regard to its decisions in areas where common rules were in force.

    [...]

    There is no mention in the document of either the single market or the customs union, which the UK has committed to leave after the end of a transition period in December 2020.

    Under plans for a free trade zone, the UK would be committed legally to following EU law for a large part of the economy, including manufacturing and farming.

    While Parliament would retain the right to diverge from EU regulations in these areas, the document makes clear that "choosing not to pass the relevant legislation would have consequences for market access, security co-operation or the frictionless border".

    The document also commits the government to step up preparedness for a no-deal scenario, as one of a range of possible outcomes, "given the short period remaining before the necessary conclusion of negotiations".

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