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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #51
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Volitions Advocate View Post
    Turns out,, its not all about elves and dwarves and fantasy stereotypes. It is a very good read. So much so that I'm already 10 chapters into the 7th book. (8th technically since I read the prequel book first) And these things aren't small books. If anybody was debating whether or not to read them, I think I'll give my recommendation.
    Like Yamatotakeru I was curious to check them out and now that I almost read up on all my current list, I might pick it up next! Thanks Advoc!

  2. #52
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2004
    Reviving from the dead - Just wrapped up The Warded Man by Peter V. Brett and started really good but got a bit eh towards the end.

    I love the premise and there's definitely a thought put into the Corelings, Core, and where/how they came about, and I am really curious to find out. It was also interesting to see glimpse into the medieval-esque, fear-ruled society and how (realistically) messed up it is with violence or rape (hello Witcher or Game of Thrones), if tending too much towards sexism.

    HOWEVER, what starts quite interesting end very predictably trope-y by the end. The characters all grow from the typical "messed up kids" to archetypal "heroes" (tho it's kinda funny how it matches game tropes with the tank, healer/mage and bard heh). Worst is the warded man itself who goes from a little kid to superhuman powers in literally blink of an eye; I know the book skips like a decade but still, the transition was pretty jarring (I didn't think the brief episode in the desert was sufficient to explain it).

    Will I continue on book two? Kinda want to. Still curious about the coreling mythos, warded man's link to the creatures, and the mentions of ancient technology, but I also fear the books will just get more and more predictably tropy which is kinda boring to me personally.

    ----------

    Also I got some 70 pages into The Eye of the World (The Wheel of Time) and it was starting pretty good, just got to the bit where main cast left their home and just arrived at first town but then my library lease ended and I had to return it :| The book is apparently in high demand, a bummer given how thick it is, and it reads kinda slow (especially the "mythical/prophetic/lore" descriptions I tend to gloss over)
    Last edited by Yakoob; 22nd Sep 2013 at 12:55.

  3. #53
    Cuddly little misanthropic hate machine
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Location: someplace better than this
    God my reading habits have gone to shit. I never finish books anymore. Hell, I'll get a book out to start it, and never even start it. I'll read 20 pages then let a book sit for two weeks.

    I gotta fix this somehow. Reading used to be so important to me.

  4. #54
    Still Subjective
    Registered: Dec 1999
    Location: Idiocy will never die
    I find the same thing.

    I started The Book of Skulls, Snow Crash, Flow My Tears The Policeman Said and The Demolished Man in the last few months.

    Snow Crash is the only one I'll finish soon and it's the last one I started.
    Telepathy is not mind reading. It is the direct linking... ...of nervous systems... ...separated by space.

  5. #55
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2008
    I've always been terrible at finishing books. I'm STILL reading Nostromo and it's STILL one of the best books I've ever read, and I plan to eventually get through everything written by Joseph Conrad.

    This is the shit for me when it comes to fiction:
    Mrs Gould knew the history of the San Tomé mine. Worked in the early days mostly by means of lashes on the backs of slaves, its yield had been paid for in its own weight of human bones. Whole tribes of Indians had perished in the exploitation; and then the mine was abandoned, since with this primitive method it had ceased to make a profitable return, no matter how many corpses were thrown into its maw.
    ...
    But afterwards another government bethought itself of that valuable asset. It was an ordinary Costaguana Government - the fourth in six years - but it judged of its opportunities sanely. It remembered the San Tomé mine with a secret conviction of its worthlessness in their own hands, but with an ingenious insight into the various uses a silver mine can be put to, apart from the sordid process of extracting the metal from under the ground. The father of Charles Gould, for a long time one of the most wealthy merchants of Costaguana, had already lost a considerable part of his fortune in forced loans to the successive Governments. He was a man of calm judgment, who never dreamed of pressing his claims; and when, suddenly, the perpetual concession of the San Tomé mine was offered to him in full settlement, his alarm became extreme.
    Last edited by Neb; 22nd Sep 2013 at 21:22.

  6. #56
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Quote Originally Posted by dethtoll View Post
    God my reading habits have gone to shit. I never finish books anymore. Hell, I'll get a book out to start it, and never even start it. I'll read 20 pages then let a book sit for two weeks.
    I've been the same way for the past few years. I've listened to a lot of audiobooks (while walking) instead. But this summer I actually read two entire physical paper books.

    Zombie Spaceship Wasteland, by Patton Oswalt

    Autobiography by my favourite stand-up comedian. Highlights include his stories about working at a movie theatre with a bunch of crazy lunatics, and spending a terrible week in a Canadian small-town comedy club where no one liked his jokes. There are also some completely fictional chapters, like the one which is just punch-up notes for a hilariously terrible movie script.

    The Fault in our Stars, by John Green

    Young adult novel about a 16 year old girl with lung cancer, who falls in love with an equally cancer-ridden boy. As an adult man I should probably be all eyerolls about this one, but it somehow managed to be both heartwarming and tragic. Really well written, and not as heavy as the premise implies.

  7. #57
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    I read many books.

    Currently I am reading books of dinosaurs. I am learning many facts (of dinosaurs).

  8. #58
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by dethtoll View Post
    God my reading habits have gone to shit. I never finish books anymore. Hell, I'll get a book out to start it, and never even start it. I'll read 20 pages then let a book sit for two weeks.

    I gotta fix this somehow. Reading used to be so important to me.
    Used to never read books when I was younger but now I got an almost daily routine: I wake up early, while its still chilly and cloudy outside, brew a fresh cup of tea with milk, grab a cookie, and sit down to read for an hour.

    It's literally my favorite and most relaxing part of the day. And weird fusion of similar habits of living in north Ireland and India - working on my masters at starbucks with a hot coffee and rain outside, mixed with the obligatory milky chai and cookie to jump start the day the maid made for us every morning

  9. #59
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2007
    Location: Alberta, Canada
    Koob,

    When I read through the WOT books I alternated back and forth between the audios and the books when I was at work. Sometimes at work I could read, and other times I could pack it on my phone and listen. I suppose it helps with the more long winded parts.

    You're just getting to the good stuff. The later books get a little big too big for their own good, but I'm on book 10 now and it seems to be getting back down to the stuff that made it great. Book 5 seems to be the hard part. at least it was for me, necessary for the story, but pretty dry. Then it picks back up afterwards.

    I've also been looking on ebay, and so long as you're not buying a first printing or a signed copy, they seem to be pretty cheap. like 3 - 8 dollars for a hardcover.

  10. #60
    've always been terrible at finishing books. I'm STILL reading Nostromo and it's STILL one of the best books I've ever read, and I plan to eventually get through everything written by Joseph Conrad.
    And I thought I'm the only one still alive who loves this book . Nostromo really is one of the greats. Something I want to reread in the future. I also plan to check out everything by Conrad, though it's difficult to get some of his books where I live, due to the price .

    Right now I'm reading Gene Wolfe's Soldier of the Mist and I love it to bits.

  11. #61
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Volitions Advocate View Post
    Koob, ....

    After reading bit more about it, Im actually pretty discouraged by the series length and slow pace. Personally, I really dislike big and long epics, perhaps because of my bad experience being forced to read many such long-winded Polish novels at school when I was younger. Hence why I've been having a hard time with my foray into Fantasy land, seems like good half follow that "5 books of 1000pages epic tale, wait till book 3 for the really good parts!" format; and WOT seems even worse at that.

    Not criticizing that style, but just not my cup of tea; I prefer briefer and faster moving (not the same as actiony) books

  12. #62
    Member
    Registered: Oct 2002
    Location: BFE
    I'm reading through WOT one last time to have the complete experience as I go in to the last and final (finally!) book. I started out loving the series with how complicated it was and I really liked some of the character arcs and hated others. On this read through, I'm really noticing a lot of holes and sloppy writing- I think it's mostly because I'm a more mature reader and my tastes have changed. While it's amazing how Jordan has kept such a huge complicated story together, I know the story pretty well (I've read some of the early ones 6-8 times over the years), so it's easier to see the cracks in the dam. There's lots of repetition to make sure you're keeping up, and characters become stereotypes and caricatures of themselves just so you can remember who they are.
    Also Jordan has this really aggravating habit of inserting a sentence withing a sentence that throws me for a loop every time. Usually the inserted sentence has nothing to do with the original, and you have to re-read the thing several times to figure out what he's talking about. Maybe this isn't a problem for a lot of big fantasy readers because they mostly skim sentences anyway, but it bugs the crap out of me.

    Jordan himself said somewhere that he deliberately started the series out with recognizable tropes and settings to help the new reader feel comfortable and get them hooked on the characters before he takes it in the direction he wants to go. That's why you've got the Mountains of Mist, Mount Dhoom, the stereotypical adopted kid way out in the sticks, the flight from the Two Rivers, etc... He then absolutely takes things in his own direction, which is really interesting and different. It ends up kind of like the fantasy version of Downton Abbey.

    So, I guess, take that for what it's worth to help decide if you want to soldier on or not.

    I read The Warded Man quite a while ago. I'll probably read the next book in the series some time, but I get the feeling the story is going places that I'm not all that interested in. I would have liked the story arc of the first book to be expanded into a whole trilogy. Kind of like the Mistborn books- I just couldn't bring myself to finish the last one because the story just got less and less interesting.
    In The Warded Man, I'm afraid that the demons were going in a way that is a pet peeve of mine. It's done in books and movies all the time, where the enemy is way too overpowered, and there's just no way anybody could actually survive them. The first couple that are killed take forever to get. Then the story needs to move along and all of a sudden everybody is one-shotting them left and right. The Warded Man didn't get to that point, but that's where it looks to me where it's going.

  13. #63
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2004
    Re warded man Book 1 demon killing: err it totally gets to that point. Arlen is squashing demon heads with his bare arms, and even the villagers are killing them in one hit with the warded spears

    And I agree. This was the main peeve of mine too, what started pretty interesting has turned farther generic fantasy and the whole story seems to be heading in an utterly predictable direction of epic man vs evil tale :/

  14. #64
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Yakoob View Post
    err it totally gets to that point. Arlen is squashing demon heads with his bare arms, and even the villagers are killing them in one hit with the warded spears
    But do they first say "We barely were able to handle one, how on earth are we going to handle this many?" right before successfully doing just that?

    I love Conservation of Ninjutsu!

  15. #65
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2004
    warded man Book 1 again yes everyone is shitting their pants and the narrator is talking about the huge ten feet beasts with armored skin and talons sharp as dethtolls accusatory occam razor. Two pages later they're blasting them left and right. Granted they take casualties but it all still does pull the 180 because you know, magic spear of +3 against deamonspawn

  16. #66
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2004
    I recently started on World War Z and I can't put it down, it's quite awesome. I think I like it so much because it reminds me a lot of the academic case studies from my Ethnic Conflict studies, it's just like that but... with zombies! Stuff like how it afffected the Israel and Palestine relations for instance, quite interesting and believable. Well researched, too.

  17. #67
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2003
    Location: UK
    I've also been re-reading the Wheel of Time novels, and have just about soldiered through the slowness of books 7 - 10. Things have definitely started to pick up in Book 11, and I'm on 13 now and finding if fun again (finally). I'm hoping to pick up Book 14 on Kindle in the New Year.

    One thing about the Wheel of Time is that, because of the sheer number of characters, Jordan has to constantly remind you who the minor characters are, which increases the size of the books a lot. Also, it is difficult as an author to have so many characters and give them distinct personalities, so they tend to shift towards steorotypes.

    I'm currently reading "Towers of Midnight", and in-between this Peter Hart's "The Great War", which is doing a good job of explaining why the war tactics were chosen even though they would cost such a huge number of lives.

  18. #68
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    I feel so serious and stuffy but I am reading The Blind Watchmaker, written by the Wickedest Man On Earth, since Hitchens died.

    Lots of eye opening stuff about the mechanisms of natural selection et al but I must say, Dawkins could have used a more insistent editor. Still, considering how old this information is it's past due for me to do some catching up. So many creationists to correct...

  19. #69
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    If it's any consolation, I read more non-fiction & textbooks (for "fun") than fiction these days. You're not alone.

  20. #70
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    No. Now I just want to kill myself.

  21. #71
    Cuddly little misanthropic hate machine
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Location: someplace better than this

  22. #72
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2007
    Location: Alberta, Canada
    Related, although some here many not care. I'm saddened by this, if it weren't for this guy and Michael Crichton, I probably would never have turned into much of a fiction reader.

    Tom Clancy dies at 66.

    That's way too young.

  23. #73
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    IIRC I've read 1 or 2 of the Jack Ryan novels. Remembered liking them. RIP Clancy.

  24. #74
    verbose douchebag
    Registered: Apr 2002
    Location: Lyon, France
    I've decided to read the Stieg Larsson Millennium trilogy on account of really loving Fincher's GwtDT. I'm liking it a lot, barring one very odd detail where the author goes into great detail about the type of Apple iBook everyone has, or wants. I know part of it is to provide a narrative for Salander's attention to detail and technical chops (not entirely helped by adding periods to acronyms such as R.A.M., which just looks odd, despite technically being correct), but it jarred me out of the flow of the scene. Still, everything else appears to be fine. They left out quite a few details in the film.

  25. #75
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2007
    Location: Alberta, Canada
    They're fantastic books. I dove into them straight after reading all of the Hannibal Lecter books. I was on a detective / violent crime kind of kick.

    If you get the chance, see if you can get a hold of the audios as well. Simon Vance is the reader and the man is better than Stephen Fry.

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