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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #126
    Cuddly little misanthropic hate machine
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Location: someplace better than this
    Be interesting to hear the justification for that.

  2. #127
    Quote Originally Posted by Queue View Post
    Unless they started writing pre-1970, don't do it to yourself.
    I'm already doing it to myself - and enjoying it. I am curious, though, to know why you would say such a thing!?

  3. #128
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2006
    Location: Hamilton, New Zealand
    Yeah, there are plenty of great contemporary female authors around. Some of my recently read favourites would be Jennifer Egan (A Visit from the Goon Squad), Zadie Smith (White Teeth) and Karen Russell (Swamplandia!). I've also just ordered The Luminaries by Elanor Catton and am very much looking forward to digging into it (it's an 800+ page epic set during the gold rush years of pioneer New Zealand).

    What are some of the authors and books you've been reading in particular, qolelis?
    Last edited by Angel Dust; 23rd Oct 2013 at 16:54.

  4. #129
    Quote Originally Posted by Angel Dust
    What are some of the authors and books you've been reading in particular, qolelis?
    Since most of the books I read come from the local library, they might not be the most modern, cutting edge titles, but anyway: Right now I'm reading:
    • Beate Grimsrud (post-1970), Norwegian writer with a pretty unique style. I can especially recommend the following (I'm not sure if the last two have been translated into English):
      - "En dåre fri" (I think the English title is "A Fool[,] Free")
      - "Jag smyger förbi en yxa", which I'm reading right now
      - "Har någon sett mig någon annanstans"
    • Herta Müller (post-1970), born in Romania under the Ceaușescu regime, which she writes about in "Der König verneigt sich und tötet", which I planned on reading in German, but ended up reading only in Swedish (I probably realized how bad my German really is),
    • Sylvia Plath (pre-1970), so far I've only read some of her short stories and "The Bell Jar" (of course?) (in Swedish, though; I looked for the English original, but couldn't find it).


    I also borrowed a collection of newspaper columns, which was the only thing I could find, by Wisława Szymborska, but that particular one wasn't my style at all, though I am going to look further.

    Thanks for your tips, by the way, I'm making a mental note to check them out next time.

  5. #130
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2008
    Location: on a mission to civilize
    Quote Originally Posted by dethtoll View Post
    Be interesting to hear the justification for that.
    Well, you see, as everyone knows, women are naturally deceitful – it's been documented…by a Senator from Tennessee. So because of this, it's predetermined that they are incapable of writing honestly. But, women like Dorothy Parker, Shirley Jackson, Lillian Hellman, Joyce Carol Oates, Margaret Atwood, and, to an extent, Sylvia Plath (though she was much better at baking) all wrote pre-1970 and were masters of letters because they knew how to write like a man.

    That's all I was saying.

    But, I would never intentionally avoid a writer because she is a woman, like qolelis there. That's just sexist and wrong.

    Shame on you, qolelis.


    [edit] And who the hell would read a foreign women? They already speak enough gobbledygook without writing it down. READ AMERICAN, DAMMIT!
    Last edited by Queue; 24th Oct 2013 at 23:29.

  6. #131
    Cuddly little misanthropic hate machine
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Location: someplace better than this
    As usual, never expect a straight answer from Queue. Pun intended.

  7. #132
    verbose douchebag
    Registered: Apr 2002
    Location: Lyon, France

  8. #133
    Thing What Kicks
    Registered: Apr 2004
    Location: London
    Currently reading John Dies at the End.
    Should I spoiler-tag that?

    Very fun, off-the-wall stuff. I'm reading it with an aim to see the movie afterwards, but it's a thoroughly enjoyable romp on its own. Long too.
    More stuff in the same vein as Richard Kadrey's Sandman Slim and Charles Stross' Laundry books, with a bit of Burroughs thrown in for good measure.

  9. #134
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2006
    Location: Washington DC
    I just finished reading Blindsight, and I'll be damned if it isn't the most thought-provoking (in several aspects) piece of sci-fi I've read in the last couple of years. Has anyone else ever heard of this book? The author apparently uploaded the full text to his site due to issues with availability of the print version, so that's a whole novel right there.

    Basic premise: Humanity discovers an alien vessel in the solar system. A team of transhumans is sent to make first contact, and finds an alien species that is actually alien. The core theme to it is a very interesting twist that I'd rather not give away, so I'll just say that it's definitely worth reading.

  10. #135
    I've read Blindsight. It's indeed very thought provoking and very well researched. It's HARD sci-fi, so I can't say I understood all of it, but some of the images the book provokes are stuck in my head to this day. Definitely worth a look. And yeah, it's totally free on Peter Watts' page

    Just finished Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy. After The Road, No Country for Old Men and THIS I can honestly say McCarthy's one of ma favorites and I'll try to collect anything written by him. Blood Meridian is a masterpiece of horror (I guess) about a 1850s american group of mercenary scalp-hunters. It's beyond gruesome and when I found out that a lot of the events mentioned in the book actually happened, and that most of the characters actually existed (especially one in particular) it felt kind of like discovering that there was a Count Dracula in real life .

  11. #136
    verbose douchebag
    Registered: Apr 2002
    Location: Lyon, France
    I'm reading Cloud Atlas. It's great so far, much better than the film, but that's books in general IME.

  12. #137
    New Member
    Registered: Nov 2013
    Location: United States
    I just got done reading "Fantastic Voyage" by Isaac Asimov. It's about Soviet scientists who have made the technology to become so small that they go inside the human bloodstream and enter a blood clot in someone's brain. It was pretty awesome.

  13. #138
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2008
    Location: on a mission to civilize
    Never heard of it.

    Wow. They should make that into a movie!

  14. #139
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    There aren't nearly enough movies about Soviet hijinks come to think of it, real, fiction, fantasy, or otherwise.
    They basically pulled the greatest troll of the 20th Century for 3/4 of a century, much of which was under wraps at the time. Surely there are some good stories to tell or make up out of it.

  15. #140
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2013
    Location: Czech Republic
    Wow. They should make that into a movie!
    Actually there is a movie based on this. I saw it like ages ago though I remember it being quite good.

  16. #141
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    That's quite a find.

  17. #142
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2002
    Location: Landahn
    Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah

  18. #143
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2008
    Location: on a mission to civilize
    Quote Originally Posted by LoLion View Post
    Actually there is a movie based on this. I saw it like ages ago though I remember it being quite good.
    You're making that up.

  19. #144
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2013
    Location: Czech Republic
    Nope.

    I watched it in the early 90s, but I distinctly remember my amazement as I watched the protagonists fight off hordes of antibodies and leukocytes while they piloted their submarine through some guy’s veins before getting to his brain and fixing it with wrenches.

    Go watch it yourself if you don’t believe me


    Also I am currently reading War of Honor by David Weber. Its a part of very long military sci-fi series which basically re-enacts the Napoleonic Wars in space.

  20. #145
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2007
    Location: Sevastapol Station
    There is a newer movie than that with the same premise. Somewhere in the back of my mind I get this impression that Jeff Bridges was part of it but that's probably wrong. In the movie I saw, the submarine dude was accidentally injected into a man, when he was supposed to be injected into a rabbit for some scientific project. The name of the movie completely escapes me. EDIT: Also there was a choose your own adventure book that skyfed the premise too EDIT EDIT: AHA it was Dennis Quaid, not Jeff Bridges, and the movie was called Innerspace. Looks like it was a comedy, not sci-fi. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzkcSwlrdgg

    I'm looking for a couple of novels. I remember when I was a kid I wanted to see the movie Species really badly because I loved Alien and heard that Giger had something to do with the movie. Well if you've seen any of the species movies you know that they are terrible. Many may not agree with me but I found it awkward and disturbing. I'm not a really big fan of movies with a lot of gratuitous sex in them, and when you combine that with aliens and violence, its just... well awkward.

    I've just learned that there were novel adaptations of the first 2 movies, and that they are possibly quite readable. Apparently they are out of print and I'm not sure where to find them. I would prefer this to the movies because I like the concept of the sci fi and the horror. I just don't feel like explaining to my wife or my kids why I'm watching naked women have sex and kill people. My dad rented the first movie and let me watch it with him when I was 11 and it kinda screwed me up a bit at the time (it's the only movie of the series I've actually watched, and I've seen scenes here and there of the 2nd one, but couldn't stomach the whole thing). Not really willing to repeat that mistake with my kids.

    I remember reading the novelization of Face/Off and remembering it was really good, and better than the already great movie, so I'm thinking that these books might be decent. Any ideas where I could find them?

  21. #146
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    I immediately remembered Innerspace. Also has Martin Short and Meg Ryan. It's on the line between comedy and scifi. There's still some drama and thriller in it. I mean the Martin Short bits are comedy, the Dennis Quaid bits are dramatic.

    For the record, I'm reading Plato's Republic for my reading circle.

  22. #147
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2007
    Location: Sevastapol Station
    Oye! Good luck with that one. I just read it last year for a Political Science class. I'm not the biggest fan of Socrates.

  23. #148
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2013
    Location: Czech Republic
    I always thought that the “dialogue form” in which Plato wrote his stuff made it relatively accessible – at least I actually quite enjoyed the Republic when I read it for a political philosophy class back in the day. In this particular book Plato among other things says that physical labour is bad for your soul and should be avoided as much as possible… probably one of the best career recommendations I ever received!

  24. #149
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2008
    Location: on a mission to civilize
    Quote Originally Posted by LoLion View Post
    Nope.

    I watched it in the early 90s, but I distinctly remember my amazement as I watched the protagonists fight off hordes of antibodies and leukocytes while they piloted their submarine through some guy’s veins before getting to his brain and fixing it with wrenches.

    Go watch it yourself if you don’t believe me
    That's amazing! I probably would have watched it in the 70s, on television, myself. This Isaac Asimov sounds like some sort of literary genius or something. I'm surprised he's not a household name.

  25. #150
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Quote Originally Posted by VA
    Oye! Good luck with that one.
    I read it before in my pol theory & ancient phil classes too, so I know generally what's going on. The dialog form does dramatize it, and that makes it more fun to read. I'll say this... After you've been out of school for some years working, or in my case anyway, you realize how refreshing it is to read pure theory and think about the fundamentals in life. So I'm happy to be starting this phil reading club. The fact I'm in Japan and need some English-language outlets & something familiar & complex to latch on to is part of that too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Queue View Post
    That's amazing! I probably would have watched it in the 70s, on television, myself. This Isaac Asimov sounds like some sort of literary genius or something. I'm surprised he's not a household name.
    Except he kind of is. Well he was, as much as Bradbury, Heinlein & Dick at least. We had to read him in high school. Remember Will Smith making I Robot? Azimov literally wrote the rules on dealing with conscious robots.

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