TTLG|Thief|Bioshock|System Shock|Deus Ex|Mobile
Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 76 to 100 of 128

Thread: Wolfenstein: The New Order - from the makers of Riddick: Butcher Bay & The Darkness 1

  1. #76
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2002
    Location: Landahn
    Yeah, I do generally like Eurogamer for giving lower than average scores in most cases - they actually make use of the full 10-point scale for their reviews! I get the impression, though, sometimes they just have lower scores for the sake of it. This may be one of those times, no idea.

    I just can't imagine the game being barely better than average, given the pedigree of the developers - I absolutely love what the Riddicks and The Darkness do to stand out from the usual shooter crowd, and this Wolfenstein seems to be doing much the same things.

    Eh, well, we'll know soon enough ourselves, I guess.

  2. #77
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2007
    Location: Finger paintings of the insane
    Seriously, this sounded like a no brainer. The devs with a nearly perfect pedigree, AND the awesome i.p.? Shit, please be good...
    deth, please report back! We don't always agree 100%, but I trust ya` on this one.

  3. #78
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    This ones on the summer sale list for me. Now to just wait for the summer sale to start.

  4. #79
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Eh, the Steam summer sale is like a month away. I wouldn't expect Wolf:TNO to show up in it. If it does it's going to be at like -25% at most.

  5. #80
    It's Zenimax, it might be $5 in a month. They're pretty aggressive about marking down their games.

  6. #81
    Cuddly little misanthropic hate machine
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Location: someplace better than this
    I admit, I was a little worried this game wouldn't be great. Perhaps my fears stemmed from Bioshock Infinite being such a crushing disappointment.

    At a 40gb install I was thinking this damn well BETTER be awesome.

    Well... it is! Aside from the cute references to Wolfenstein 3D and old-school silliness of dual-wielding shotguns the size of chainsaws there's a genuinely fun and rewarding stealth and/or action game with a neat skill tree that lets you cater to your playstyle. There's also a very grim feel to it that doesn't feel too forced most of the time. Though it's usually interrupted by a couple of gratuitous sex scenes.

  7. #82
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2007
    Location: Finger paintings of the insane
    Try dual-wielding 2 side-by-side coach guns someday. It's fun when you get bored coyote hunting...

    I'm an Android™

  8. #83
    PC Gamering Smartey Man
    I <3 consoles and gamepads

    Registered: Aug 2007
    Location: New Zealand
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Moyer View Post
    It's Zenimax, it might be $5 in a month. They're pretty aggressive about marking down their games.
    So is that why we've yet to any see decent discounts on Skyrim's DLCs?

  9. #84
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2011
    Finished it on Uber last night, it feels like something's missing.

    It's pretty obvious large chucks of the game have been cut out, and as a consequence, New Order has major pacing issues. It definitely doesn't live up to Riddick and doesn't have anything as memorable as the couch scene in The Darkness. The story is poor; lengthy dull cutscenes interrupt everything, and you can't skip them. I'm completely indifferent to the characters. The load times are long, so you feel less inclined to experiment.

    I hate that Bethesda forced MachineGames to shoehorn elements from Dishonored into the game. The Hound-Pits hub knock-off is dreadful, and tasks you with fetch quests like "find me some mold," and "have you see my welder?" It's awful. The stealth is overpowered - if you spam melee you're unstoppable. Rather than hiding in shadows it works on a line of sight basis like Dishonored only with poor a.i. The shooting is good, but the weapons are standard-fare and there's not enough run-and-gun moments. It's clear they want the cutting tool to be your Gravity-gun, but it's not as useful and pretty underdeveloped. However, the art is pretty awesome and I like how they handled enemy respawns, the perk and health systems.

    A mixed bag for sure. The "old-school" tags are super misleading. It's not. Serious Sam 3, Hard Reset, Necrovision and Shadow Warrior did a better job capturing what 90's shooters were like. Most of the levels are either narrow corridors with a couple of optional rooms (which is fine, but it's not open) or boxy, heavily signaled battle arenas - there's little to no backtracking, and the adventure elements suck. It all feels a bit hodgepodge and lacks an identity.

    There's a moment where B.J. has to use the biggest gun in world. It's pretty telling just as you're about to shoot, the game takes away control from you and shows a cutscene of him firing the gun.

  10. #85
    Quote Originally Posted by EvaUnit02 View Post
    So is that why we've yet to any see decent discounts on Skyrim's DLCs?
    I bought all of them for 50% off shortly after they came out. Kind of surprised the DLC and/or the Legendary edition haven't been in a 75% off sale yet, though.

  11. #86
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2004
    Location: Reykjavík, Iceland
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tibbs View Post
    Finished it on Uber last night, it feels like something's missing.
    Manual savegames?

  12. #87
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    Is there manual saves in standard difficulty modes? Or is this another console port inspired, no manual saving style game?

    If the latter then grrr.

  13. #88
    Cuddly little misanthropic hate machine
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Location: someplace better than this
    It's definitely a checkpoint type of game, probably the one real ding I'd give it.

  14. #89
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    Grr then.

    Though I'll stay play it.

  15. #90
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2004
    Location: Reykjavík, Iceland
    I just don't get it, what's the incentive for that design principle? Checkpoints and manual saves can co-exist, one or the other can be ignored. I would much rather want to save on my own terms based on my own play style and handicaps, rather than having a level designer dictate it, a person who has no fucking clue about the players who are as diverse as they are numerous. I'm half expecting the next gen MS Office omitting the Save and Save As options...

    Plus, manual saves are a, well, calmer way of getting past bullshit gameplay mechanics that almost all games have.

    Oh well, I might check the game out if it hits the bargain bin this summer, I'm not going to blow too much money on it because chances are I will be tearing my hair out at difficult sections. Metro 2033 pissed me off to no end and I didn't even spend my own money on it.
    Last edited by Bjossi; 26th May 2014 at 12:13.

  16. #91
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2005
    Location: Wisconsin
    I don't really care what type of save system a game uses, but if it uses auto-save/checkpoints I hope that it does it relatively regularly. If I lose more than 30 minutes of progress I usually end up quitting the game for a substantial period of time out of frustration.

  17. #92
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2004
    Location: Reykjavík, Iceland
    Don't know about Wolfy NO since it sounds like a fairly straight-forward shooter but in games like Metro 2033 it was very easy to lose 30+ minutes of progress due to inconsistent checkpoint frequency and some levels being quite open and full of little detours with goodies.

  18. #93
    Quote Originally Posted by Bjossi View Post
    I just don't get it, what's the incentive for that design principle?
    Checkpoints makes saving and loading simpler for the developer to handle, as they don't have to check for enemy or player placement, and in some cases pickups can be omitted as well (usually for a point-of-no-return checkpoint).

    When a player saves at a checkpoint, the developer can be certain that several conditions are have a preset value, such as player location, what enemies are alive/dead, which doors are locked and so on. Mostly a console concern for older generations, but less stuff to save means less storage space used. Less stuff to load means less stuff that can go wrong in loading, if it's properly implemented.

    For a level designer, checkpoint saving means a simpler time at implementing a linear experience and pace it. If they do it well, they use the checkpoints to make sure that the gameplay is balanced between action and non-action. Used well, checkpoints also ensure that the player won't have to spend too much time to get back to where they were if they fail a segment.

  19. #94
    Cuddly little misanthropic hate machine
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Location: someplace better than this
    TNO's checkpoints are a bit strange. They barely trigger at all during the home base sequences but go off at least every 2nd or 3rd room or so during main gameplay.

  20. #95
    PC Gamering Smartey Man
    I <3 consoles and gamepads

    Registered: Aug 2007
    Location: New Zealand
    What was the last AAA shooter that did allow saving anywhere? After FEAR in 2005, I draw a blank. EDIT: Just remembered the Stalker series and Bioshock 1 & 2, but I've got nothing after that.

  21. #96
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2004
    Location: Reykjavík, Iceland
    They're not really AAA games but Serious Sam 3 and (I read) Shadow Warrior got manual saving. It just so happens Serious Sam 3 is the most recently released game I have played to date, and it turns 3 years old next November.

    Despite my bad eyesight I could always enjoy games in the past thanks to being able to save my progress, because I tend to die more than others. In modern games with their fancy, complicated graphics I need this kind of hand holding more than ever before, and that is when these bastards take away the possibility. I could probably still play many of these games but I just don't feel like going through all the needless frustration of repeatedly dying/failing before making it to the next checkpoint until I have brute force memorized the situation to the point of looking like an aimbot.

    EDIT
    HL2 Ep1 (2006) and Ep2 (2007) (Has it really been 7 years since the last HL? Fucking hell.) both have manual saving. Same for Crysis (2007). Dead Space 1 (2008) and 2 (2011) kind of have manual saving, you can save at each terminal as often as you like.
    Last edited by Bjossi; 26th May 2014 at 18:43.

  22. #97
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    Just sounds like lazy programming to me. Sure you'd have to put together a function to save the current state + location of all enemies, npcs, items that way, but it's not rocket science.

  23. #98
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2004
    Location: Reykjavík, Iceland
    Regardless of the savegame type, you want a consistent state save / load. You don't want the likes of Dead Space where dead bodies are reset to their original locations upon reloading a save, or the likes of STALKER SoC where reloading a savegame alarms nearby enemies and even tells them your location. That sort of thing goes against the very reason why we save our games: to store the state the world is in at the time.

    The only difference between manual saving and checkpoints should be the trigger, the procedure that follows should be identical. Of course you could optimize checkpoints based on knowledge of the level to limit the amount of state that gets stored, but that is actually a lot more work than setting up a generic, all-inclusive save / load system and the savings are quite unimportant on modern systems.

  24. #99
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Managers deciding what features to spend programmer time on is not laziness on the part of said programmers. Even if they're the same people.

  25. #100
    Quote Originally Posted by Bjossi View Post
    Regardless of the savegame type, you want a consistent state save / load. You don't want the likes of Dead Space where dead bodies are reset to their original locations upon reloading a save, or the likes of STALKER SoC where reloading a savegame alarms nearby enemies and even tells them your location. That sort of thing goes against the very reason why we save our games: to store the state the world is in at the time.

    The only difference between manual saving and checkpoints should be the trigger, the procedure that follows should be identical. Of course you could optimize checkpoints based on knowledge of the level to limit the amount of state that gets stored, but that is actually a lot more work than setting up a generic, all-inclusive save / load system and the savings are quite unimportant on modern systems.
    You could always just do a memory dump if you wanted to, but that's not time or space efficient (and stuff can go wrong while doing so).

    With a manual save you need the complete state of every object whether active or not, unless you're happy with dead enemies reappearing at their spawn location instead of where they died and so on. For a npc this should include a full AI state (path finding, combat state, etc.), which can go horribly wrong if one variable doesn't get saved/loaded/reinitialized properly. While testing is (should be) part of development, most non-simple systems have corner cases you can't easily test for. With more complex systems you get more of these corner cases and you get a higher risk of a corner case causing a critical error. With enough time you can eliminate many of them, but you still have to pay wages for that time spent.

    If they're owned by a publisher, a developer would likely have gotten a "You have {x amount of time}, you have to implement {features}, it needs to run on {system}"-message when asked/told to do a project. If they're independent it's more likely to be a case of "We have {x amount of money}, we need to include what we can afford". Checkpoint saving is fairly easy to implement and fairly low risk compared to a manual save. You basically just need to save player state (including any story choices) in many cases, as opposed to player + object & npc states for the entire level.

    If you want a shiny new graphics engine with lots of fancy new buzzword stuff, you may not have the resources to also include a manual save option. Unless you're basically just doing a "save player location + inventory/level + mission progress"-only kind of save as is common in open world sandbox games (they often seem to spawn you in a predetermined safe spot too, regardless of where you actually were when you saved). And that's basically a checkpoint save anyway.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •