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Thread: There's an OCULUS RIFT on my FACE :D

  1. #51
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2003
    Location: Jafaville New Zealand

  2. #52
    Cuddly little misanthropic hate machine
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Location: someplace better than this
    I am not clicking that. I don't need to spend half an hour watching stupid dorks scream themselves silly at another one of these shitty "horror" games that knock off Slenderman and Amnesia and whatever other shitpiles pass for horror these days.

  3. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by dethtoll View Post
    I am not clicking that. I don't need to spend half an hour watching stupid dorks scream themselves silly at another one of these shitty "horror" games that knock off Slenderman and Amnesia and whatever other shitpiles pass for horror these days.
    Hey dethy you ever play cory in the house? scariest game ever i totes shit my pants and had nightmares for weeks

  4. #54
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    Can't remember whether you've still got the Oculus Rift, henke, or whether you take requests, but if so, do you want to give Dear Esther and/or Gone Home a spin, provided they work? Their slow pace should be well suited to the OR.

  5. #55
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Yeah I'll be holding on to the Rift for a while still. Probably until someone pries it from my cold dead fingers, or politely asks me to bring it back to work. We'll see.

    Unfortunately the OR development on Gone Home has been canceled, and I'm not too keen on putting myself through the experience of playing any more games without native support.

    I wonder if games without native support ever will be good and playable on the Rift. Maybe once the Vireio Perception app has been further developed and you're running it on a really powerful computer, perhaps. But some things, like Stalker, I believe would need some serious redesigning when it comes to the GUI to be playble, even on the higher resolution consumer versions of the Rift. The ammo counters and inventory are too tiny and too far in the corners of the screen to be readable. I think the Rift will be mainly usable for newer games designed for it. For older games it'll take some work from either the developers or dedicated fans to get them into a state where they'd be preferable to simply sticking with the ol' monitor-version.

  6. #56
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    That's understandable. There's a Unity remake of Dear Esther in the works (for licencing reasons of some sort, I believe), and it seems that version is likely to support Oculus Rift.

  7. #57
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2008
    Quote Originally Posted by Thirith View Post
    Sir, You Are Being Hunted, which already works with TrackIR, [...]
    For real? *reinstalls*

  8. #58
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    Oh, and henke, have you checked out "The Entertainment", part of Kentucky Route Zero? It supports Oculus Rift.

    http://kentuckyroutezero.com/the-entertainment/

  9. #59
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    That was interesting.

    If anyone's got more suggestions for cool Oculus Rift ready stuff, don't hold back!

  10. #60
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2007
    Location: Finger paintings of the insane
    Quote Originally Posted by N'Al View Post
    Naturally, the next game you should play on the Rift is Zelda.
    THAT, is awesome. Thanks for the linkage!

  11. #61
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Maybe I'm finally getting used to it, or maybe I finally got the configuration right and changing the Rift's A-lenses for the B-lenses did the trick, but I just played a good 30-45 minutes of HL2 without feeling particularly nauseous. This game is goddamn glorious in VR. Shooting feels so satisfying. When I shoot someone in this and watch them slump to the ground I feel like I'm ACTUALLY TAKING A MAN'S LIFE ITS AWESOME!

    Here's some screenies, from HL2 and some other games.


    When you tilt your head to one side and close one eye you can actually look down the sights. Amazing.




    Out retrieving lost cargo in Lunar Flight.


    Experimental surgery in Surgeon Sim.

  12. #62
    ZylonBane
    Registered: Sep 2000
    Location: ZylonBane
    How does the head tracking in HL2 integrate with mouse aiming? Seems like they'd combine into a confusing mess of conflicting inputs.

  13. #63
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Actually they're separate. You move the gun with the mouse, and you can look around without affecting the aim. Which is great not only because it feels more realistic, but also it lets you do things like keep your gun trained on a door or a corner where you think an enemy might show up while at the same time throwing a glance over your shoulder to make sure nothing creeping up behind you. It's all remarkably intuitive.

    This video shows it off quite well.

  14. #64
    ZylonBane
    Registered: Sep 2000
    Location: ZylonBane
    Ah, yeah, that seems like the sort of functionality that would require full game integration to pull off. I guess with less-supported FPS games there basically won't be any head tracking.

  15. #65
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    Assuming that the headset is taking over the entire role of mouse look, how do you do quick 180 degree turns?

    Oh, and with the Rift, it looks like wand style controllers finally have a good use on the PC.

  16. #66
    ZylonBane
    Registered: Sep 2000
    Location: ZylonBane
    Quote Originally Posted by Renzatic View Post
    Assuming that the headset is taking over the entire role of mouse look, how do you do quick 180 degree turns?
    If you watch the linked video, it seems that the mouse still controls your face, while the head tracking controls where you aim. Kind of like the original System Shock's free-floating aim cursor.

    Though if it's the opposite of that, I don't think I'd care for it.

  17. #67
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    I just now watched it, and yeah, I think it's the other way around. You mouselook with your head, and aim the gun with your mouse. To use a more modern example than System Shock, I'd say it's fairly similar to the control scheme in Metroid Prime 3, but the reticle movement/turning radius is more tightly focused in the center of the screen.

  18. #68
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Quote Originally Posted by Renzatic View Post
    I just now watched it, and yeah, I think it's the other way around. You mouselook with your head, and aim the gun with your mouse.
    That's a bingo!

    Strike Suit Zero is on sale today and apparently has OR support (tho it's still in open beta), gonna give that a go.

  19. #69
    verbose douchebag
    Registered: Apr 2002
    Location: Lyon, France
    Quote Originally Posted by henke View Post
    When I shoot someone in this and watch them slump to the ground I feel like I'm ACTUALLY TAKING A MAN'S LIFE ITS AWESOME!
    And just like that, Henke's unbridled enthusiasm takes a turn for the sinister.

  20. #70
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    Quote Originally Posted by ZylonBane View Post
    If you watch the linked video, it seems that the mouse still controls your face, while the head tracking controls where you aim. Kind of like the original System Shock's free-floating aim cursor.

    Though if it's the opposite of that, I don't think I'd care for it.
    Not sure I understand you. Doesn't it make more sense for the view to control your, well, view, while the mouse controls your aim?

  21. #71
    ZylonBane
    Registered: Sep 2000
    Location: ZylonBane
    Quote Originally Posted by Thirith View Post
    Not sure I understand you. Doesn't it make more sense for the view to control your, well, view, while the mouse controls your aim?
    Not when it also controls the direction you move. When mouse movement is replaced with head tracking, your head basically becomes a giant analog stick. As described in this Kotaku article:
    If you move your mouse around in the middle two-thirds of the screen it doesn’t affect the camera; It just moves your crosshair. Only when the aiming reticle goes into the outer third of the screen does the camera begin to turn. Head movement also allows you to turn the camera—i.e., if you look to your left in the real world, so does Gordon's head.
    So the precision of mouse movement is gone, replaced with the "tank" controls of a gamepad.

    I'd be more happy with "mech" controls, where the M+KB operates the same as always, controlling the orientation of your body, while the head tracking allows you to look around somewhat independently of your body, but has no control over movement.

  22. #72
    Yeah that does sound awkward. So basically, if I understand correctly, you could be looking to your left and when you make your character walk he goes in that direction even though you weren't intending to, you just wanted to look in that direction but continue walking straight.

  23. #73
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2008
    From the video and the article: Nope, it doesn't seem that way. Forget the head tracking for a second. It uses practically the same mouse controls as Operation Flashpoint (aiming deadzone.) In a portion of the centre of the screen you can aim without turning your character. When you hit the limit at the edges of your vision, your whole body (and aim) turns in that direction. Now add in head tracking. If you looked over your left shoulder and moved the mouse to the right 'deadzone' limit your entire body, along with your view, would turn to the right.

    I instantly recognised the way that it works in the video from playing the first Arma game with TrackIR (head tracking peripheral). Before I bought it it wasn't entirely clear how it would work, and it's a pain in the arse playing a first person shooter with consistent tracking sensitivity. I configured it so that at the centre of aim there's a load of deceleration so that your view sticks a bit if you're trying to look ahead. I don't know whether that's something that you can do with the Rift, or whether it's needed.

    EDIT: A further thing. If what I'm saying doesn't turn out to be uninformed nonsense, and if my experience with TrackIR does apply to the tracking with Oculus Rift, the guy playing is always walking towards where he's looking only because he's spending his time trying to keep his weapon in view. Before I lowered my TrackIR sensitivity for looking straight forwards, if I turned my head and lost view of the cursor it was disorientating trying to find it again, even though you'd imagine that you should be able to feel when your own face is pointing straight forward. With the sensitivity tweaks you can feel exactly when you've 'snapped' your aim back to centre (like a mini black hole), and so actually start exploring with your head a lot more when you know how easy it is to return.

    I really need to try the Oculus Rift now.
    Last edited by Neb; 26th Feb 2014 at 14:32.

  24. #74
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    Quote Originally Posted by ZylonBane View Post
    I'd be more happy with "mech" controls, where the M+KB operates the same as always, controlling the orientation of your body, while the head tracking allows you to look around somewhat independently of your body, but has no control over movement.
    I agree in the sense that moving the mouse outside of a static deadzone being responsible for pivoting isn't the best solution, but I do think it's a better interim solution than considering the Rift as a 3rd independent point of movement bolted on top of the old kb/m standard. You have to consider what feels most natural in a setup where you're immersed in an environment that encompasses your entire field of vision, and is designed to move along with your head.

    Like I mentioned earlier, motion sickness is one of the greatest bug bears of VR. Anything that doesn't move in sync with the way you expect it to could throw off your sense of balance, your feel for the way you normally move, and make you feel ill. Tracking lag is the biggest culprit of this, but any type of movement that doesn't seem "right" will do it almost as much. The old setup will make it seem like you're a little guy in someone's head looking out through their eyes, and they're controlling a body like a mech, with upper and lower torso movements. For (obviously) mech games, that's fine. Throw people in a cockpit, and they'll immediately accept it. They have a fixed environment to orient themselves with, regardless of what's going on outside the window. But for games where it looks like standing some place on your own two feet, you automatically have certain expectations on how to interact and move about those surroundings. Throw that sense off, and it'll give people headaches and make them sick to their stomach.

    Like imagine you're able to look around freely, but your arm is stuck out right in front of you, and moving your arms also moves your eyes independently. Like you're looking off to the left, and you see someone you have to shoot to the right. You move the mouse, and suddenly your entire field of vision moves without you shifting your head or eyes about to track the reticle in the dead center of the screen. You'd always have to move your head in near perfect coordination with your mouse to keep from feeling weird.

    The perfect solution would be for the player to pivot physically to pivot ingame. But since the Rift can't track positioning down to that level of detail (as far as I know), the reticle deadzone works as a good stopgap measure, since it gives more control to your neck and eyes to look around your environment, rather than your arm.
    Last edited by Renzatic; 26th Feb 2014 at 14:28.

  25. #75
    Hmm, well said Renz.

    Quote Originally Posted by Neb
    In a portion of the centre of the screen you can aim without turning your character. When you hit the limit at the edges of your vision, your whole body (and aim) turns in that direction. Now add in head tracking. If you looked over your left shoulder and moved the mouse to the right 'deadzone' limit your entire body, along with your view, would turn to the right.
    Ah, I gotcha. So that's the bit I wasn't getting. (The deadzone aspect of the VR setup.) So until you go outside that deadzone your character won't turn in that direction then. Based on what I've now read, and the hl2 video I've now seen, that seems like a pretty good setup.

    Probably still feels 'weird' to turn your head to pan the camera rather than your mouse, but I guess after playing for a while you'd get used to it. Looked a bit goofy watching the guy mouse around to move his character's arm to shoot at something, but it actually makes sense regardless.

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