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Thread: Article on Thief Level Design

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered: Oct 2005

    Article on Thief Level Design

    Not sure if this has been posted, but here's an article I just saw posted on Gamasutra:

    http://www.gamasutra.com/blogs/Miche..._mechanics.php

  2. #2
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2011
    Location: Montpellier, France
    Yeah it's a very good and well written article, well worth a read. I had a small back & forth with the author on Twitter about the supernatural elements.

  3. #3
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2003
    Location: Norway (currently Phoenix, AZ)
    Nice article. I really enjoyed it.
    Klatremus' Supreme Thief Site - Walkthroughs, Loot Lists & Ghost Reports
    Let's Supreme Ghost Thief - YouTube Channel with Thief Let's Plays

  4. #4
    Oh, this game. It's so absorbing that when it catches you you feel the (sometimes urgent) necessity to keep deepening and scrutinizing every detail, no matter how trivial or hackneyed may seem at first. Lovely article, it thrilled me from the very beginning. .

  5. #5
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Speaking of Thief articles--and rather than start my own thread I feel like I should add this here--I stumbled into a postmortum by the coder of the Dark Engine's render code.
    http://nothings.org/gamedev/thief_rendering.html

    It's mostly technical stuff, but this one part stood out, and I saw a part of the game I hadn't noticed before (really a part of dromed where you can best see it).
    The entire space started solid, so one brush operation was "carve out a hole in this area"--in other words "change the area covered by this brush to open". For example you would use this to carve out a room. Another placed solid matter; you could use this to create a pillar. Another placed water, and another lava. Because space could be of 4 types (solid, air, water, or lava -- oh hey, the 4 classical elements!), each operation could be considered by which output type it produced.
    Even in the most mechanical guts of its rendering sourcecode (or maybe especially there), the metaphysics of the Thief universe privilges the four classical element types as the types of brushes you can make. Kind of cool little insight I had into Thief metaphysics today.
    What do you see when you turn out the lights? / I can't tell you, but I know that it's mine. (J. Lennon)

  6. #6
    Member
    Registered: May 2002
    Location: Texas
    That sounds interesting but I'm not do sure about the lava. I think technically lava is a water brush.

    There are a lot of interesting articles about Thief at Gamasutra.

  7. #7
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Well it's the thought that counts.
    Of course there's a little glitch in its reality lining up perfectly. This is still Dromed we're talking about.

  8. #8
    Member
    Registered: May 2002
    Location: Texas
    Dromed has been pretty good to me lately so I won't complain.

  9. #9
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2014
    Do undead have different AI than regular guards as the author states? I never noticed this.

  10. #10
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2011
    Location: Montpellier, France
    Zombies have duller senses overall and mostly use random patrols, at least in Cragscleft and in the Bonehoard. Haunts are very similar to Hammerites.

  11. #11
    Southquarter.com/fms
    Registered: Apr 2000
    Location: The Akkala Highlands
    I always thought zombies gave up searching for you much quicker after an alert than other AI, could be wrong on that though.

  12. #12
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2009
    Location: Argentina
    Quote Originally Posted by Brethren View Post
    I always thought zombies gave up searching for you much quicker after an alert than other AI
    They do, in fact.

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