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Thread: Status update

  1. #26
    Heh, thanks Montag.

    Kolya, I feel your pain with your colleague. I have some computer illiterate people in my family and it's a pain in the ass. I feel like me and my cousin are the only people who can actually go and repair computers (me mostly software-wise). And the worst thing is - no one even bothers to learn and I don't have patience for it.

    One of my family members wanted me to burn something to a CD because I apparently "have the skill and equipment" to do it. Like, no, you have a computer, a disc tray and a burning software so do it yourself! It's that simple! But nooooo, because they were apparently too lazy to actually search for a suitable program to use and to simply DO IT! I just...

    Apparently they were too lazy to google instructions on how to burn stuff on CDs, but weren't TOO lazy to watch TV.

    Sorry, it just makes me feel so mad. I just...I feel like I'm the only person in my family (including my cousin) intelligent enough to google what's wrong and actually fix it.

    Damn, this went longer than I expected.

  2. #27
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    Quote Originally Posted by Kolya View Post
    My colleague's contract is officially being discontinued at the end of the year and I'm glad it is. She was one of two female apprentices when I started at this job. I taught both, because no one else seemed to care. One graduated as the best of the state and left the company, the other one barely passed and was hired.
    Ever since she has required constant hand holding. There's a number of reasons for her eventual failure but the main points are that A) She is too old to learn and remember complex stuff. B) Being a coder to her is a male thing that she basically rejects. So she tried to become a designer, but her lack of basic computer skills (file organisation, consistency) got in the way.
    Yeah I can understand this. I've had similar things at my work. I write texts for websites (SEO texts which rank highly in Google and inform the customers at the same time, also blogs and regular website texts (like "About us" pages and such)) and am also in charge of spelling/grammar checking of other people's texts. Multiple times it's happened that we got a new person who claims (s)he's very good at Dutch grammar and wants to spell/grammar check the texts that people have written. So my supervisor goes "great, welcome to the team, Hans (my name) is going to check your work to be sure, but that's just a formality, I'm sure you're great at it." But just knowing the Dutch grammar rules isn't enough, you also have to have a really precise eye to catch all the mistakes.

    So my supervisor built these people up and gave them confidence and then it turns out they aren't good enough at it. They didn't have the precision required and/or they weren't as good at Dutch grammar as they thought they were. And I had to tell them that, which I seriously didn't like.

    Now I have a new supervisor, and I told him about this. Thankfully he said he wasn't going to operate this way.

    side note: there's a great writer on our team that I get along with very well. But he's computer illiterate to a high degree. I've showed him how to do things multiple times, but now he's writing down the steps of the things I show him, because he doesn't want to ask every time. In that case I don't mind, and as I said, he's a great asset to our team. He's also one of the few other people on the team who actually can do grammar checks well.
    Last edited by Harvester; 12th Jul 2017 at 05:38.

  3. #28
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: Cologne
    @Nayru-chan00 : I know what it's like to be that guy in the family of course. But it can be warranted if your relatives have other skills and help you back. Continuously relying on others at the job is different.

    But what I really wanted to get at is this: If you want your daughter to become a programmer (and you should because it's one of the most intellectually fulfilling jobs there are, that also gets paid) then teach them how much fun it is to solve logical problems. Every techie I know wants women in this job, but at Girls Day I hear those old cliches repeated by 14 year old girls, how they don't want to program because that's difficult and numbers and logic are basically appalling. There's a straight line going from Princess Lilly Fee's dreamworld to thinking you can live off (and should be valued for) your overwhelming emotions. Keep them for god's sake away from that crap unless you want them to become someone else's breeding chamber.

    And yeah, advice from a childless guy of course. Don't listen to me, what do I know.

  4. #29
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Hrm. So what you're saying is, if someone isn't good at logic and numbers or straight out doesn't like 'em, they should still do it because programming pays well? I don't see how that path is any less cynical than someone who chooses to feel that gifting the world their precious viewpoint is a worthy revenue stream.

  5. #30
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: Cologne
    Whether you are good at some skill and like it is at least partly due to your upbringing. Women are underrepresented in programming jobs. Since I don't believe they have less natural ability for it, it follows that they are brought up to dislike it and hence don't get good at it.

  6. #31
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2002
    Location: Girl with the Patreon Tattoo
    Moving to Stockholm tomorrow. Dang.

  7. #32
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: Cologne
    Sounds cool. What are you up to up there?

  8. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Kolya View Post
    @Nayru-chan00 : I know what it's like to be that guy in the family of course. But it can be warranted if your relatives have other skills and help you back. Continuously relying on others at the job is different.

    But what I really wanted to get at is this: If you want your daughter to become a programmer (and you should because it's one of the most intellectually fulfilling jobs there are, that also gets paid) then teach them how much fun it is to solve logical problems. Every techie I know wants women in this job, but at Girls Day I hear those old cliches repeated by 14 year old girls, how they don't want to program because that's difficult and numbers and logic are basically appalling. There's a straight line going from Princess Lilly Fee's dreamworld to thinking you can live off (and should be valued for) your overwhelming emotions. Keep them for god's sake away from that crap unless you want them to become someone else's breeding chamber.

    And yeah, advice from a childless guy of course. Don't listen to me, what do I know.
    That's an interesting perspective, thanks!

    I think one of the reasons why women are under-represented in programming jobs and IT in general (combined with your reason, Kolya) is because they don't want to be harassed on a daily basis. Sadly, it happens a lot of times, but less and less each day.

  9. #34
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Qantas
    Quote Originally Posted by Kolya View Post
    Ever since she has required constant hand holding. There's a number of reasons for her eventual failure but the main points are that A) She is too old to learn and remember complex stuff.
    There is no such thing as too old to learn and remember complex stuff. I have worked with engineers and scientists as young as 20 and as old as 83. Some of the oldest people I've worked with are also some of the most intellectually curious and are always learning and looking for something to challenge themselves. I could make this a long post by sharing a bunch of anecdotal stories, but the short version is that I don't see much of a correlation between age and ability to learn, at least up to the point where people start losing some of their mental faculties. Instead, what I see is some correlation between age and the desire to learn, but I think that correlation mainly exists among people who are intellectually lazy to begin with.

    B) Being a coder to her is a male thing that she basically rejects. So she tried to become a designer, but her lack of basic computer skills (file organisation, consistency) got in the way.
    Well, then she is naive. I've encountered a lot of people like that who think programming is beneath them and think they can work in software at a higher level without understanding how the software really works. That never works. Some of them find their calling in project management or functional management, some move into quality, configuration management, process engineering, tech writing, or another ancillary engineering discipline. And unfortunately, there are always a few who are somehow able to sell themselves to management as architects, and produce useless models or go around evangelizing tools or methodologies that help nobody.

  10. #35
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Quote Originally Posted by Kolya View Post
    Whether you are good at some skill and like it is at least partly due to your upbringing. Women are underrepresented in programming jobs. Since I don't believe they have less natural ability for it, it follows that they are brought up to dislike it and hence don't get good at it.
    This may be true, but only to a degree. It depends on the culture of the place you're brought up in. I do a massive amount of interviews where I need to assess people's communication skills on a regular basis, and it's startling how many of them tell me that they studied computers and IT engineering because their parents asked them to, but aren't interested in careers within the domain because they're bad at programming. I'm not saying it's only the girls who say it, but there's a decent % either way.

    Anyhow, it always comes across as a cop-out. At some point, the individual is responsible for their own choices regardless of what the parents have to say.

  11. #36
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: Cologne
    On my way to work there's a stretch of blackberry bushes. Today they were ready to be eaten. I pushed down the protruding branches with my skateboard and felt like a kid stealing from the neighbor's garden. They are on public property, but living in the city it's exceedingly rare to find stuff you want to eat just growing somewhere.
    I heard they plan on planting fruit trees in the city now. Why has no one thought of this before??

  12. #37
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Kolya View Post
    I heard they plan on planting fruit trees in the city now. Why has no one thought of this before??
    Mostly pest management, actually. But think about this: A lot of cities went for a big tree planting push when it turned out that they're pretty good at sopping up pollutants in the ground and air. City neighborhood gardens have been known to test rather high for various heavy metals.

  13. #38
    Administrator
    Registered: Oct 2000
    Location: Athens of the North
    That would probably just turn the blackberries a shade of Deep Purple

  14. #39
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2014
    Quote Originally Posted by Kolya View Post
    Yeah, her current weight loss is due to thyroid suppressing medicine. She was already very weak because of lack of potassium and then stopped eating for 3 days straight. Last night I filled a syringe with cat milk and shot that down her throat. Apparently that reminded her that eating isn't all that bad and she had some light snacks. Finally.

    I should mention http://felinecrf.info here, which helped me diagnose her correctly. The vet's tip had been a rare disease that she was tested negatively for.
    We had a cat who also suffered from this thyroid issue. We were able to get medication from the vet that reversed the problem - in fact we had to start monitoring her food intake because after a year she was getting quite fat! If you haven't explored the medication option, it was relatively inexpensive and easy to administer. We hid the pills in treats (I think Pill Pocket was the brand) and it worked like a charm.

  15. #40
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Qantas
    OT: Blackberry bushes are the bane of my existence. They are the worst invasive species around here and every time I mow the lawn I have to spend 15 minutes cutting down new stalks and trying to find root crowns to tear out. The stuff grows and spreads so fast.

  16. #41
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: Cologne
    @TannisRoot: I'm giving my cat a liquid medicine twice a day. As Al_B mentioned surgery is also an option, but it carries a risk of cutting out too much thyroid tissue and getting the opposite problem. But I'm considering it. There's also radioactive Iodine treatment, which I'm not sure yet if any vet nearby can provide.
    In any case it will take a while before she gets back to her normal weight of uh 5,5kg. Right now she's very skinny. But she started eating regularly again and beginning to look better. I think she spent another of her 9 lives.

    On a completely different note: I finished watching Archer's 8th season. And unlike the Miami Vice themed season 5 I had some unexpected problems getting into this film noir distraction. Mainly because it was less funny and much darker than anything before, without reflecting much on it. While Archer himself was more relatable this time around, many other characters fell short. Instead Barry came back yet again, which I always held to be the most boring nemesis.

  17. #42
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2004
    My condolences Harvester, and anyone else experiencing illness of family and pets.

    I'm going through bunch of medical tests now (racking up those bills) as I've been suffering from chronic fatigue for a few years now :|

  18. #43
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: Cologne
    Man, that must suck. 😕
    Let them check your potassium level. It's not limited to cats, to be fatigued from a low level.

  19. #44
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Damn, Harvester, sorry to hear about your wife. And sorry about your chronic fatigue, Koob.

    Some people here have genuine problems, but lets not let that get in the way of me complaining about my first world problems, shall we? I'm on week 2 of my 6 week summer vacation and I'm bored! I should've booked a trip or something. At least I've got plenty of time to get some shit done! So that's what I'm doing. Every day I get up at 8:15 and go for a morning jog. Then shower, breakfast, and after that I try to spend at least an hour getting something done in Unity. I'm also gonna remaster some of my old animations and put them on youtube, clear my Steam backlog, clean this place up, and bake something. I've also upgraded my apartment a bit, bought new lamps. And I've found a buyer for my old apartment so I'm in the middle of that whole process.

  20. #45
    Same here, henke. Although for me it's mostly clearing out my Steam and non-Steam backlog and trying to get some shit done in Dromed.

  21. #46
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    Henke, you still need to do that freaky 3D VR version of a Pac-Man ghost, don't you? That should while away a morning.

  22. #47
    Southquarter.com/fms
    Registered: Apr 2000
    Location: The Akkala Highlands
    I'm guessing this thread doesn't have to be all doom and gloom, some "status updates" should be positive and include personal success stories too. Or just fun stuff.

    Me, I've been working out like a madman, and whipping my diet into shape too. Trying to lose 30 pounds by fall.

  23. #48
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: Cologne
    My backpain didn't kill me today! And I washed the feet of a young ballerina (from cat puke). And then we danced to 99 Luftballons.

  24. #49
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Kolya View Post
    Man, that must suck. 😕
    Let them check your potassium level. It's not limited to cats, to be fatigued from a low level.
    I've been undergoing a series of tests and so far nothing is found so I'm stuck with the generic "chronic fatigue" label aka you feel like crap and we don't know why. I did have a low white blood cell count tho, but that just raises more questions than answers. Also low sodium, surprise given I am pretty generous with salt and definitely opposite of sweet tooth.

    Maybe it really is just in my head and my brain is borked...

  25. #50
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Motherboard fried on a 7-month-old $1500 laptop today. =(
    7 months is really too early for motherboards to be frying out.

    I believe this isn't under a special warranty, just the factory one which used to be 1 year back in the day so I must have thought companies still did that. But it seems it's only for 30 days. And I honestly thought I bought the 2-year warranty but it seems I bought that for something else & not this one because I can't find the receipt email for it (but can find all the other receipt emails).

    So I guess that means I'll have to bite the bullet for a $600+ motherboard + repair is probably another $200 + shipping... Blech.

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