TTLG|Thief|Bioshock|System Shock|Deus Ex|Mobile
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 85

Thread: I'm SO Old

  1. #26
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Qantas
    We all had phones, but when I was a kid we would just walk over to each other's houses and ring the doorbell anyway.

    But that was back when kids could walk around the neighborhood freely. That's one of the things I'm most nostalgic for.

  2. #27
    Zombified
    Registered: Sep 2004
    yeah, no way that's happening now with all the hobos, junkies and other types of people you wouldn't touch with a two meter pole all around - one of the very few things the Reds got right is that streets are supposed to be clean of trash, be it just regular litter or former human beings (the other two is being required to explain where all your money is coming from and ALL foods and drinks not being permitted in cinemas).

    pretty sure I'm happy to have them (Reds) gone (and wouldn't mind if they were actually banned completely), but those three bits.. yeah, I wouldn't mind to have them back. but that's like wanting to be 20 again, I suppose - just not happening.
    Last edited by voodoo47; 25th Aug 2017 at 04:10.

  3. #28
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: Cologne
    Say what you want about political regimes, but at least they keep the streets safe and clean.

  4. #29
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Qantas
    I was raised in a tract home in a middle class suburb. We had clean streets and no hobos or junkies, just the occasional neighbor with a scary dog. The only thing we really had to watch out for was cars, and poison ivy. The typical rule was that if you were younger than school age, you couldn't leave your own yard unless accompanied by an older sibling or a neighbor your parents trusted. I lived just over 1/2 mile from an elementary school and from the 1st grade on we just walked to school. From the time school ended until supper time, we had free reign. The neighborhood was full of kids so we had lots of fun and adventures.

    I followed in my parents footsteps and now I'm raising my kids in a tract home in a middle class suburb. We have clean streets and no hobos or junkies, and as far as I can tell, the only thing we really have to watch out for is cars. But nobody lets their kids roam the neighborhood until they're in their teens, and even the teens tend to stay inside.

    Kids around here have mountains of toys. I think my kids have more than they can play with, so I'm always on my wife's case to get rid of some if she wants to buy some more. But when we visit other people with young children their homes are just overflowing with toys. And most play is supervised. When I was a kid, we didn't have nearly so many toys, but we had freedom. We improvised toys and made up games and went on adventures in the woods and gullys. Every day there might be a different mix of kids getting together in a different spot coming up with a different activity. And we didn't have parents circling around trying to supervise and direct our play.

    That's what I'm nostalgic for and what I wish my kids could have.

  5. #30
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2005
    Location: Not Kansas
    Quote Originally Posted by heywood View Post
    I was raised in a tract home in a middle class suburb. We had clean streets and no hobos or junkies, just the occasional neighbor with a scary dog. The only thing we really had to watch out for was cars, and poison ivy. The typical rule was that if you were younger than school age, you couldn't leave your own yard unless accompanied by an older sibling or a neighbor your parents trusted. I lived just over 1/2 mile from an elementary school and from the 1st grade on we just walked to school. From the time school ended until supper time, we had free reign. The neighborhood was full of kids so we had lots of fun and adventures.
    Sounds like we grew up in the same neighborhood. Good times.

  6. #31
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    We had a game we called "herding cans". Whenever we were just out walking with a group of friends we would start kicking cans from roadside ditches along the street. The farther we walked the more cans there were and the harder it was to keep them all going the same direction. It made an awful racket and was more fun than you would imagine. It also cleaned up the neighborhood.

    I don't mean to make out like we were goody goody. Hardly. We also did things like waiting in the deep ditch where the streetlight cast a shadow to hide in and cars had to stop at a crossing. We would wait for the local sheriff to come along then throw a string of lit firecrackers on his hood and run in different directions only to meet back up at the cemetery. We also snuck up on him and scotched all his tires with bricks then cut doughnuts on our dirt bikes in front of him to get him to chase us and laughed when he couldn't move. Bad was always much more fun.

  7. #32
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Location: CT, USA
    I can remember...
    - there still being hobos along the RR tracks in my northern NJ suburban community, you could talk to them and they had amazing stories of their travels.
    - the second Stevenson/Eisenhower election (I was 6, Ike won both), first voting in '72 for McGovern whose hand I shook.
    - getting our own private phone line ~1955, before that we had a party line and you needed the operator to connect you.
    - Howdy Doody, Andy's Gang, Winky Dink, Tom Terrific, Rocky & Bullwinkle, Mickey Mouse Club, Ozzie & Harriet, Donna Reed, The Beaver, etc, etc.
    - White Castle burgers for a nickel, same for all candy bars, and NYC subway fare was 15 cents.
    - going to see the Yankees with Mantle, Maris, Yogi, Kubek, Skowren, McDougal, Whitey Ford, etc.
    - Acapulco gold (it was a light tan color) at $15/oz, you could barely close the baggie, regular grade was $10, lbs were $50-60.
    - blue cheer, blotter, orange sunshine, brown barrels, windowpane.........................
    - seeing the Grateful Dead at the Old Village Theater before it became the Fillmore East, couple yrs later seeing them and New Riders late shows that ended after dawn, also Big Brother w/Janis first NYC show down the street at the Anderson Theater (incredible!).
    - seeing the Grateful Dead the night they got busted on Bourbon Street, along with Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac (all guys), was the first successful rock concert in NOLA, other bands had tried but the cops ran them off, everyone came after that. I was attending college at Tulane, today I have the audio of that entire show on my hard drive.
    - having Red Buttons and acapella group The Impressions (as separate fares) in my NYC taxi back in the Harry Chapin days.
    - marching/getting tear-gassed in DC the week after Kent State when all the colleges closed early.

  8. #33
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN

  9. #34
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2005
    Location: swimming in pickled herring
    Quote Originally Posted by voodoo47 View Post
    I'm old enough to remember my mother covering my mouth with her hand because I was asking stupid questions in public and the secret police had their ears everywhere.
    Wow,just wow. So hard to imagine how much different our childhoods must have been.

  10. #35
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2005
    Location: swimming in pickled herring
    Growing up we also roamed our neighborhood at will, and most family's had "dinner bells". I still have ours, it's a huge cow-bell that you can hear for miles. No one had AC then, so in the summer we would sleep with all the windows and doors open, and even in the winter we never locked our doors. When we were bored with our neighborhood we would hop on a freight train to a place called Tri-County where there was a Mall. Malls back then were a bunch of separate stores grouped together, like a Mall now, but with outdoor walkways between them. Over time covered walkways popped up, and finally the giant sprawling horrors that are the modern Mall appeared. Also, those walkways (and everywhere else) were littered with can tabs. That's right you kids, drink cans had tabs that came off of the can! There was a cinema there that showed movies at midnight. They cleverly called that Midnite Movies, and you could smoke (anything) and bring in beer. There was a cop on duty always, but he would only get official if a fight broke out, and even then you had to really be an ass to get thrown out. I only remember one time when he actually went full policeman, and even then he let us off because he knew us, and knew we never really started any trouble. He called in a couple of other officers, and the other guys got hauled off by them. Oh, and those trains we would use to get around, they had conductors, and some of them carried guns! They hung out in the last car of all trains, and the story was that they would shoot you with shotguns loaded with salt. I never heard of anyone being shot by them, but I had seen them holding guns. They knew we were on the train, but they never seemed to care. I was born in 1965, so I was too young for the Vietnam and Korean wars and too old for the first Gulf War. My father had a small trucking company and we had one driver who was a really funny, and always joking around. He used to babysit me and my brothers when my parents would go out. I remember when he suddenly was not around anymore, he had been drafted into the Vietnam war. I remember when he came back a couple of years later, he didn't smile or laugh for years. Speaking of which, I'm so old I still have my Selective Service paperwork, when I was young, every male had to register for the draft. Speaking of war, while I was in primary school, we had drills in case of atomic war. We were trained to duck under our desks at school, 'cause of course that would save you from a nuclear bomb.

    edit:I also remember being taught about paragraphs and such, but I have clearly forgotten all those rules of grammar.
    Last edited by montag; 28th Aug 2017 at 23:45. Reason: public school

  11. #36
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    I'm lucky that I never had to fight, but a friend of mine was sent to Chernobyl and I knew a guy who was in Afghanistan. Soviet draft was not a joke.

  12. #37
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2003
    Location: not there again!
    Chalk one up for Team East of Iron Curtain.
    I remember getting a rotary phone sometime around '87 or so, and the first phone number our apartment had just 6 digits (and an extension if you wanted to call long distance), because there weren't that many phones in the country to warrant more until about a decade later. I remember the number to this day, 490 477.
    Ice cream cost around a nickel, then they jacked up the prices to something like a dime. I had weekly allowance equivalent to one quarter in today's currency.
    My dad used to send me out with a big jug to bring beer from a nearby pub when he had some friends visiting. I was maybe six or seven, and no eyebrows were raised ever.
    Our first car had been made ten years before I was born, and it only had waist belts on the front seats. It overheated regularly on every sunny summer day. This made for some interesting (and long) road trips.
    We used to leave our shoes in front of the doors of our apartment, and they wouldn't be stolen. Who'd steal a pair of crusty old shoes anyway?
    Kids like me spent afternoons after school roaming the neighborhood on our rusty BMX bikes. If you haven't jammed a bit of cardboard (later plastic) to rattle on the wires in the rear rim, you weren't cool. Bike helmets were a thing worn by professional bike racers.
    Milk was sold in plastic bags until maybe '94 or so. That was pretty much the only grocery item sold in plastic packaging. Most of the other stuff was wrapped in paper, or sold in glass or metal containers. Shops didn't sell plastic bags, and we carried a textile or string bag when we went shopping.
    I didn't understand why my parents wouldn't let me participate in an evening walk with homemade paper lamps in early November. I had no idea what the Glorious October Revolution was about, or even why the walk was organized in November. I just wanted to make my own light, but I was told "maybe on another occasion".
    For quite some time, I thought "communist" was an insult that meant something like dirty, sleazy, or insidious. I also understood that the word was not to be spoken outside family members.
    I haven't felt particularly old until earlier this year, when my mother commented on my beard (of all things) getting some grey hairs. I thought they might be just pale blonde
    I was born too late to explore the world, and too early to explore the galaxy, but perhaps at the right time to witness some tremendous changes around me. It's almost incomprehensible to me how much of mental distance there is in some regards between myself and "kids" who are just a decade younger.
    Also, if you've been born post 2000, you're a kindergartener to me.

  13. #38
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: Montreal, Canada
    I'm so old I remember the dialup era, when it took about 10 hours to download an 8 MB file from the Internet

  14. #39
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2000
    Location: Portreath Cornwall UK
    I'm so old I remember the first digital calculator some future geek bought to school and I was sat in front of a black and white tv when England won the football world cup. On the same tv watched Armstrong and Aldrin walk the moon. One of my chores was to pick up after the milk mans horse... I was free to roam the deepest darkest depths of Cornwall with little to no parental control. Coastal fishing trips for days at a time, hitch hiking "up country" and back... Happy days...

  15. #40
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere
    Lots of exploring smugglers caves I bet!

  16. #41
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    Looking at this picture makes me want to call up my dad, and remind him that he was a giant dork in the early 80's.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	LittleMe.jpg 
Views:	10 
Size:	144.5 KB 
ID:	2384

  17. #42
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2002
    Location: Landahn
    So were you.

  18. #43
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    No, I was pretty rad, strutting about in my red overalls like I owned the place.

  19. #44
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Your dad was pretty dorky to dress you in that, yeah.

  20. #45
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    A. It was probably mom who dressed me
    B. Don't diss my rad red overalls. I'd smack you in the mouth right now if I could.

  21. #46
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Is that your mom on the bottom right trying to get you to eat dinner? 'Look, Renzy-poo, airplane!'

  22. #47
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    It's some random freak kid I don't remember getting all up in my territory. Probably jealous of my rad red overalls.

    AND I LOVE AIRPLANE! ZOOM ZOOM YUM!

  23. #48
    LittleFlower
    Registered: Jul 2001
    Location: Netherlands
    Quote Originally Posted by Azaran View Post
    I'm so old I remember the dialup era, when it took about 10 hours to download an 8 MB file from the Internet
    I remember the Internet was still in black&white.


    I remember we had a 128 Kbps connection.

    And before you start yelling that you had a 33 Kbps connection at home.... When I said "we had a 128 Kbps connection", I mean we: the whole country. Yep, all of the Netherlands was connected from CWI to UUnet in Fairfax via a 128 Kbps link. When that link went down we (the whole country) would be rerouted via Sweden or Spain. Which both had a 64 Kbps connection to the Internet. I remember doing a "host -l nl." and seeing that we had about a dozen sites in NL that were really connected to the net. (Another dozen or so only had MX records, they would get their mail via UUCP, not via a direct IP connection).

  24. #49
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2003
    Location: Location, Location
    Quote Originally Posted by Renzatic View Post
    Looking at this picture makes me want to call up my dad, and remind him that he was a giant dork in the early 80's.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	LittleMe.jpg 
Views:	10 
Size:	144.5 KB 
ID:	2384
    You wouldn't happen to be named Dennis?

  25. #50
    Moderator
    Registered: Apr 2003
    Location: Wales
    Quote Originally Posted by Medlar View Post
    I was sat in front of a black and white tv when England won the football world cup. On the same tv watched Armstrong and Aldrin walk the moon.
    Me too!
    I didn't really know football but I watched and felt the excitement and remember dancing round the room when we won. Walking on the moon was the most amazing thing I had ever seen or, even now, have ever seen. I've never forgotten it - watching now still sends shivers. I would be more than bitterly disappointed if it ever turned out to be the hoax that some people say it is.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •