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Thread: I'm SO Old

  1. #51
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    Quote Originally Posted by nickie View Post
    I would be more than bitterly disappointed if it ever turned out to be the hoax that some people say it is.
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  2. #52
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2003
    Location: Location, Location
    If the USA had faked the moon landing, the Soviets would've cried foul immediately. They had the ability to track the Apollo module on its way to and from the moon.

  3. #53
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    The only logical answer is that the Soviets were in cahoots with us to stage the landing.

  4. #54
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    Don't forget the Australians. They received the first images with the Parkes radio telescope which had to be pointed directly at the moon landing site with severe accuracy as if they were actually on the moon. The bastards.

  5. #55
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    Speaking of idiots who believe stupid shit, they were just random nutbags who hung out on street corners talking loudly back then. Now they have flat earth sites to convince other super Neo science illiterates with illogical arguments and graphics a cave dweller can point at and go oooog oooog!

  6. #56
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    I'm convinced that the whole flat earther thing started out as a bunch of trolls trying to get a rise out of people, and it ended up getting out of hand.

  7. #57
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    So, just like the Trump presidency? How long until dihydrogen monoxide paranoia has unironic supporters? (Houston doesn't count.)

  8. #58
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    We already have people talking about Obama's poor response to hurricane Katrina during his presidency, so...maybe sometime tomorrow?
    Last edited by Renzatic; 1st Sep 2017 at 14:00.

  9. #59
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Qantas
    Quote Originally Posted by Tocky View Post
    Don't forget the Australians. They received the first images with the Parkes radio telescope which had to be pointed directly at the moon landing site with severe accuracy as if they were actually on the moon. The bastards.
    There's a nice little feel good comedy film about that called The Dish starring Sam Neill and Patrick Warburton.


  10. #60
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: Cologne
    I've seen it. Nice film. Especially Sam Neill.

  11. #61
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    I'll have to see it sometime. I agree with nickie that it was the most amazing thing in my lifetime that man has yet done. But I have no doubt that it was done. None. I understand radio telemetry and the Van Allen belts and Newtons third law and all the things the nutbag moon hoaxers do not. One day we may devolve into blithering idiocracy and hoaxers and flatards become the norm but that LEM pad and that plaque and even that faded crumpled flag will remain for an age of enlightenment when we may yet go again and discover the footprints we left when we were there the first time.

  12. #62
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2003
    Location: Cambridgeshire UK
    Thinking back, I have just realised that one of the big changes in my lifetime was the arrival of the first detergent (Teepol) in the mid 1940s. The first detergent washing powder (Tide) came on the market a few years later.

    Life became much easier for the housewife (men didn't do housework). It really was a life-changer.

  13. #63
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Wow that kind of puts things in perspective.

    I don't doubt it though. The brief time I lived in Myanmar and I had to wash laundry from a bucket, I came to appreciate how grueling that kind of work was. (And during rainy season, sheesh, it could hang for 5 days and still not be entirely dry, but you were going to wear it out into the rain anyway....) And that was with detergent made for doing laundry from a bucket. If we didn't have the detergent, goodness, I can't even imagine...

    I took "showers" from a bucket too... But that wasn't so bad once I learned I could use the kettle to heat the water, and mix a little into each bucket. I later learned that was "life in a developing country" 101 stuff that everybody around me knew, but I guess that's part of the process/charm of learning to live in a new culture.

    (They had "heating sticks" you could stick into the cold water basin to warm it up, but call my crazy, I was highly suspicious of putting a metal rod connected to I-don't-know-how-many-but-a-lot-of volts of electricity into a pool of water with my bare hands while standing on a wet floor. Egads!)

  14. #64
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Location: CT, USA
    I missed being born in the 1940s by a couple weeks. I remember our 'semi-automatic' washing machine had a big open basin with an agitator and a large wringer mounted on the top, still a heck of a lot of work. We got a dryer later on, but for years everything got hung outside (weather/season permitting) or in the basement. Counting several hours of ironing (synthetics were just beginning so everything had wrinkles) my mother spent a lot of her work week doing laundry.

    I happened to be in Taiwan in '69 when we landed on the moon, spent the summer since my father was working over there. I missed the depth of coverage back in the US, but it was followed very closely there with every tv tuned to it, also many strangers came up to shake your hand just for being an American, it was really quite moving. Just being over there was a great experience, it was still very much like traditional China (rickshaws, open sewers, bound feet, etc) and seemed as much a visit to a different time as place.

    Those 'heating sticks' remind me of the showers when living in Guatemala in 2013. With no central hot water, many shower heads were 'point of use' with electrical wires attached, often giving you small but noticeable shocks when adjusting the metal H/C handles. Out on the roads you passed indigenous women dressed in beautiful woven outfits, with large bundles of laundry or firewood balanced on their heads, maybe a kid strapped to their backs, while using their free hands to text on their phones!

  15. #65
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    You're all making me feel bad over here. You ask me about the trials and tribulations of my childhood, and all I'd have in response would be a "we only had three channels while I was growing up, and I sometimes had to walk outside to shake the antenna if they came in a little snowy." While relatively more primitive, my parents still had dishwashers, washing machines, driers, vacuum cleaners, and all the other niceties we all take for granted these days.

    But you people? You're all like "when I was your age, we didn't have busses to take us to school. We had a donkey and a cart, and sometimes the donkey would die, and we'd have to walk the 30+ miles to the one room shack that was our elementary school to take our classes, which we DAMN WELL BETTER APPRECIATED THAN YOUR LOT! Oh, and the trip was uphill both ways. And during a war."

  16. #66
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: Cologne
    One of the main things I remember from childhood is the feeling of being helpless at the hands of adults that I would classify from misguided to imbecilic. Teachers, politicians, parents of friends and also the random strangers on the street who felt they had to give me some "education". Being a kid was shit. The lack of basic respect that comes with it sucks. Not being able to make my own decisions sucked. Having to get up at 6:30 in the winter to sit in school at 8 - totally comatose - was and is a shit idea for anyone involved.
    I probably didn't have a worse childhood than most here (at least not worse than voodoo's). I drove my bike through the Illuminati parks of Gotha for hours and days. I played Xenon II in hotseat and smoked on the toilet. But I'm so glad I'm "so old" now that I can shape my life mostly as I see fit. Childhood is overrated by adults. Youth is pretty interesting but filled with a different set of anxieties. Being grown up is where it's at.

    Just saying this to any kid who reads this. Yes, you're at a shitty time of your life, you're not mistaken. The adults who tell you to enjoy it are. It may get better. Or not. Take a gamble? Well, what choice do you have.

  17. #67
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Kolya View Post
    One of the main things I remember from childhood is the feeling of being helpless at the hands of adults that I would classify from misguided to imbecilic.
    Oh, yeah, very much this. Don't get me wrong, my last "boss" was a misguided imbecile too, but now I don't work there anymore. Not much you can do about it as a child.

  18. #68
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    For me, my childhood and teenage years were a bipolar rollercoaster of stupendous highs and crushing lows. Everything was a big deal, every experience the greatest thing ever, or the worst thing that could possibly happen, and I responded to each accordingly. Life was all one great big hormone addled mystery, where everyone experienced everything for the first time, and no one knew how to deal with anything in a rational, responsible manner.

    The greatest boon of adulthood is that you have a much broader perspective on everything, and learn how to take it all, the highs, the lows, and everything in between in rather nonchalant strides.

    Though that also serves as the greatest downside of adulthood. For good and ill, wisdom tends to blunt some of life's sharper stinging edges.

  19. #69
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    Quote Originally Posted by Renzatic View Post
    You're all making me feel bad over here. You ask me about the trials and tribulations of my childhood, and all I'd have in response would be a "we only had three channels while I was growing up, and I sometimes had to walk outside to shake the antenna if they came in a little snowy." While relatively more primitive, my parents still had dishwashers, washing machines, driers, vacuum cleaners, and all the other niceties we all take for granted these days.
    Man I remember trying to get channel 13 out of Memphis when Sivad came on for the Fantastic Features horror show. Is it better yet? *squeek squeek* Not yet... no wait... hold it right there! But overall I had a great childhood. Sure I was beat until blood blisters formed scabs on my ass because I rolled my eyes at the teacher when she asked me to come to the board and explain a math problem that only I got but I was terrified of public speaking and it was like a horse rolling it's eyes at a snake and to this day I have a second of panic when faced with any math problem but overall that was the only bad thing to happen to me. I fucking loved the rest of it. Scouting and hunting and fishing with Dad and Trick or Treat and spending nights over with friends and girls, always girls, to hold hands and kiss and everything eager and new. One day I want to write a book on it all exactly the way it happened because it was just so goddamn great and it lives in my memory full and vivid and I don't know how I lucked out the way I did. I feel I grew up in the perfect age with a magic charm.

    I'm sorry for some of you but it's not a rewrite of history for some of us. It really WAS fucking great.

    Those wringer washing machines? My cousins terrified me with stories of "this one guy who got his hand caught" so that I kept my hands well back from it when I helped Grandma who had one. Those things did break buttons after all.

  20. #70
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Bremerton Washington
    I remember MS-DOS and what it took to get there from 1950!

  21. #71
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    I can't exactly complain either, Tocky. I mean sure, I had to deal with the occasional idiot adult lording over me, but it's not like I listened to anyone anyway while I was growing up.

    If I have any one thing to complain about, it'd be that my first 11 years were pretty lonely ones, since I lived out in the middle of nowhere, with no kids my age around me. I had my friends from school, but I only got to see them then. I wasn't allowed to spend the night at anyone's houses until I was 10. Besides those occasions when I'd go see family, my afternoons and weekends were just me out in the fields and woods all by myself.

  22. #72
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    I don't think childhood can be summarised to an episode of life where thing were great/not great in any way that doesn't reduce its essence down to nostalgia or resentment. My childhood had all of the magical things I won't forget -- the sounds and smells of the beach at sunset with gigantic Chinese fishing nets like sails unfurled against the sky, the discoveries I happened upon whilst cycling down to the edge of the road past our neighbourhood and pushing on into the unknown without caring if I could remember the way back (I didn't), but also all of the things that were dark and awful and never left. It's a heady broth, and you can't just boil it down to a few words.

  23. #73
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Quote Originally Posted by demagogue View Post
    I took "showers" from a bucket too... But that wasn't so bad once I learned I could use the kettle to heat the water, and mix a little into each bucket. I later learned that was "life in a developing country" 101 stuff that everybody around me knew, but I guess that's part of the process/charm of learning to live in a new culture.

    (They had "heating sticks" you could stick into the cold water basin to warm it up, but call my crazy, I was highly suspicious of putting a metal rod connected to I-don't-know-how-many-but-a-lot-of volts of electricity into a pool of water with my bare hands while standing on a wet floor. Egads!)
    It's funny reading this, because it's pretty much a way of life for people here, even those with access to showerheads. Tends to use less water, you see. Yes, heating rods aren't generally safe as they're essentially a shielded heating element in water without an automatic shut-off mechanism; there's stories of people falling on them and dying as recently as 2014 this year, but people here use 'em anyway because they're cheaper than mounting a heater ('geyser', in our oldspeak post-independence parlance) on the bathroom wall.
    Last edited by Sulphur; 5th Sep 2017 at 04:06.

  24. #74
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2005
    Location: swimming in pickled herring
    So many good stories in this thread, just like me to start a thread and then not contribute to it. I am fascinated by the stories from those of you who were born before me (1965), and especially voodoo47's remembrances. The good news for all you youngsters is, if we are all lucky, you will be able to recount stories about how scary it was to live in a world where nuclear war was something people had to actually worry about! But to get back on track, I remember DOS and 5.25" floppys. I remember when I had my last cutting-edge PC. It was a 386 DX-40 with a Math Co-processor, 16 MBs(!)of ram and a 4MB video card, and 2 huge 40MB HDDs with DiskDoubler on both. I bought all the components from "Computer Shopper" and that rag was as thick as a phone book.(I'm so old I remember phone books) I could make beautiful models of our solar system with 3-D Studio, and they looked almost better than models of our solar system made with crayons. I'm so old my first degree was in Industrial Design, from the University of Cincinnati's college of D.A.A. (Design, Art and Architecture), for several decades now that college has been known as D.A.A.P. (the P is for Planning, as in City Planning, which is apparently a thing now) I'm so old, when I attended that school, they had no computer courses, we did everything by hand, with archaic tools like Rapidagraphs, T-squares, Triangles and French Curves. If you fucked up, you started over, there was no Ctrl+Z.

  25. #75
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2003
    Location: Cambridgeshire UK
    I'm resurrecting this thread because of recent conversations with people of my son's generation. I'd noticed that they are very much more risk averse than people of my age, perhaps because we'd spent many years half expecting to be bombed (WW2) or nuked (cold war).

    When I mentioned the number of aircraft accidents accepted as normal when I started flying with the RAF, they didn't believe me. When shown the stats, they thought my colleagues and I were raving mad to choose RAF aircrew as a career. (We all thought it probably wouldn't happen to us and the pay was good.)

    Here are the RAF aircraft losses the year I started:

    http://www.ukserials.com/losses-1956.htm

    I make that 378, ie more than one per day.

    The figures reduced significantly when National Service stopped (164 in 1959). Coincidence?

    I'll be interested to hear what you younger ones think.

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