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Thread: What is your favorite tree and why is it your favorite tree?

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2017
    Location: Vancouver Island - BC

    What is your favorite tree and why is it your favorite tree?

    For 3 good reasons and also one bad reason the Red alder is my favorite tree. The Red alder is one of the few trees that is capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen and a bonus benefit of them doing that is the process greatly improves the soil around the tree (if you google - Red alders + root nodules you might find it very interesting). The Red alder is also good for forestry - its fast growing so they can get 2 or 3 harvest in the same time that it would take to grow a fir tree so it keeps the forestry related jobs going. Red alders are also one of the best woods for smoking salmon - gives the salmon a nice taste. The possible bad reason for me liking Red alders is - they give off the exact same infrared signature as a cannabis plant so if you hide your pot plants around Red alders it will fool the cops in helicopters looking for plants with an infrared camera. Cheers!
    Last edited by Nanoose; 7th Nov 2017 at 11:09.

  2. #2
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: Cologne
    I think you've been smoking too much salmon or something. But okay, my favourite tree wouldn't be a species but certain individual trees. As long as they are HUGE, have smooth bark, big chunky roots extending everywhere and a high and majestic crown - I'm in awe and will sit under it, hug it (especially if my arms can't reach around), try to feel it's might and look at it for elongates times. If it's a beech or gingko or whatever I don't care much, but definitely deciduous trees. Conifers can fuck right off.

  3. #3
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2004
    I like kd-trees myself, simple but still very powerful.

  4. #4
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Birches, we had a bunch of them in our yard. Reminds me of home. There's not much money in them though. Too twisted to make good lumber. As a recent inheritor of forestlands I'm starting to grow more fond of pines, for the good price they fetch, signifying my turn away from childhood sentimentality and into becoming a coldhearted capitalist.
    Last edited by henke; 7th Nov 2017 at 04:59.

  5. #5
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Mangroves, cause they're friggin' cool, that's why. Failing that, junipers for their interesting smell.

  6. #6
    Administrator
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: above the clouds
    Japanese maples for variety of colour. Also henke owns a forest?

  7. #7
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: the Sheeple Pen
    Or he could be talking about his Spintires experiences.

    The birch is my favourite too. It reminds me of summer and of the place where I grew up. Its leaves smell good and it looks pretty. It's also really good firewood.
    Even though I'm slightly allergic to its pollen, I still love ya, birch!

  8. #8
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Quote Originally Posted by scumble View Post
    Also henke owns a forest?
    *tucks thumbs behind suspenders* Ayup!

    Co-own it with my sister actually. Lots of people here (in rural areas, at least) own a slice of forestland, passed down through generations. If you take good care of it you can make a buck now and then!

  9. #9
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2002
    Location: Landahn
    I like the coconut tree. Big nuts.

  10. #10
    Administrator
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: above the clouds
    Quote Originally Posted by henke View Post
    *tucks thumbs behind suspenders* Ayup!

    Co-own it with my sister actually. Lots of people here (in rural areas, at least) own a slice of forestland, passed down through generations. If you take good care of it you can make a buck now and then!
    You mean it could get made into IKEA furniture? Well maybe something more interesting...

  11. #11
    I have many fond memories of trees from growing up, like that one elm tree (which is now long gone (in the name of progress)) that my father once took me to and taught me about its uses; that grove of maple trees, outside my grandparents' Summer house, that I used to climb to its very top afterwhich I made a whistle out of one of its leaves, larger than my hand, until everyone thought I was a bird (its seeds (together with the whole capsule) also provided some good fun among us kids for its ability to spin like a helicopter when dropped or its use as an extra nose); the oak tree, because it was great for climbing; the juniper tree (or is it a bush?), because butter knives made out of its wood were the best butter knives; the birch for its bark, because firestarter; the beech, even a whole land of them, because stupid crush; and so on... Not much of that is left now, though, so I'll simply say any tree that is still standing, forming a forest or woodland for me to walk in.

  12. #12
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2003
    Location: not there again!
    #1 is European mountain beech, the kind that's been growing for over a hundred years, stands over 30 meters tall and has that silvery-grey bark with tones of pink in it that reminds me of the mallorn trees from LOTR.
    #2 is probably common oak that's been planted some 300 to 500 years ago to reinforce lake dams. Not too tall but huge in volume.
    #3 is European yew, again, centuries old, knotty and sort of showing its age.

  13. #13
    Mistaken for a man
    Registered: Jun 2000
    Location: Helsinki, Finland
    I like all trees, but if I must name one species, it's the rowan. Delicate yet strong with sweet-scented blossoms and bright red berries, it's just beautiful In the old days Finns considered it sacred, it was especially women's tree and the symbol of the goddess Rauni.

  14. #14
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    My favorite tree is the mighty oak, for its gnarly grace, and extra savoir faire.

    Oh, and it's kinda rad that we all know someone who owns a forest.

  15. #15
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    The red oak. It makes a wonderful fire and it's wood is not only easily split but the smoke makes bacon delightful. That isn't the reason I like it though. All through my childhood I lay under a huge red oak at the end of the drive waiting for my dad to come in from work. I created complex war games with the man shaped leaves while I waited. The battles were epic. When he drove in I ran to him and he tossed me high in the air and hugged me and no matter how my day had gone it was all alright with the world then.

    I own a hundred acre wood. No Pooh though.

  16. #16
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    When I was a kid, I had the Climbing Tree, which I believe was an old oak, and the Bush Hut, which was a giant thick bramble of random plants covered in kudzu I carved tunnels and rooms into with hedge clippers. Mix all that with a Lazer Tag guns (which were 15 different types of damn awesome), and much fun was had for years on end.

    And yeah, a hundred acre wood is nice and all, but it's not a forest. Henke owns a forest. I bet he LARPs Skyrim in it.

  17. #17
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    When I was a young teen we would climb the trees around a pond near my house and bend the tops till we could reach the next tree top to cross around the pond using only the tops. We called it tippy topping for some stupid reason. We did it till one of my friends broke the top out of a sweet gum which mostly lined the bank. He fell thirty feet or better breaking limbs on the way down. He landed on his shoulders and the back of his head. No information would stick in his head for about ten minutes after. He kept asking what had happened. I told him twenty times. Being idiots we didn't insist he see a doctor. Not that he would go. He didn't die. Other than being an asshole he is alright to this day.

  18. #18
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Qantas
    For me it's probably the quaking aspen. I like the slender straight trunks covered with white, paper-like bark with black spots, and the leaves turn bright shades of yellow and red in the autumn making a pretty contrast with the trunks. I also like the look and sound of the leaves "quaking" (rustling) in a gentle breeze. The flowers are kind of interesting too.

    I'm not a fan of oaks. My home is surrounded by tall oaks. Their ugly catkins make a mess of everything in the spring, their canopies block the sunlight during the summer, they drop yards of acorns for me to pick up in the autumn, and they often wait until after the snow comes to drop their leaves.

  19. #19
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2011
    Location: Ferrol - Spain
    Castanea sativa and Quercus robur but Eucalyptus globulus are taking over (you get more money and grow up rapidly) but are ugly as fuck.

    https://www.google.com/maps/@43.4361...7i13312!8i6656

  20. #20
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Qantas
    Unfortunately, the North American species of chestnut (Castanea dentata) is all but gone due to the introduction of a fungus from Asia a century ago. These trees used to be widely used in landscaping, but I haven't held a burry chestnut fruit in my hand since I was a young kid. I am reminded of them every December when hearing "The Christmas Song".

    Another great decorative tree under threat is the Elm, which used to line so many city streets.

  21. #21
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    ...just how old are you, Heywood?

  22. #22
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Qantas
    45

  23. #23
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    I wasn't being serious. :P

    The way you worded the above, it made it sound like you were reminiscence about a tree that died a full century ago. Yeah, I know. Lame joke. Get my coat. Blah blah. Ain't my fault. It's early.

  24. #24
    New Member
    Registered: Oct 2017
    That would have to be the birch... In fact it also happens to be my sons name, “Birk” in danish

  25. #25
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Qantas
    Renz - I only had a moment to reply before running to a meeting. The longer explanation is that I was a pretty outdoorsy kid. My Dad was too, and he knew his trees. He made sure we checked out out a wild chestnut when we had the rare opportunity to see one. Also, my younger brother majored in forestry, so whenever I see him and we go for a walk, he points stuff out.

    This thread is making me want to clear some of my oaks to make space for planting some different trees. I hate to cut down a perfectly good tree though unless it's threatening my house.

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