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Thread: What is your favorite tree and why is it your favorite tree?

  1. #26
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    I recall the taste of chestnuts. Nothing else tastes anywhere near the same. To lose something unique is such a shame.

  2. #27
    Talking of chestnuts, I remember I had this recipe years ago for a cake containing chestnut cream, and went through a lot of effort finding it, searching everywhere, but no one had it. Then finally I found it -- and I want to say in the store on the corner where I lived, but that's not true; I don't remember where I found it. Anyway, I finally found this damn cream and it tasted a little weird, but, fuck it, it was too late to change recipes, so I made the cake anyway and hoped the cream would somehow transform into something delicious when combined with the other ingredients, but it didn't; the cake was in fact inedible -- and that, ladies and gentlemen, is unfortunately not how I met my soul mate and got my first job as a pastry chef.
    Last edited by qolelis; 12th Nov 2017 at 20:49.

  3. #28
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2011
    Location: Ferrol - Spain
    Galicia (my region) or Asturias in northwestern Spain canīt be understood without chestnuts. Itīs part of our cultural background.
    Thanks, Roma.

    https://www.google.com/maps/@42.8882...7i13312!8i6656

  4. #29
    El Shagmeister
    Registered: Jul 2000
    Location: Under your fingernails.

  5. #30
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Tacoma, Washington
    Madrona is pretty cool, and super unique, it has paper-thin bark and is smooth to the touch. My grandparents had a beach house with a very climbable Madrona tree and I enjoyed hanging out up there.

  6. #31
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    We call them Arbutus in Canada and yes they are quite amazing.



    Because they shed their bark yearly, the whole tree changes from pale green to vivid flame. The local species is Arbutus menziesii. It has a perfectly circular cross section on the smaller limbs. While they do well in cultivated situations, in the wild they are found in the most precarious locations. They seem to prefer cracks in granite, dusted with a few cups of sandy soil and leaning out over the ocean.
    Last edited by Nicker; 14th Nov 2017 at 16:22.

  7. #32
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: 1, Rotation: 0
    I've always had a weakness for trees. When I was a kid, I made my parents plant as many different trees in the garden as possible, but as time went by some of them had to be chopped down just to make room for the rest of them to grow - and also because my parents wanted some sunlight on the terrace

    I don't really have a favourite tree, but I like threm lithe and slender, especially if they have nice autumn colours, like birches and aspen. A forest of straight, sleek gray beeches also has a sort of somber dignity, like a cathedral.

  8. #33
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2017
    Location: Vancouver Island - BC
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicker View Post
    We call them Arbutus in Canada and yes they are quite amazing.



    Because they shed their bark yearly, the whole tree changes from pale green to vivid flame. The local species is Arbutus menziesii. It has a perfectly circular cross section on the smaller limbs. While they do well in cultivated situations, in the wild they are found in the most precarious locations. They seem to prefer cracks in granite, dusted with a few cups of sandy soil and leaning out over the ocean.
    Ya there a way cool looking tree - they don't grow in many other parts of the World so I feel privileged to have them in my area. But they might be dying out because of a parasite and scientist can't figure out how to control it. They did take gene slices (in case they all die out) so in the future they might be able to bring them back. Cheers!

  9. #34
    What good is a tree unless it makes things I can eat?

  10. #35
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    Well Tony, I suggest you read "The Giving Tree" by Shel Silverstein.

    Also-

    Quote Originally Posted by MrDuck View Post
    Dang Ducky that is good. Who wrote it? It almost sounds familiar.

  11. #36
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Tocky View Post
    Dang Ducky that is good. Who wrote it? It almost sounds familiar.
    William Blake: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poe.../a-poison-tree

  12. #37
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: Montreal, Canada
    Russian olive is an interesting, little known one, and has a sweet fruit too

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