TTLG|Thief|Bioshock|System Shock|Deus Ex|Mobile
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 31

Thread: Alcoholic beverages and the imbibing thereof

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered: May 2004

    Alcoholic beverages and the imbibing thereof

    I like alcohol a lot, though I haven't had much chance to drink the last couple of years (it's too damn expensive and time-consuming for a full-time student). I used to drink a lot when I was younger, but over the years I've become a more casual drinker with more discerning tastes -- the kind of alcoholic whose liquor cabinet stays full rather than empty.

    I don't really have a preference, I like to try out different drinks, but I mostly drink things like beer, wine, port, sherry and some not too fancy cocktails like Cuba Libre or gin and tonic. Something that lasts a while with a good book. For example, Czech beer like Staropramen, Cockburn’s port, gins like Bombay Sapphire (IMO just the right balance of price and quality). I also like whiskey, but the good ones are too expensive for me, unfortunately. Maybe when I'll get rich one day.

    Today I'm going to open a bottle of Gewürtztraminer, a German wine. I think it's probably the best German wine I've tasted so far. I like dry wines in general, but IMO this sort has just the right balance of not being too dry and having more flavour and sweetness than the usual white wines.

    So, what are your alcoholic preferences today and in general, ladies and gentlemen who like drinks of the alcoholic persuasion?

  2. #2
    Southquarter.com/fms
    Registered: Apr 2000
    Location: The Akkala Highlands
    As of about a year ago, I primarily crave only one alcoholic drink - a really good IPA. I usually pick up something good that's brewed locally.

  3. #3
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    Give me a nice bourbon and coke any day.

  4. #4
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2003
    Location: Cambridgeshire UK
    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    ..... gins like Bombay Sapphire (IMO just the right balance of price and quality). I also like whiskey, but the good ones are too expensive for me, unfortunately.
    I have very similar tastes in gin and whisky. However, there is little difference in price here between Bombay Sapphire and the more common single malt whiskies. Mark you, the top price gins are less than £2000 but the sky is the limit for old malt whisky.

    I was given a bottle of The Glenlivet Nadurra for Christmas. It tastes lovely, but as it's 60% it blows your head off at the same time! It costs about twice as much as Bombay Sapphire so I wouldn't buy it for myself.

  5. #5
    Moderator
    Registered: Apr 2003
    Location: Wales
    Ooh, Freddy, could I come and visit. I've got a bit of Bombay Sapphire in the cupboard I could bring with me.

  6. #6
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Qantas
    I like a good single malt. I used to be into Islays, but my current favorites are from The Balvenie. I usually get a bottle for Christmas, or occasionally for get togethers with old friends. It's not cheap around here and doesn't last long, so I only splurge on whiskey for special occasions. My other occasional hard liquor vice is Hennessy V.S. Cognac. And when I used to travel to Japan a lot, I used to enjoy sweet potato shochu.

    I'm really enjoying the craft brewing movement here. My favorite style is ever-changing, but right now I love a balanced, medium strength (~6% ABV), easy drinking American pale ale. Mayflower New World IPA is a favorite local example. That sounds boring, but I'm getting tired of "trendy" styles: high ABV doubles, spiced seasonals, the IBU arms race, sours, cloudy IPAs, etc. I also miss the cask conditioned ales I used to drink when I was working in England.

    For wine, I'm a big fan of Marlborough Sauvignon blanc. I'm not a frequent red wine drinker, but I had a thing for Malbecs for a while, and I really miss some of the Barossa Valley Cabernets I used to enjoy when I lived in Australia. Two that I remember are Grant Burge Corryton Park and Château Tanunda 'The Château'. It's a shame the Aussies don't export their best stuff.

  7. #7
    Mistaken for a man
    Registered: Jun 2000
    Location: Helsinki, Finland
    I mostly can't drink at all anymore, I get migraine and/or reflux pains But if I could, I have a cheap taste, I like half-dry champagne/sparkling wine the most (the half-dry sparklies are cheaper, so I assume they're considered less fancy ). And if it's very late night and need lots of energy for dancing or somesuch, the occasional tequila shot.
    One that I've still been able to sometimes drink a glass or two is Fresita, the sweet bubbly that's made with real strawberries. Yum

  8. #8
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    I like Glenlivet and Glenfiddich for the smoky taste. Like most here I don't buy them very often and only in winter. Whisky seems made for winter. There is a warm cider drink made from cloves, cinnamon sticks, orange slices, and a liberal dose of Captain Jack spiced rum which is quite tasty and will warm you up nicely. I put in enough to feel the alcohol in my nose. I like a nice moscow mule too but mostly in summer.

    Mostly I like a cheap sour sweet wine in lambrusco or blush. If I can get it maybe Portland Niagarra or Ocoee white muscadine. I've had ports and sherries I like if they are aged well. Not a big one for the dry stuff.

  9. #9
    Moderator
    Registered: Apr 2003
    Location: Wales
    Does anyone here make their own alcohol? Looks like I'll have to start brewing in the Spring and where we're going has loads of 'hedgerow' fruit for wine and sloes for gin. I haven't brewed for about 30 years so I'll be interested to see what I've remembered.

  10. #10
    New Member
    Registered: Oct 2017
    I'm from Denmark, and we have a pretty stong drinking culture (that sounds wrong).
    I often get a glass of wine or a beer with my dinner (also when dinner is nothing fancy, We have two kids, so it often isn't).
    I, as many others have transitioned from "drinking a lot of cheap stuff" when I was younger into only drinking more than one glass only on rare occasions... Lately I've been getting more and more into cocktails, as I like the artistic creation and display of them just as much as I like the taste. I get inspired on youtube and buy up all sorts of fun cocktail tools and gadgets from ebay just to try them out... Also bought a proper liqueur cabinet, which is getting near full.

    Another thing I have started drinking is apple cider... My wife and I bought a house 1½ years ago, which had an apple tree in the garden, grafted with 3 different apple varieties... I hated just seeing these apples rot on my lawn, so I started reading about cider production, bought a bunch of equipment, and now have 30 champagne bottles of homemade cider aging in my basement. Of course that necessitates some sample tasting every now and then, as well as drinking other ciders for comparison

  11. #11
    Southquarter.com/fms
    Registered: Apr 2000
    Location: The Akkala Highlands
    Quote Originally Posted by nickie View Post
    Does anyone here make their own alcohol?
    I homebrewed beer 3-4 years ago with mixed results. Was thinking about starting it up again, since I have already bought all the equipment necessary.

    I think it really needs to be something that is a labor of love - it's a lot of work, when you can just go out to the liquor store and get a great six pack for 10 bucks.

  12. #12
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    I like syrupy chick cocktails. I'm the one, when everybody goes to a bar here and gets draft beers and yaktori, I'll get a strawberry Manhattan with a little pink umbrella. So sue me. Or more like, I like drinks that go good with jazz clubs, Cosmopolitans and Martinis and Manhattans, on the sweet and 1950s swag end.

    I mentioned in another thread recently, the only alcohol I keep at my apartment these days is plum wine (umeshu), in particular the "black umeshu" version that tastes like it's been infused with brown sugar.

  13. #13
    Mistaken for a man
    Registered: Jun 2000
    Location: Helsinki, Finland
    Yes, cocktails, the fruity and sweet kind. Pina Colada or strawberry Margarita made with real fresh ingredients, aah Nice thing about cocktails, nowadays in many bars you can get a delicious mocktail, if you can't or don't want to drink alcohol.

    Sweetness, that reminds me I have a bottle of Amaretto... One of these days I'll try a bit of that with coffee and cream. Bailey's is good, too.

  14. #14
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    On the topic of cocktails BTW:


  15. #15
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2003
    Location: Location, Location
    I get the same vibe watching that video as I get watching the pitch videos of Kickstarter scams.

  16. #16
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2002
    Location: Edmonton
    Quote Originally Posted by demagogue View Post
    I mentioned in another thread recently, the only alcohol I keep at my apartment these days is plum wine (umeshu), in particular the "black umeshu" version that tastes like it's been infused with brown sugar.
    Yes, we had this when we were in Japan and loved it. Thankfully it’s actually not too hard to find here in Edmonton.

  17. #17
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2001
    Location: uk
    Quote Originally Posted by nickie View Post
    Does anyone here make their own alcohol?
    I make beer occasionally, have made wine in the past and absolutely certainly have never distilled my own kirsch because doing that without a licence (which is to all intents and purposes impossible to obtain unless you're running a decent sized commercial distillery) is very naughty indeed.

    Mostly at the moment I drink rum, Black Seal is the current favourite.

  18. #18
    Moderator
    Registered: Apr 2003
    Location: Wales
    Quote Originally Posted by Brethren View Post
    I think it really needs to be something that is a labor of love - it's a lot of work, when you can just go out to the liquor store and get a great six pack for 10 bucks.
    My calculations are that I could save 25p a pint on current prices here, more or less £1 a day which would save £365 a year which would pay 6 months electricity bill. This is good. We could all give up alcohol but I like it and my back needs liquid refreshment after a long day toiling in the fields! And we'll also need to do something with the apples so cider will be on the menu later in the year.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by nickie View Post
    Does anyone here make their own alcohol? Looks like I'll have to start brewing in the Spring and where we're going has loads of 'hedgerow' fruit for wine and sloes for gin. I haven't brewed for about 30 years so I'll be interested to see what I've remembered.
    Used to. Now that I'm finally not living on a shoestring grad student budget I'm going to get back into it at some point.


    For other drinks I'm usually more of a spirits person. I tend to prefer more stereotypically masculine mixed drinks like a rum and coke, old fashioneds, black Russians, etc. One of the drinks I like to have the most in practice is the gin n' tonic: it's a bitter drink so they're great for social occasions where you want to look like you're enjoying a drink without actually getting drunk.

  20. #20
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    I like Belgian beers, like those brewed in Trappist monasteries. Regular beer (Pilsener) from the Netherlands or Germany is also fine, although I prefer some brands over others.

    My preferences in wine are simple: I don't like it much.

    I'm also so-so on mixed drinks. I prefer to drink whisky pure instead of putting it in coke. A drink I do like is Bacardi Oakheart Spiced Rum & coke, but one or two is enough, I can't drink such a thing for a whole evening like I can with beer. I guess vodka/rum/gin + coke are decent to drink one or two of. I don't like anything mixed with orange juice or anything like that.

    I do enjoy a good cocktail in the summer like Mojito, Pina Colada, Sex on the Beach or Long Island Iced Tea.

    My favorite stiff drink is a neat single malt Scotch whisky. I'm always open to try new whiskies I haven't had yet. A decent blended whisky like Johnny Walker Black Label is fine too. Red Label is only good for mixing with coke. I really can't afford very expensive whiskies regularly, but I'm not that much of an elitist. Mid-price whiskies like Laphroaig, Glenlivet, Oban and JW Black are perfectly fine with me.

    I also like sweet liquors like Cointreau, Grand Marnier and Liquor 43, although the last one is almost too sweet. Jägermeister is fine too, but no to mixing it with Red Bull.

  21. #21
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Qantas
    I like Trappist style beers as well, although my favorites are not actually from Belgium. Probably my favorite brewer of Trappist style ales is Unibroue in Montreal, Quebec. Second, an actual Trappist monastery named St. Joseph's Abbey in Spencer, Massachusetts started a brewery a few years ago after learning the craft by working in Belgium. They have a golden ale that is somewhere in between a patersbier and a dubbel called Spencer Trappist Ale, which is a well balanced, medium strength (6.5%) ale that is casually drinkable but flavorful enough to be interesting. It hits the sweet spot for me. Some of the stronger Trappist ales we get here (e.g. Chimay blue) can overpower the palate unless you drink them very slowly, and they are typically only available in 750ml bottles here, so before you uncork one you had better be up to it.

  22. #22
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    I'd actually like to try American and Canadian micro-brewed beers, because I keep hearing good things about them. But they're almost impossible to find here in the Netherlands, unless you're willing to pay through the nose. I'm not interested in the major American brands, after trying Budweiser and finding it watery and bland.

    Belgian beers at least are affordable here. A recent favorite of mine is Affligem Dubbel. It's a 6.8% abbey beer, but not a Trappist. Sometimes I buy one or two of those when my weekend starts. I don't really drink by myself often, but usually at the start of the weekend I buy one or two decent beers for myself.

  23. #23
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2006
    Location: Washington DC
    Quote Originally Posted by nickie View Post
    My calculations are that I could save 25p a pint on current prices here, more or less £1 a day which would save £365 a year which would pay 6 months electricity bill. This is good. We could all give up alcohol but I like it and my back needs liquid refreshment after a long day toiling in the fields! And we'll also need to do something with the apples so cider will be on the menu later in the year.
    I enjoy homebrew, but I wouldn't get into it with the expectation of saving money. True, in terms of raw ingredients you pay less, but you also have to factor in the up-front costs of a brew kettle, mash tun, fermentation bucket, and bottling/capping. Plus if you want good beer you need to use grain rather than extract, so throw in the cost of a mill. And after all that it's dangerously easy to ruin a batch- I made a wonderful Scottish-style red ale last summer, then got a little full of myself and screwed up a Belgian wit. Insufficient grain extraction and a mild lactobacillus contamination resulted in a weak Belgian-style sour, which is safe to drink but not very pleasant.

    The real strength of homebrew, IMO, is being able to make exactly the style you like and age it. All macrobrews and most microbrews are given little time to age, with brewing to store shelves done in a couple of weeks and typically don't improve over time due to the stabilizers used. In contrast, I'll brew a 5-gallon batch and let it bottle-condition for a month before touching it, and if I draw out that batch over the course of a couple of months it gradually and noticeably improves the older it gets.

    All that said- after you put the requisite hours of work into brewing, wait and watch for the necessary days of fermentation, and sit patiently for the weeks it takes to adequately carbonate up and condition, you may be rather less inclined to drink four pints in one sitting. So you might end up saving money, just not in the way you'd expect.

    I haven't had the motivation to do another batch yet, so for the time being it's Glenlivet and Vieux Pontarlier for me.

  24. #24
    Moderator
    Registered: Apr 2003
    Location: Wales
    Quote Originally Posted by catbarf View Post
    I enjoy homebrew, but I wouldn't get into it with the expectation of saving money.
    I don't. But I have brewed before and I have saved money before and every penny will count this year. I can also use the 'no point in going out and buying anything, this'll be ready in a couple of days' factor!

  25. #25
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere
    my local liquor store sells bottles of wine for 3 bucks, enough said

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •