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Thread: Return of the Obra Dinn

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered: May 2004

    Return of the Obra Dinn

    Since I'm confident many of you will love this game when you eventually play it, I'm giving Return of the Obra Dinn its own thread.

    Obra Dinn is one of those special games that will be talked about for years, become a significant influence among game developers, and likely (or hopefully) spawn numerous imitators in the indie space. The thoughtful detail in this game is astonishing; I can't believe a single person made it. Every little nuance, every seemingly trivial prop carries a clue that could lead to a series of cascading epiphanies.

    So what is it? I think a lazy but useful description would be to consider it a blend of Clue, Sudoku, and Her Story. On Twitter, I've seen game journalists and game developers take up the phrase "3D Murder Sudoku" to describe it. And I've seen a few reviews use Her Story as a reference point.

    Superficially, when you look at screenshots and trailers, you might compare it to Gone Home, Firewatch, or Ethan Carter. But it really is its own animal, and at its heart is a complex non-linear logic puzzle. More than any of those games, it really is a challenging, non-linear investigative puzzler.

    Since I'm trying not to write too much (but failing, I know), I'll lean on a couple of quotes here:

    "Iím staggered by how clever it is. Iíve played every detective game going and never seen someone capture the thrill of deduction as this does."

    Matthew Castle, Rock Paper Shotgun Review
    "The goal is quite simple -- log the names and cause of death for each of the 60 people aboard the ship. This may sound tedious when reading it, but trust me, it is anything but."

    Patrick Hancock, Destructoid Review
    Like Gone Home, you freely explore a single complete and encapsulated environment rich with meaningful detail. But unlike Gone Home, there's no voice over or similar device to pull you through a narrative thread.

    The game's core mechanic is different than you might expect: You have a timepiece that allows you to visit the moment of death for a passenger or crew member of the Obra Dinn, an 18th century merchant vessel. These scenes begin with a black screen and an audio clip of the last seconds of a person's life -- and the sound design and voice acting is both fantastic and critical to the gameplay. After the sound clip ends, it cuts to a tableau you can explore. The scene is entirely static and you don't play it, you just explore the limited space and observe and note as many details as you can.

    I say it's different than you might expect because you don't view most of these death scenes in any particular order, and long after you've revealed and visited every moment of death, the game will go on. I've read reviews where the reviewer had only solved 15 of the 60 fates by the time he'd visited the last moment of death. I think I had about 30 left at that point. It's not the means to drip-feed the narrative to you; rather, it's just the information gathering phase of a full-blown investigation.

    You will revisit many of these wonderful little tableaus over and over again as you cross reference different details to unravel the story and fates of the Obra Dinn. Sometimes you'll revisit them just so you can listen to a character's accent or how he addresses another character -- it's thrilling how much these little details matter!

    The moments of death also reveal surprising little... directly. For example, you might encounter a person's last breath, but this moment came after he escaped his attacker and moved to a completely different part of the ship. And even after that moment of death, you still might not even know this victim's identity. So you might leave a scene not knowing who died, how he died, where he was attacked (or even if he was "attacked"), or who inflicted the killing blow.

    BUT... that scene may contain dozens of tiny, subtle clues to OTHER fates.

    Like a couple of reviews have said, I really hope other developers imitate and iterate on this gameplay. I even hope it directly influences the next games by Fullbright (Gone Home and Tacoma) and Campo Santo (Firewatch).

    "Iíve never played a game quite like Return of the Obra Dinn, but now that I have, all I want is more."

    Tom Marks, IGN Review
    For me, Obra Dinn fulfills something I've been craving. I love games like Gone Home and Firewatch, but after playing them I also wished I could play something like them that gave me more freedom in how I revealed the story and -- more importantly -- gave me some kind of real, tangible investigative challenge beyond a slow narrative reveal.

    Obra Dinn is exactly that game.

  2. #2
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Thank you for saving me the trouble of making the thread. I finished the game last weekend and I was also completely blown away by it. The way the individual details of the story start gradually falling into place is amazing, as is the feeling when you get confirmation that you've been on the right track. I think the dev describes it as "an insurance adventure with minimal colour", but it really is his best game so far (though, of course quite different from Papers, Please). Everything, from the voice acting to the story to the art style to the actual "puzzles" is so well made.

    The only criticism I would have about the game is its structure and pacing. It kind of pushes you towards uncovering more and more new scenes, but I found the game most enjoyable when I resisted that and tried to fill out as much as possible about what I saw. It definitely pays to look at everything in detail and make full use of the book, from cover to cover.

    Now I'm searching for let's play videos to watch how other people solved it and it's quite shocking how much I missed, even as I thought I was being reasonably thorough. It felt like there was just enough to solve the game, but now I'm seeing how other people went about some things completely differently and still reached the same conclusions. Also, it has been quite fun to see some of the reactions to the events of the game.

    For example, here's a playthrough I found where the guy has some amazing deduction skills: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8G4a...Tufsx4fFFW-Td_

    Speaking of which, if anyone knows a good playthrough (in English, German, Russian, or Japanese), I'd be interested in that.
    Last edited by Starker; 26th Oct 2018 at 16:43.

  3. #3
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    Thank you for saving me the trouble of making the thread.
    That's funny: I finished it earlier in the week, and since then I've been glancing at TTLG thinking, "Holy crap, how is TTLG not talking about this yet?!" Today I figured, "Maybe someone just has to get the ball rolling..." (Although it'll probably just get lost in the hype around RDR 2...)

    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    The only criticism I would have about the game is its structure and pacing. It kind of pushes you towards uncovering more and more new scenes, but I found the game most enjoyable when I resisted that and tried to fill out as much as possible about what I saw. It definitely pays to look at everything in detail and make full use of the book, from cover to cover.
    Part of that I agree with -- specifically, I wasn't crazy about the way it linked you to newly discovered corpses within a death scene. I found it a bit of a nuisance, but I'm not sure how to better handle that issue. The game developer needs to make sure you know there are other bodies to find in those scenes or you could get hopelessly lost in this game, but I didn't like the way the game tugged me through those series of scenes.

    Maybe not a spoiler, but I'll tag it just in case: But compared to what you describe, I think if I were to play it again with zero knowledge, I might hurry through the scenes solving even fewer fates, and then begin the investigation proper. Although I'll agree the fates that require intuitive leaps without perfect information were the most fun, and you can kind of create more of those by trying to solve as much as possible before you find all the scenes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    Now I'm searching for let's play videos to watch how other people solved it and it's quite shocking how much I missed, even as I thought I was being reasonably thorough. It felt like there was just enough to solve the game, but now I'm seeing how other people went about some things completely differently and still reached the same conclusions.
    I experienced something similar and it made me appreciate the game even more. Not only is it unlikely any two people will solve all the fates in the same order, but it appears unlikely people would use the same information to solve a good number of the fates.

  4. #4
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Well, one advantage of being more thorough from the beginning is that you have time to take notes and formulate theories, which can come very handy later on. But I also thought that the story worked better and I found myself more invested in the characters when there were more pieces falling in place in each scene.

    For sure, you could rush through the scenes without making as many connections and just fill them in later, but I think it's a much more haphazard process when you're chasing them all over the ship.

  5. #5
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    That makes sense: the more you've figured out, the more narrative pieces fall into place when you visit each death scene.

    Maybe my problem was my note-taking techniques. I switched my methods multiple times until I had a bit of a mess, and then I kind of started over in re-organizing my notes once I'd visited all the scenes.

    I think we both liked the same kind of things the best, but we experienced those moments at different points in the game because of our different approaches.

    And wow... isn't the sound design incredible? This commenter on the RPS review does a good job summarizing all the ways sound is cleverly implemented into the design:

    The way each and every line of instruction is displayed rhythmically, dancing along to a sea shanty during the intro. The way hearing the specific plunk of a ďWell doneĒ has your heart leaping into your throat each and every time. The way the game tracks your Fate progress in a spooky echo of the Countdown clock with its own wee fanfareÖ Even the swift click of a closing pocket watch as you move from a corpse. All this combined with the detail of the audio snippets and itís the most effective use of sound Iíve seen (heard?) from a game in years. And thatís not even mentioning the music. I revisited a few dioramas just to hear the tune that accompanied it.

    - Taffy
    I'll add that I loved the ambient sounds while walking around the ship... all the creaking, shifting old wet wood and the way the ambient sounds change when you descend below the water's surface within the ship...

  6. #6
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Not to mention the voice acting -- the way you're able to place a character just based on their accent was really neat. And really helpful with multiple people speaking in some scenes.

  7. #7
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Yes, I loved how being able to distinguish different accents and their origins was a meaningful part of the game. Even identifying the origin of non-English languages becomes a part of the game. Most of them are pretty obvious, but I have to admit: I didn't recognize the Hindi phrase. But as soon as I looked it up I had a revelation on a couple of fates.

    It surprised me that he just collected voice actors from locals, friends and aquaintances (as I understand it). It's all so well done, and it involves more important nuances and variables (like the importance of different accents) than many games.

    I guess the importance of accents and language origins ties into how there's always a clue to what you need to determine. It may not seem like it at times, but the clues are there somewhere.

  8. #8
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Yeah, it makes it just a little bit easier for people who are more versed in other cultures. There's also some stuff like being able to identify the guy from New Guinea based on his tattoos. On the other hand, it can be an obstacle as well. I've been watching a playthrough where someone who is not a westerner is not able to tell apart female and male names, for example. On the other hand, a few other things were made a bit more obvious to them by having some ambiguity removed in translation.

  9. #9
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    On the other hand, it can be an obstacle as well. I've been watching a playthrough where someone who is not a westerner is not able to tell apart female and male names, for example. On the other hand, a few other things were made a bit more obvious to them by having some ambiguity removed in translation.
    I need to watch some playthroughs. I'm really curious to see these different perspectives and approaches.

    Regarding the potential confusion and ambiguity of different cultures or languages approaching this game's problem-solving methods, over in the Steam discussion area the developer wrote this interesting post regarding these challenges. Given your experience with languages, I imagine this area is of particular interest to you:

    Quote Originally Posted by Lucas Pope
    Many of the correct fate variations are down to issues with localization. Something obvious or specific in English can be more or less broad in other languages.

    For a good example of this, in English we have the nice verb "knifed" which covers any usage of a knife including cut or stabbed. Unfortunately there's no such handy verb for being killed with a sword ("sworded?") so the fate entry has to appear as "Killed (Sword)."

    Imagine that issue projected across 9 languages.

  10. #10
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    You couldn't do much worse than the one I mentioned above: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8G4a...Tufsx4fFFW-Td_ I really wish I had played more like that guy. A word of warning, though. Youtube compression is not kind to this game, to put it mildly, so it's best to watch the videos at as high a resolution as possible.

    Regarding localisation, I haven't noticed many differences in the German playthrough so far (about third of the way in), but in the Japanese playthrough I watched, there were a lot. For example, where in the English it said "they" in the chapter Soldiers of the Sea, in the Japanese, it said "monsters", which kind of makes things obvious when you have to choose between "killed by enemy" and "killed by monster".

    I've also thought a lot about the structure/pacing issues I had with the game and I wonder if the game should have let you jump between memories more easily and perhaps gated the content a bit more to balance it. Also, a lot of the let's plays I've tried to watch seem to devolve into random guessing and running around the ship with no clear plan or methodology. Perhaps locking things down three fates at a time was a bit too lenient.
    Last edited by Starker; 27th Oct 2018 at 20:04.

  11. #11
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    I really don't think gating the content or breaking up the big 3D sudoku puzzle into smaller chunks is the answer here. Part of the game's core charm is its open, free-form, self-directed nature. I love how the last two fates I solve could be among the first 10 you solve. But when you watch some people play, it's apparent why you rarely see games be so open ended.

    In various forums, I've seen plenty of people express frustration at being lost, or running into a wall on what to do next or how to solve a few fates. But you can't compromise the core design of the game to try to make it "just right" for everyone. Given that the game is, at this point, still the most critically acclaimed PC game of the year and it has an "Overwhelmingly Positive" aggregate rating from Steam players, I think the game works well as is.

    I do wonder, however, if he had more help making the game he might have been able to iterate more on some of its systems. I think tightening some systems could help people keep a clear head as they try to focus on what to do next, and it could quicken the pace of the game.

    I'd most like to know why he forces players to find and walk to an exit door to get out of each death scene. Why not just use the timepiece to trigger a return to the present?

    I just watched someone come up with an idea for where to go next based on what he saw in the current death scene, then use the map to figure out where he needed to go on the ship to trigger the appropriate death scene to follow his lead. But by the time he traveled to the exit door and teleported to the corpse he used to enter the current scene, he became a little disoriented about where he had wanted to go next and then kind of lost his train of thought.

    I don't think that's all that common or entirely preventable, but he would have been fine if, after he decided what he wanted to do and where he wanted to go, he could have just used the timepiece to switch back to the present and be in the exact same location he was already standing within the death scene.

    I also think somehow making it easier and faster to move between death scenes would help, but I'm not sure how to implement that. If you just let people jump directly between any death scene, you'd risk losing the game's vital sense of place or the purpose for having a whole, contiguous ship to explore. Maybe just let people jump between death scenes within each chapter?

    It might sound silly, but I think a run key would help a little, too. I know if I were really on the ship for several hours and I was excited about a new epiphany, I wouldn't slowly trudge from one side of the ship to the other. Also, the game needs a jump key for frustrated people who'd rather just hop overboard and drown.

  12. #12
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    The more important questions here are whether the massive claims payout this would have resulted in for the ship, contents, and lives on board necessitated the company's actuarial and underwriting teams to include ghostly ephemera in their premium rate calculation and/or exclusion riders for future policies. Insurance is serious business after all.

    While I'm getting that mechanically this is more or less a great game, a question I have is that, given you're sorting out the fates of 60 people, how's the storytelling? I assume a lack of directed narrative is par for the course and it'll end up a series of individual vignettes of varying quality and affect.

    Also, this reminds me of The Sexy Brutale, a game I've yet to play, but one that sounds like it'd be at least in the same specific area of interest as this game. Anyone played that yet? Thoughts?

  13. #13
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Well, the game is already gating the content in terms of where you can go. Sometimes you can do things in a different order, but the branches are closed off rather quickly. And there's already an entire chapter closed off behind a hard gate. Personally, I think smaller chunks of the "sudoku" would have had a better flow, but a more structured progression could have done it as well. And a lot of this could have been done with simple messaging even.

    The problem I have with the game is that it does the opposite -- at times it actively discourages and hinders you from trying to solve things. For example, there's the timing mechanic that forces you out of the scene and into the solution page (often with incomplete information) and there's also the deduction rating tutorial that says you shouldn't try to solve the more difficult puzzles until later. For me, that was the sole reason I gave up on the brothers and moved on, even though I already had all the information to solve it on the spot and it actually made it harder to solve with more irrelevant spaces opening up after that.

  14. #14
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Sulphur View Post
    While I'm getting that mechanically this is more or less a great game, a question I have is that, given you're sorting out the fates of 60 people, how's the storytelling? I assume a lack of directed narrative is par for the course and it'll end up a series of individual vignettes of varying quality and affect.
    Given the open-ended nature of most of the game, I think the storytelling is surprisingly strong. I believe pulling that off is a main reason it's doing so well with critics. The mechanisms for delivering the story, their execution and performance, are fantastic.

    But, as you might tell from our discussion here, it is a case where your mileage may vary. If at some point you get stuck or feel overwhelmed with multiple, different leads, the pace might feel bogged down.

    Also, since the experience is largely self-directed, how you choose to take in the story will vary. Starker wanted to complete as many fates as possible before he opened new death scenes, which in turn may have made some new death scenes more meaningful when he experienced them for the first time. I think I preferred to open up as many death scenes as possible in a kind of information gathering phase, then review the story and narrative with those scenes revealed and organized within the in-game journal. Neither approach is wrong or right; it just depends on what works better for you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sulphur View Post
    Also, this reminds me of The Sexy Brutale, a game I've yet to play, but one that sounds like it'd be at least in the same specific area of interest as this game. Anyone played that yet? Thoughts?
    That's funny: The Sexy Brutale is among a few games I'm considering playing in the next few days (although I'm leaning more towards Detention). It looks pretty different to me, but I haven't played it yet either.

  15. #15
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Sulphur View Post
    While I'm getting that mechanically this is more or less a great game, a question I have is that, given you're sorting out the fates of 60 people, how's the storytelling? I assume a lack of directed narrative is par for the course and it'll end up a series of individual vignettes of varying quality and affect.

    Also, this reminds me of The Sexy Brutale, a game I've yet to play, but one that sounds like it'd be at least in the same specific area of interest as this game. Anyone played that yet? Thoughts?
    Some of the story in Obra Dinn is what you see and hear directly, but a lot of it comes from what you piece together based on that. It's fairly coherent, though. The vignettes in one chapter follow fairly close after each other and the chapters themselves tell a bigger story of the whole voyage. And it tends to keep you on your toes in terms of twists and turns.

    Sexy Brutale felt different to me. In that game, you're solving a specific set of puzzles of how to make things happen in a certain way and a lot of it has to do with being at a certain place at a specific time in order to get some information or an item or a power. And of course everything in the mansion is unfolding at the same time all at once. So you are unlocking and observing the pieces of one big happening, one by one, but that doesn't really relate to how you solve the particular puzzle you're working on. You just open the place up more and more and gather more and more powers.

    In Obra Dinn, however, it's more about observing the scenes and drawing conclusions based on the knowledge available to you in the book, so it's closer to Gone Home in that sense, actually. The scenes themselves are the puzzle.

  16. #16
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    Well, the game is already gating the content in terms of where you can go.
    Yeah, but that's very light gating, not unlike how Gone Home slightly gated where you could go in the house at the very beginning. The game is basically over before the hard gating at the end.

    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    Sometimes you can do things in a different order, but the branches are closed off rather quickly.
    Hmm... I'm not sure what you're referring to here. I don't remember any branches closing off (other than at the very end). Do you mean when it ropes you into discovering certain death scenes in sequence? Because those are just temporary, and after those sequences end you have more to explore and discover. Honestly, I have so little idea what you're referring to here that I'm preparing myself to feel embarrassed when you point out something obvious I'm forgetting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    For example, there's the timing mechanic that forces you out of the scene and into the solution page (often with incomplete information)
    Yeah, I didn't like that all. Ironically, I think that was an artificial attempt to push you forward and improve pacing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    ...and there's also the deduction rating tutorial that says you shouldn't try to solve the more difficult puzzles until later.
    It didn't say you should try to solve the more difficult puzzles until later... it just said some people's identity would be harder to deduce than others. Maybe you're conflating the deduction ratings with the earlier fuzzy image tutorial? I've read that some people believe they could have deduced some of the fuzzy photo people before the game let them, but even on a replay I don't understand how that would've been possible without having played before.

    I ignored the deduction rating, partly because I forgot about it, but also because: When it was introduced, the person it showed as an example "high" difficulty rating was really easy for me to identify right at that point (Emily Jackson: only two females left at this point; one was named "Miss" and the other shoved a big ol' wedding ring in your face in the Escape chapter), and then when I looked at Brennan's photo, it identified him as a "Low" difficulty when I still had no idea who he was at that point. So I didn't put much weight in those deduction difficulty ratings.

    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    Personally, I think smaller chunks of the "sudoku" would have had a better flow
    Obviously you're just trying to skew the game towards a younger audience.

    (But seriously, I've been impressed with your ability to tolerate and endure the temperamental complain train over there.)
    Last edited by Twist; 28th Oct 2018 at 23:00.

  17. #17
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Twist View Post
    Hmm... I'm not sure what you're referring to here. I don't remember any branches closing off (other than at the very end). Do you mean when it ropes you into discovering certain death scenes in sequence? Because those are just temporary, and after those sequences end you have more to explore and discover. Honestly, I have so little idea what you're referring to here that I'm preparing myself to feel embarrassed when you point out something obvious I'm forgetting.
    Yeah, I just mean the chains of memories you can go down until there are no more corpses to follow. Like A Bitter Cold would be one chain, Loose Cargo would be another, etc. Sometimes you have multiple corpses available at the same time, but one the corpses leads down a very short chain and closes off fairly quickly. Like in the captain's cabin you have the option of either finishing The End or starting a new chain, and during Escape, you have Murder available, which is pretty self-contained and closes off after three scenes. But other than that, there's a definite progression from The End to Doom to Escape to Soldiers of the Sea to Unholy Captives to The Calling.

    Quote Originally Posted by Twist View Post
    It didn't say you should try to solve the more difficult puzzles until later... it just said some people's identity would be harder to deduce than others. Maybe you're conflating the deduction ratings with the earlier fuzzy image tutorial? I've read that some people believe they could have deduced some of the fuzzy photo people before the game let them, but even on a replay I don't understand how that would've been possible without having played before.
    Well, it said something along the lines that you should try to uncover the people with easier deduction ratings first, which amounts to the same thing, basically. And because it pops up when you try one of the harder ones, it's comes across like a warning or at least I took it this way.

    Quote Originally Posted by Twist View Post
    I ignored the deduction rating, partly because I forgot about it, but also because: When it was introduced, the person it showed as an example "high" difficulty rating was really easy for me to identify right at that point (Emily Jackson: only two females left at this point; one was named "Miss" and the other shoved a big ol' wedding ring in your face in the Escape chapter), and then when I looked at Brennan's photo, it identified him as a "Low" difficulty when I still had no idea who he was at that point. So I didn't put much weight in those deduction difficulty ratings.
    Right, another good example why the warning is counterproductive, IMO. And I've seen a couple people give up on someone because they were "high difficulty". The rating also sort of encourages people to hunt around the ship for the easy ones to find the "weak link in the chain".

    Anyway, this is all rather hypothetical and this sort of armchair designing can easily fall apart in actual playtesting. It's just an area where I felt the game could have been improved further.

    Quote Originally Posted by Twist View Post
    (But seriously, I've been impressed with your ability to tolerate and endure the temperamental complain train over there.)
    Eh, there's some good criticism too among all the hand-wringing. The amount of vitriol towards the devs really does surprise me sometimes, though.
    Last edited by Starker; 29th Oct 2018 at 04:10.

  18. #18
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Sounds good, thanks for the explanation both. Probably picking this up in the near future on the strength of its design and execution.

  19. #19
    Administrator
    Registered: Oct 2000
    Location: Athens of the North
    Picked this up at the weekend based on feedback here and elsewhere and although I've not completed it the narrative storytelling is very well done and it's definitely grabbed me. I'm definitely going to have to replay it or spend a lot of time going back over all of the scenes to fill in the blanks - at times it's quite overwhelming to process everything that's happening in any one tableau and a lot doesn't make sense until the context is revealed later (it reminds me of the film Memento in that respect). I'm also struggling a bit at times where there's a lot of ambiguity about who is talking in the audio section prior to the scenes - I realise it's part of the puzzle but it would still be great if there was an indication that the conversation participant was someone you'd correctly deduced their fate. (At least you can tell who's the main subject for any scene but that was something I only realised an hour or two into the game!)

    Overall, really happy with it and the deductive aspect sets it apart from other "exploration" style games. Having to get involved with what's happened to each character pulls you in far more than being a passive participant despite the slight niggles with a couple of the game mechanics that have already been covered above.

  20. #20
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere
    playing it with my son and I must say, having someone else there watching is much better, discussing clues etc, good fun!

  21. #21
    Administrator
    Registered: Oct 2000
    Location: Athens of the North
    Just finished it and although it's not a game that readily lends itself to replay once you've solved all the fates it kept me engrossed until the end and I feel I got my money's worth for the ~12 hours or so that it took. That was actually split over two save games - the first was completed early because I thought that chapter eight would add some clues to the character's identities in other chapters rather than being self-contained. I had visited all scenes by that point but hadn't filled out every available fate. The second time allowed me to focus a bit more on the identification of characters and looking for more subtle clues. I completely missed the number of clues available in part 1 of the terrible cold the first time from arms and legs in the bunks. Highly recommended.

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