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Author Topic:   Anyone else think the True Game triple trilogy would be a great game?
Jennie
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posted April 30, 1999 10:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jennie   Click Here to Email Jennie     Edit Message
Ever since I read them I've thought you could make a great computer game out of Tepper's True Game books (Necromancer Nine etc.). Being a Shapechanger would be fun, or a Wizard.

What other writers do people really like? I've seen Feist and Pratchett both mentioned.
I don't ask for favorites because I always have too many to pick only a few.

Off the top of my head:

Patricia C. Wrede--particularly Sorcery and Cecelia and the Magician books.

Patricia McKillip--The first chapter of Harpist in the Wind is one of the great comic scenes in fantasy writing. Had me LOL.
(It's been a few years, maybe it's time to do some re-reading. Oh, and I consider Judith Martin aka Miss Manners hilarious, just so you are warned about how warped my humor is. She's the only writer who makes laugh as often as the incomparable Pratchett.)

Teresa Edgerton--Great celtic fantasy.

Katherine Kerr--Ditto, but darker.

Pamela Dean--The closest thing to Narnia since C.S. Lewis with her trilogy, even if I didn't understand it all.

Charles De Lint--Urban horror at its finest.

Guy Gavriel Kay--A great sythesizer of legends.

P.G. Wodehouse--Perfect fluff. Not, however, SF. Wish Elisa de Carlos would get cracking again.

Henry Mitchell--A great garden writer, now dead. Some real gems, including an explaination of sex amoung apple trees.

C.J. Cherryh--Hard work, very hard; worth every minute. Her SF is, in general, better than her fantasy. Cyteen. was an amazing book.

David Brin--Love his Uplift books. Thinking about reading the new Foundation book, but haven't read Bear's and the other guy's ones yet so I probably won't.

Jennie finds the library, it has comfy chairs, shelves of books, little privacy nooks, and cats. Everything necessary to a proper life. She sips her tea as she awaits commentary. She flips open John Barne's new book, the sequel to A Million Open Doors and continues with some resignation as it is not living up to its elder sibling. She will check this thread tomorrow, most probably; unlike Lytha, she requires sleep in order not to decapitate her household, of whom she is fond, really.


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Tim toddles over and hits the spacebar...arghh! (born 4/10/98 and already helping Mom with her computer).

[This message has been edited by Jennie (edited April 30, 1999).]

Digital Nightfall
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posted April 30, 1999 11:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Digital Nightfall   Click Here to Email Digital Nightfall     Edit Message
I've played a Shapeshifer before

ShadowCaster, by Raven.
Came out about the same time as Underworld 2

Awesome game, loved it. It had fog & colored lighting before 3D accelleration was a glimmer in somone's eye. All with the Wolf3D engine too. They need to do a 3rd Person sequal, ala Heretic 2.

CardinalFang
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posted May 01, 1999 12:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for CardinalFang   Click Here to Email CardinalFang     Edit Message
Hi Jennie! Glad to see you made it over to our little sandbox.

Would you believe I haven't read any of the authors you mentioned, except for Feist? I know enough about Pratchett to fake it (plus I have Good Omens, written by Gaiman and Pratchett), but the rest are mysteries to me. Ah, so many books, so little time.

Some of my favorite "obscure" authors would be Wilkie Collins (The Moonstone), Du Maurier (Rebecca), and, of course, Henry Kamen because of his seminal work, The Spanish Inquisition. Note: I really do own that one. It's not by coincidence that I happen to be a Cardinal.

And, of course, the well-known authors would take way too long to mention. Suffice to say, Tolkien, Doyle, Douglas Adams, Piers Anthony, Feist, James Clavell, and Arthur C. Clarke are all near-and-dear to my heart.

My wacky humor, is, of course, heavily influenced by those wacky Monty Python boys, (duh), who, at last count, were broken up. One of them is suspected of suffering from death as well.

They live on, though, in cassette tapes, CD's, and videos. Now that's humor, folks...

Without warning, Cardinal Fang's flip-top head opens up, and a highly agitated chicken flies out. The chicken is promptly squished flat by a giant foot coming down, accompanied by an appropriately rude noise.

[This message has been edited by CardinalFang (edited May 01, 1999).]

Jennie
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posted May 01, 1999 02:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jennie   Click Here to Email Jennie     Edit Message
I was looking through the used PC game pile at EB today and they had Shadowcaster, quite a coincidence. I picked up Betrayal at Krondar instead though; I've heard a lot of good things about it.

CF,

You must read Pratchett; I've been a fan of his since they were trying to market him as "The Douglas Adams of Fantasy", back in the old days, when he was difficult to find in the US and the covers were the wonderful Corgi covers instead of these boring things US publishers think we prefer. Back to my original thought, it was a vile, vile thing to say about Pratchett as he is hands down better than Adams. I say this as someone who liked The Hitchhiker's Guide. Here follows a quote from The Colour of Magic:

The Weasel pointed to the burning city.

"You've been through that?" he asked.

The wizard rubbed a red-raw hand across his eyes. "I was there when it started. See him? Back there?" He pointed back down the road to where his travelling companion was still approaching, having adopted a method of riding that involved falling out of the saddle every few seconds.

"Well?" said the Weasel

"He started it," said Rincewind simply.

Bravd and Weasel looked at the figure, now hopping across the road with one foot in a stirrup.

"Fire-raiser, is he?" said Bravd at last.

"No," said Rincewind. "Not precisely. Let's just say that if complete and utter chaos was lightning, then he'd be the sort to stand on a hilltop in a thunderstorm wearing wet copper armour and shouting, 'All gods are bastards.'"

Back to obscure authors. (was my list really obscure? The only one I thought obscure at all was Edgerton, and maybe Mitchell in this forum.) I liked The Moonstone also. My father gave me a bowlderized version when I was in sixth grade and I found it mystifying; I got the full version later and it was much more satisfying. I've also read The Woman in White. He certainly deserves to be better known than he is. I know of du Maurier, but haven't read much of her. I think she wrote The Crystal Cave which I read a while back, but I don't recall it particularly well. And Kamen is completely unknown to me, not being inquisitorial myself.

Of Feist's books my favorites are the ones with what's-her-name as the heroine. Her husband dies and she takes over the estate, it's all fairly oriental. Gah, brain-slip there.

And I have to admit I took against Clarke when I first read Childhood's End. I didn't like leaving Earth barren at the end. So I've avoided him pretty much since then; he got lumped in with what I call black books, I define them as well-written but depressing. Stuff like Animal Farm and Brave New World and that horrible one by John Hershey I read in high school and don't remember the title, people sell their "interest" in a small boy to a company so that they can remove his brain and use it as a computer. It must have been good, because I remember the plot well (it's been nearly twenty years after all); but I didn't like it.

Onward to more cheerful stuff. I know very little about Monty Python, only enough to fake it as you said about Pratchett. The only vivid memory I really have of them is the skit where the little old ladies are running wild. That was great!


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Tim toddles over and hits the spacebar...arghh! (born 4/10/98 and already helping Mom with her computer).

Ninja
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posted May 02, 1999 11:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ninja   Click Here to Email Ninja     Edit Message
Micheal Moorcock of course would have to be considered for any such list, and I believe there is already an Eternal Champion RPG around. I'm not sure that it would readily translate to a CRPG though, but if it were done well, 'twould be quite something!

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Men stumble over the truth from time to time, but most pick themselves up and hurry off as nothing happened.
--Winston Churchill

The Magpie
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posted May 03, 1999 05:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for The Magpie   Click Here to Email The Magpie     Edit Message
You know, yesterday I read a preview on gameprix.com of the upcoming Vampire: The Masquerade computer game called Redemption...

Is it just me, or do you guys get this feeling of déjà vu from reading it as well?

Watching this progress will likely become most interesting... I think we can discern a trend here.

--
Larris, the Magpie

Kyloe
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posted May 03, 1999 10:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kyloe   Click Here to Email Kyloe     Edit Message
It's funny to see what you consider obscure writers, CF. William Wilkie Collins and Rebecca DuMaurier are definitely not obscure. Maybe George DuMaurier is, but I would rather say people have forgotten about him.

Most of the books Jennie mentioned, I would consider "not canonical". If you enjoy Wodehouse, Jennie, why not read Evelyn Waugh. He's written a number of novels about the "bright young things". Start with Decline and Fall and work your way up to the brilliant A Handful of Dust.

Jennie
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posted May 03, 1999 12:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jennie   Click Here to Email Jennie     Edit Message
Decline and Fall Okay, next trip to the library I'll take a look. I've heard of the man, though always assumed he was a she, and am confident a library will find him. I tried Saki once on another Wodehousian fan's recommendation, and found him... unusual. Some stories I liked some I didn't. Didn't make it to my read and reread pile like Wodehouse did however, so I don't know him as well. I think my favorite W books are those with Gally Threepwood, particularly Cocktail Time.

Non-canonical. That's better than obscure, though I think Cherryh is close to cannonical and Brin already there.

Delves into memory for really obscure writers she likes. P.C. Hodgell (I've got to find her third book one of these days), Mrs. Gaskell (On the strength of Wives and Daughters, um not SF), Carolyn Stevemer, Jane Linskold (Wizard of Pigeons is great for a former NWster), Oh and Janet Kagen (wonderful to find a science fiction heroine in her fifties). Lessee must be more, but I'd have to go browsing the shelves to find them offhand.

I was meditating the other night on who the truly great Fantasy writers are. SF has their greats pretty well listed, but Fantasy hasn't made a list of must-reads yet, other than Tolkien.

I'd vote for Patricia McKillip for her Forgotten Beasts of Eld. Never cared so much for Ms. Le Guin, but lots of others do so she should make the list.

J.R.R. Tolkien
Ursula Le Guin
Patricia McKillip

With children's books the list gets much larger, as so many of them can be catagorised as fantasy. So I'm not including them here.

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Tim toddles over and hits the spacebar...arghh! (born 4/10/98 and already helping Mom with her computer).

CardinalFang
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posted May 03, 1999 04:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for CardinalFang   Click Here to Email CardinalFang     Edit Message
Kyloe: LOL

The authors I mentioned as "obscure" are all obscure to non-literature types. None of my friends from the business college have heard of any of them. I was never exposed to them in school. I picked them up on my own.

It's a sad fact, but what they teach as literature in the schools these days is Shakespeare, a few super-famous authors, and that's all. Who needs books when you have TV? I was lucky enough to be raised in a TV-free household, so I grew up being a bookworm... Then, I became a Cardinal, and now I spend all my time in the Vatican library reading pulp fiction from the 1400's...

I suppose it's a U.S. thing. Our government's too busy wasting money, so we don't have any money left to fund the schools. There just aren't enough government agencies yet, so education has to take the back seat.

Psst! Cardinal Fang is not really a Cardinal

Who said that?!!! Come back here!

[This message has been edited by CardinalFang (edited May 03, 1999).]

Keef
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posted May 03, 1999 10:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Keef   Click Here to Email Keef     Edit Message
Okay, since we're doing a book chat here...

Kevin Anderson did a little known trilogy called Gamearth that seems to count as obscure... oh, and another fave was David Eddings works... ever read Niven's Ringworld trilogy?... good stuff, if a bit contrived at times... did the Thomas Covenant trios as a youth, but find them a bit too maudlin nowadays... but for the gloomy out there, they are fine stuff... the Deryni series kept me going for a while... keep hoping for more of them, since Katherine Kurtz made such a huge background and has so much left in it...Thieves World... some fine tales there, I keep hitting the used bookstores to get them... then there are the classics.. Poe, Lovecraft, Heinlein... Those are just off the top of my head, as it were

Erp... and to think I forgot the Stainless Steel Rat... for shame... great campy stuff for filling in a dry afternoon

[This message has been edited by Keef (edited May 03, 1999).]

Abdiel
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posted May 04, 1999 03:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Abdiel   Click Here to Email Abdiel     Edit Message
ARRRRRRRRRGHHHH!!!!

Doesn't anyone else in the world read Connie Willis? She is the finest sci-fi/fantasy writer currently living for sure (if everyone that I THINK is dead is dead, that is). She wins awards all the time for her work (try the Hugos and Nebulas). She is hilarious, touching, poignant, and skilled with the language all at the same time. There are few works in the world that I would put up against her Doomsday Book. There are intelligent people here, lots of them. Hasn't ANY of you heard of her?

Tommyboy
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posted May 04, 1999 09:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tommyboy   Click Here to Email Tommyboy     Edit Message
A couple of my favorite writer are David Eddings and Howard Phillips Lovecraft. H.P. Lovecraft was also the major inspiration for the folks who created the Call of Cthulhu RPG. I'd love to see som PC-RPG buildt on H.P. Lovecrafts novels.

Kyloe
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posted May 04, 1999 12:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kyloe   Click Here to Email Kyloe     Edit Message
Jennie: Evelyn Waugh's (read "evil-") first wife's name was Evelyn (like in "ever"). The male version is derived from Ebeling, a Germanic name, AFAIK. What a gay couple the two Evelyns must have been! Vain, idle snobs, the life of every party.
Who's Saki?

Your Eminence: I don't believe in reading Shakespeare. Although I've read a few plays myself, Shakespeare should be seen on stage. It's the interpretation that can convey a true artistic value. The bard never saw himself as an artist; he was running a theatre, and had to come up with new plays all the time. Most of what's left over today isn't in his own words, anyway.
And don't blame the government or the TV for the fact that people don't seem to read as much as they used to. This "ubi sunt motif" is one of the oldest topoi in literature.

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$

[This message has been edited by Kyloe (edited May 04, 1999).]

Jennie
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posted May 04, 1999 01:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jennie   Click Here to Email Jennie     Edit Message
Was Connie Willis the one who wrote, can't quite remember the title, A Sorcerer and a Gentleman? I read the Doomsday book, and it was well done, but I don't remember funny bits. Thinks hard. Nope. Time travel, black plague, sad ending, yes. Good book though. If you liked her you might like Swordspoint by Ellen Kushner too. Or A Golden Compass and A Subtle Knife, I don't recall the writer's name. Phillips perhaps.

Eddings is great fluff, good for a relaxing afternoon. Silk is, of course, the favorite character for all us thieves. I have a great liking for Polgara as well. Perhaps sometime we'll learn more about Poledra too. It would take a very interesting character to marry that old man.

The Covenant series was a bit too gloomy for my taste, and it sometimes seemed if he took random synonyms from a thesaurus and threw them in. One of the great bad lines that sticks in my memory was something about stopping for "nutriment", they had lunch for goodness' sake. It's merely a grain of sand.

Katherine Kurtz' Deryni books are also good reads. And, unlike some writers, I think the later ones are distinctly better than the early ones. I liked the early ones too, but they were a little too predictable, good guy vs. bad guy etc. And she is one of the few writers to be really ruthless with her characters. I wish she'd stop on these urban horror collaborations and get back to her own world.

Another interesting, collaborative, world is that of Liavek. It has a unique magic system based on luck, and your luckiest time is the time your mother spent in labor with you (not hers, obviously). There is a monestary/retreat/nunnery type of religious haven for suicides, but you can't commit suicide until you've fufilled all of your responsibilities. I haven't seen anything new out in that universe for quite a while though. I think it's edited by Will Shetterly.

For some reason my mind classifies The Stainless Steel Rat books and the Retief ones together. I don't think they were written by the same guy, but they sure have the same feel to me. Maybe they are. Mind like a steel sieve! Wonder if you could build the Thief 2000 on the model of the SSR books? And I love how he has a marriage and children while being a wild wanderer. Helps all us married fogys feel like there could still be adventure in our lives.

It must be a quirk in me, but I found Lovecraft to be a bit of a giggle. Rather like those overly dramatic black and white vampire movies with maidens in filmy robes exploring tumbledown castles. I just couldn't suspend disbelief long enough to get scared. Poe on the other hand is truly frightening, I don't read him anymore because of that. Don't like cats getting their eyes cut out or people being bricked up. Good writer, but not my type of story. I can see Lovecraft as a computer game though, not sure it's one I'd buy, but I bet a lot of folks would.

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Tim toddles over and hits the spacebar...arghh! (born 4/10/98 and already helping Mom with her computer).

Kyloe
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posted May 04, 1999 01:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kyloe   Click Here to Email Kyloe     Edit Message
Wanna read some pulp fiction from 1794, your Eminence? Check out Matthew Lewis' The Monk. There's the Spanish Inquisition for you. But beware! It's not a mere Gothic Novel. This will creep you out.

Jennie
Member
posted May 04, 1999 01:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jennie   Click Here to Email Jennie     Edit Message
Wow. I spent a long time on that post, as I didn't see your question about Saki until I'd replied. He has a full name, but I don't remember it. He writes in about the same time period as Wodehouse, but is dryer, darker, and more fantastical. You'll find him under Saki in the library or bookstores (at least I did).

mutters: I must get my books sorted, I must get my books sorted....

CardinalFang
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posted May 04, 1999 01:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for CardinalFang   Click Here to Email CardinalFang     Edit Message
Kyloe: Ubi sunt motif? Shakespeare purist? topoi??!! Where does a student of engineering and English become exposed to such trappings of academia? What is the world coming to? Grown people should not speak this way! (I used to be an English major. What's your excuse? ).

Well, probably you are as sick of these topics, as am I. I renounced the evils of academic thought processes when I went into business. Sigh.

Thanks for the recommendation. I will look for The Monk the next time I'm in the library.

Cardinal Fang returns to one of Jennie's novel-length posts, searching for good book ideas...

Jennie
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posted May 04, 1999 01:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jennie   Click Here to Email Jennie     Edit Message
Pratchett, Fang, read some Pratchett.

Kyloe
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posted May 05, 1999 01:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kyloe   Click Here to Email Kyloe     Edit Message
I'm not studying engineering with a bit of English in it. I'm doing the full English and American literature and linguistics thing plus mechanical engineering (a little less than the real engineers). Add educational studies and a little sociology and psychology and you get.....a bloody teacher.

Kyloe
Member
posted May 05, 1999 01:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kyloe   Click Here to Email Kyloe     Edit Message
Thought this was apparent by now. *shrug*
And CF, do read Pratchett!

Jennie
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posted May 05, 1999 10:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jennie   Click Here to Email Jennie     Edit Message
Kyloe, the library has ordered in Decline and Fall from another branch, so I should have it soon. I'll let you know what I think in a week or so.

CF Good Pratchetts to start with would be:

The Colour of Magic--the actual first book in the series. It and its companion are more sarcastic than most of the others, and the characterizations haven't quite settled down into what they will be.

MortThe first in the Death books.

Guards! Guards!The First in the Watch series. Sub-series?

I can't remember the first in the Granny Weatherwax series, can anyone help me out here?

The Pyramids is pretty stand-alone as I recall, and so is Small Gods.

Just thought you might have wondered where to start and that was why you hadn't.
There are twenty-some of them after all.

Oh, it popped into my head last night that the Retief books are by Laumer and the SSR by Harry Harrison. Sorry if I confused anyone.

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Tim toddles over and hits the spacebar...arghh! (born 4/10/98 and already helping Mom with her computer).

Kyloe
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posted May 05, 1999 02:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kyloe   Click Here to Email Kyloe     Edit Message
The first witches-novel is Equal Rites, the third discworld book. This one features only Granny Weatherwax, and the coven get together no sooner than Wyrd Sisters, a pastiche of Macbeth.

Like Pratchett, Evelyn Waugh's first novel is a little different and maybe immature compared with his later pearls. But if you read them consecutively, you will find that some characters reappear all the time. The list is this:
Decline and Fall
Vile Bodies
Black Mischief
A Handful of Dust
- my favourite! Also a great movie with Kristin Scott Thomas.
Scoop
Put out more Flags

Less comical, but a good read anyway, is his Sword of Honour trilogy and there is his masterpiece, Brideshead Revisited, which spans from 1920 to 1940 and sums it all up, really.

Jennie
Member
posted May 12, 1999 09:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jennie   Click Here to Email Jennie     Edit Message
Kyloe,

Got Decline and Fall from the library, as soon as I finish Good Omens I'll let you know how I liked it.

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Tim toddles over and hits the spacebar...arghh! (born 4/10/98 and already helping Mom with her computer).

Kyloe
Member
posted May 13, 1999 12:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kyloe   Click Here to Email Kyloe     Edit Message
I was looking for Saki in the library, and it said "see H. H. Munro". By the time I went over to M, I forgot the spelling and ended up looking for an obscure book by one H. Monro. I was quite disappointed that it wasn't a proper story (this was a scholarly book).

Later I realized my mistake, and I have now the novel, a critical analysis, and a biography including six short stories by Hector Hugh Munro.

He has quite a dark pessimistic air, but I can't say I don't like him. BTB, the novel is called The Unbearable Bassington.

Jennie
Member
posted May 13, 1999 01:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jennie   Click Here to Email Jennie     Edit Message
All I've read is some of the short stories, and that was a while ago. I remember them as quite funny in a dark manner, and a bit spooky.

Kyloe
Member
posted May 14, 1999 04:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Kyloe   Click Here to Email Kyloe     Edit Message
Forgot to mention, the introduction is by Evelyn Waugh!.

Jennie
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posted May 14, 1999 09:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jennie   Click Here to Email Jennie     Edit Message
Sycronicity! (sp!) chuckles

redEye
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posted May 15, 1999 01:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for redEye   Click Here to Email redEye     Edit Message
ok, really mainstream, but still an obligatory read: Robert Jordan. it's just good stuff, and there's much reading to be done.
oh, and i'll probably check some of this out this summer... have yet to read Pratchett.

-redEye

Jennie
Member
posted May 26, 1999 12:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jennie   Click Here to Email Jennie     Edit Message
Kyloe,

I have now read Decline and Fall. It took me a while to digest it, and I got sidetracked by some other things. I liked it, but not as much as I like Wodehouse. Waugh has a much darker and relevant sense of humor; he comments on the society he depicts, rather than tossing froth into the air. I will order Vile Bodies tomorrow or Saturday (depending which day I get to the library).

Everyone,

In another example of syncronicity two other books I read recently were also set in the British school system. Marion Babson wrote one with a title something like Schooled in Murder, I don't remember it exactly. And one called Harry Potter and the Socerer's Stone. The Babson was a surprise to me, she usually specializes and a light and frothy style that I enjoy, as you can probably tell from my fondness for W; but this one read a lot more like Robert Barnard, whom I need to be in the right mood for. (Kyloe, is that a correct use of whom, it sounds right to me, but my formal training is weak.) A good book, still, and a good ending; she doesn't cheat as some mystery writers do, nor does she make it obvious. The Harry Potter book is a young adult book of the best kind, all about a young man going to a school for wizards. Fun and nice reading on a day of rain and sniffles.

Let's see I also read Brin's final book in his second Uplift trilogy. I found it a bit too philosophical for my taste. His Uplift universe is an amazing concept though, and I always enjoy the different species he populates it with. This time the book seemed unfocussed, as if he wasn't quite sure where he was going with it and didn't have time to tighten it at the end, or got a bit bored. My favorite is still the one with the gorillas.

I like Robert Jordan too. He is much better than Terry Brooks, and a better storyteller than Terry Goodkind. One thing that Jordan does in at least some of his books that helped me once I figured it out, is that the picture at the start of the chapter tells you who the viewpoint character is. The only specific one I remember is that Mat has the dice. And he has a lot of characters.

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Tim toddles over and hits the spacebar...arghh! (born 4/10/98 and already helping Mom with her computer).

[This message has been edited by Jennie (edited May 26, 1999).]

Thumper
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posted May 26, 1999 01:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Thumper   Click Here to Email Thumper     Edit Message
Speaking of books, how about Zelazny's Jack of Shadows?

Jennie
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posted May 26, 1999 01:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jennie   Click Here to Email Jennie     Edit Message
I read Jack of Shadows, I know I did; but I don't remember much of it. All I recall is thinking that it wasn't one of his better books. That was at least seventeen years ago though. Should I try it again? My favorite of his stuff is Lord of Light. Then the Amber series.

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