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Thread: NOW what are you playing?

  1. #12726
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    GRIS. It's like a Nifflas artistic platformer, but much prettier, more emotional, and not as challenging (as a platformer).
    It's more simple puzzles on platforms than actual platforming. I was moved.




  2. #12727
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Ornis View Post
    Contra III: The Alien Wars is not my usual kind of game, but I've found it oddly therapeutic and enjoy the body horror. Run and gun, don't worry about anything except what's on screen, it's good after a mentally taxing day when I still need something to do to hold my momentum between important stuff.
    It was my first game on the SNES, only it had robots as the main characters and a different title (Probotector). I can probably run it backwards, if I had to.

  3. #12728
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Spotted this on Steam tonight and knew I MUST HAVE IT



    It's just... the most punk rock game I've ever laid eyes on. For years I've wanted to make something like this. Something unredeemably ugly and violent, preferably with a blaring Death Grips-esque soundtrack. I was imagining crude MS Paint graphics for my game, but this game's choice of low resolution photo-cutouts is a much better artistic choice.

    The game itself is simple, ugly, hard(I recommend playing on Easy), poorly translated from Russian, only 59 cents at the moment, constantly throwing unexpected twists at you, and fucking gorgeous.
    Last edited by henke; 12th Feb 2019 at 00:41.

  4. #12729
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    That looks meh, but mildly interesting.

  5. #12730
    PC Gamering Smartey Man
    I <3 consoles and gamepads

    Registered: Aug 2007
    Location: New Zealand
    Quote Originally Posted by Ornis View Post
    Contra III: The Alien Wars is not my usual kind of game, but I've found it oddly therapeutic and enjoy the body horror. Run and gun, don't worry about anything except what's on screen, it's good after a mentally taxing day when I still need something to do to hold my momentum between important stuff.
    How appropriate that this was posted the other day.


  6. #12731
    PC Gamering Smartey Man
    I <3 consoles and gamepads

    Registered: Aug 2007
    Location: New Zealand
    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    It was my first game on the SNES, only it had robots as the main characters and a different title (Probotector). I can probably run it backwards, if I had to.
    Ah yes, Europe where violence was heavily censored back in the day. It's the complete opposite in US, gratuitous violence is a-okay but sexual imagery has them acting like Victorian puritans. Mortal Kombat 11 has been hyped as having the most brutal fatalities to date.




    Meanwhile the depiction of characters...



    The cultural dichotomy is very interesting to observe.
    Last edited by EvaUnit02; 12th Feb 2019 at 16:27.

  7. #12732
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Most of the changes in localization in Europe were due to Germany, where you couldn't have a video game where people shot people, for example. Hence the robots, which, IMO, were much cooler anyway.

    Also, it's not like US companies have been less "prudish" with things like violence when porting their games over to consoles. I remember Wing Commander had all the swearwords taken out on SNES, for example, and the same happened to Duke Nukem on N64. A lot of it has to do with Nintendo's marketing in the West and their desire to appear especially child-friendly and avoid any and all controversy with alcohol, drugs, religion, etc.

  8. #12733
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    All that means is most people skipping the censored versions and getting the better uncensored version from elsewhere.

  9. #12734
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Remember, this was the time when all information came from gaming magazines. I had no idea that the US version even existed and when I eventually found out, I didn't rush out to buy the "uncensored" version. And it doesn't really matter to me to this day, because the gameplay is identical and the Contra guys look kind of stupid anyway. I've also played quite a few of the original "uncensored" games since then and found that most of the changes are really pretty much inconsequential in the grand scheme of things.

  10. #12735
    New Member
    Registered: Jan 2019
    Location: Canada
    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    It was my first game on the SNES, only it had robots as the main characters and a different title (Probotector). I can probably run it backwards, if I had to.
    Mine was probably Super Mario World. I had the DKC trilogy (which I loved and still do), and other games which weren't quite up my alley as the console was a hand-me-down from a family friend.

  11. #12736
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    DKC was my second game. Still one of my favourites. I also remember playing Super Mario World all through the weekend to get the most out of the rental time.

  12. #12737
    Tried to play Deadly Premonition again. Enjoyed it a little more this time, but I have a repeatable crash now in Episode 2 that I can't fix so I guess off it goes.

    Gave Capsized and Anomaly Warzone Earth another shot. The controls in Capsized are so bad I can't be bothered, and Anomaly is boring as hell. So that's two more I can forget about.

    Up next is Gat Out Of Hell.

  13. #12738
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Moyer View Post
    Up next is Gat Out Of Hell.
    This is essentially Saints Row 4.5 when it comes to humour and gameplay. If you liked 4 and wanted more, this provides that. If you didn't like 4 or grew tired of it, you're likely to have the same reaction to Gat Out of Hell.

  14. #12739
    Quote Originally Posted by demagogue View Post
    @qolelis, as you're into surreal games, you might like Mu Cartographer, or anyone else into that style.
    Thanks for the tip. I wasn't entirely convinced when reading about the game on Steam, but then it was 80 percent off in the latest sale, so I got it -- and I don't regret it. There was a slight threshold to get over, but once I did, it was quite captivating. The feeling of actually discovering something on your own is definitely there -- and doubly so as you explore both the interface and the world that this machine you're controlling is set to scan. The same day I played The Novelist, which, in one route, had the father hide a beautiful seashell in the sand for his son to find. He could have just given it to him, but that wouldn't have been the same. Mu Cartographer does the same thing, but is at the same time the seashell. I also played TIMEframe recently and, after having finished it, I watched someone else play it, and they talked about the feeling of playing a game you quite don't know what to expect from -- or you might even expect it to be crap -- but then, once you play it, you end up loving it.

    I think the reason for Mu Cartographer pulling off what it does is that the interface is actually a functional interface. Every control has its purpose and there is feedback: just like a metal detector beeps in different ways as you scan your surroundings and fiddle with the knobs, so does the Mu instrument -- although the Mu beeps might not be as obvious and the manual is missing. The whole experience reminds me of someone I ended up working with once in an electronics course at uni: She was all over the place. Kind of hyper. She would have loved the Mu instrument.

    Edit:
    I wouldn't call it "surreal", more like "unreal" or... uhm... "otherreal".

    Quote Originally Posted by demagogue View Post
    GRIS
    Oh, Gris, Gris, Gris... I want to like you, but I can't. It's like that someone you've had the hots for for a while, but, when you finally work up the nerve to talk to them, they end up being kind of empty and not at all engaging. You want to like them and you try for a while, but you were just letting their looks fool you. After breaking up, you think about maybe giving it a second try, but, deep down, you know it most likely won't be any different. In Gris's case I think it's the platforming that's getting in the way, and whatever metaphor is there to tell a story is lost on me.

    Quote Originally Posted by qolelis View Post
    Prominence
    One more thing: It reminds me a little of INFRA, offering a kind of urban exploration, albeit with the places we get to explore only recently abandoned. One difference is that Prominence lets us restore the former functions of the facilities we find to a much wider extent than INFRA did. One being a fully realized 3D explorer and the other being a point & click, of course makes the two very different as well, but there are similarities that might perhaps make fans of INFRA also to some extent like Prominence.
    Last edited by qolelis; 13th Feb 2019 at 13:46.

  15. #12740
    Southquarter.com/fms
    Registered: Apr 2000
    Location: The Akkala Highlands
    I played a little Sniper Elite 4 last night, seems fun so far. It's kind of like a World War 2 version of Hitman. Nice big wide open levels, where they pretty much leave it up to you on how to get the job done. You can be as stealthy or aggressive as you see fit. There are also some environmental hazards that you can use to your advantage to add some variety. In regards to the shooting, it's not strictly sniping, you can go close range at times and use a silenced pistol, or grab an uzi and turn it into more of a shooter. Lots of opportunity for variety. You can even avoid most of the grunt type enemies all together. There's a tactical side to the game, of course, using technical stuff like wind speed and gravity for your shots, bu you can bypass all that by playing at a lower difficulty level.

    Anyway, as a Hitman clone, you could do much worse, but I would wait for sale to grab it if you're not sure (just picked it up for 80% off in the last Steam sale).

  16. #12741
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    I've played some challenging Metroidvanias before, but wow is Holly Knight hard (you can see as such from my Twitch streams on it ).

    Man of the bosses have taken numerous attempts, due to the map stuff you can get into tricky situations quickly with lots of souls on the line, and the whole place is just HUGE. This game is not for casuals, it's hardcore gamers only. Just as with Dark Souls (of which this game takes major inspiration from, even though it's a Metroidvania). One annoying bit is that you don't see the health of bosses. Even Dark Souls / Demon Souls / Bloodborne and the 2D Castlevania's show boss health, as you then at least know how your going. Not knowing just makes things even more insane.

    One boss took me something like an hour and a half to beat. But then I discovered to my horror that that was the first of 2 battles in a row with that boss. Gah. I beat him eventually, but still. Required learning it's attack patterns.

    Really enjoying the game regardless.

  17. #12742
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2004
    I picked up Recettear: An Item Shop's Tale recently being in the mood for a management/JRPG faire and... I can't believe the game is rated as high as it is.

    The core idea is very clever and the characters are charming, but the gameplay is... bland as fuck. Go to market, buy items, sell them at 120-130% markup, over and over and over. The little girl is always whines about price being too high, the tall dude will take a higher price. Once you get the gist, there really isn't much more thought involved.

    My other big groan - to keep up with the debt, you have to go dungeon crawling, which is equally bland. You see the same 5 types of enemies spread on 5 levels in dungeons that look all the same. There's no real thought in combat (approach, slash, approach, slash), there are no puzzles or mysteries, there's no real progression either (I'm on the 2nd level of 2nd dungeon and it still feels like I'm doing the same thing over and over). The bosses are interesting, but you have to get through 10mins of grind fest to get to each one.

    Just not feeling it :/

  18. #12743
    Thing What Kicks
    Registered: Apr 2004
    Location: London
    Yeah, I got bored of Recettear real quick too, even though I loved the premise.

    It's a similar story with Majesty. The idea sounds great, but then you play it and it's little more than a poorly designed RTS with an incredibly spiky difficulty curve, poor attempts at humour and little to no feeling of progression.

    I think there's a gap in between those two games that someone could really exploit, scratching that management / god game itch that so few games do.
    I've always loved games where you influence the AI rather than directly control them, and I find city builders to be slightly too far removed to remain personal and generate interesting stories.

    Of course, Dwarf Fortress sits pretty firmly in that gap, and I do dearly love it, but until Toady spends some time seriously addressing performance, it'll always be an exercise in frustration for me.

    I always wished the Black & White games had had skirmish / sandbox modes. Those would have also sat in that gap quite nicely.

  19. #12744
    Quote Originally Posted by Yakoob View Post
    (I'm on the 2nd level of 2nd dungeon and it still feels like I'm doing the same thing over and over).
    As far as i remember, that means you have yet to unlock any of the additional heroes. And there are more than 5 enemy types, but they're introduced fairly slowly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Malf View Post
    I think there's a gap in between those two games that someone could really exploit, scratching that management / god game itch that so few games do.
    I've always loved games where you influence the AI rather than directly control them, and I find city builders to be slightly too far removed to remain personal and generate interesting stories.
    I'm currently following an Early Access title called Driftland: The Magic Revival, which plays like a cross between Majesty and Netstorm. There's currently no campaign or multiplayer, but the next patch is supposed to have the first campaign and multiplayer is planned to be the last big thing before the full release. It may be too sim lite for your taste, but try looking at some ingame footage.

  20. #12745
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    My design doc for my French Revolution sim tries to hit that mark. I liked the idea of competing factions vying over something like the soul of their respective neighborhoods at the really local level... So when you go the clergy route, you're a local church priest really trying to keep your parishioners loyal to the church when everything around is falling apart (to the level of home visits and "serving" their needs), or you're a noble trying to hold on to the loyalty of people that can protect you, or you're a Robespierre-like revolutionary trying to keep the momentum going & destroy as much of the nobility class as you can without it biting back... Basically you're trying to push the envelope for your position while keeping your constituency loyal enough to you to protect you from the counter-reactions or themselves not turning on you. It's gaming AI attitudes, especially loyalty. It's what Crusader Kings does in the ways it lets the player engage with different characters, but I wanted to do that on a small & very personal & concrete scale of characters physically interacting, I guess like Dwarf Fortress now that you mention it. (The old game Shogun did it small scale, but not very intuitively.) Well, it's all just academic until it actually gets made anyway.

    But I wanted to post about was Gris. My post up there was charitable because I like people's first impression of a game to be charitable, to give it its best chance to live up to what it wants to be doing. Then the critical stuff can come later. The impression that struck me ... well empty is one word for it. But what it reminded me of was this trend, or more like a tone and aesthetic, that's widespread in casual artistic games, a lot of mobile games have it, where they're creating this artistic "emotional" experience, but it's a little too manufactured to really sink in, and you can almost feel what they really care about (and it's not any kind of real spiritual engagement).

    There are parts of Gris that make it easier for me though. One, I can connect to a game that connects with other people I care about, even if it wouldn't for me by myself. Like my mother was touched & amazed by Avatar, and even when I was watching it all the now-familiar red flags were going up for me, but I liked spending that time with her being moved and amazed, and it being a real experience for her made that a real experience for me. Gris has that going for it. The other thing is the dominant motif is grief, the kind that literally pulls you to the ground. These kinds of elemental and strong emotions, like deep grief or love or exhilaration or fear, can mean something to me.... Even if the packaging is off, a person in real grief, or the expression of that, is a real thing I can respect. The other thing is, just from an art design perspective, to someone that thinks about it for their own games, it has a really great aesthetic I like for its own sake (except the animations are a bit too pared down, which make it feel even more like a flash game).

    But if I were writing a critical review of it, I'd probably knock it a number of points because it's a bit too ham-fisted and "casual" for the themes and artistry it's feigning at, and "puzzle games" are kind of fraught territory for that to begin with.

  21. #12746
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2014
    Location: Istanbul, Turkey
    Quote Originally Posted by Malf View Post
    Are you running a seasonal character, or normal?
    I've staved off of playing Seasonal now, and would rather just progress my main characters when I feel like playing D3.
    My profile's over here.
    Sorry for my late reply; I haven't been around.

    I am running a normal character. I couldn't care less about seasonal runs. I have sent you a friend request if you don't mind. I would also like to clarify that I have started from scratch, meaning I do not have a decent set of gear. Playing on Torment I difficulty for now.

  22. #12747
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    D3 sounds like a very different type of beast to the other 2 games. I've not once heard a single person talk about the plot for the game. Only hear about 3 things:

    1. Loot
    2. Gear
    3. Difficulty

    And thats it. What happened? Sounds more like a MMO.

    And Activion's gone and fired 8% of Blizzard's employees (which was about 500 I think). Sad days. Companies going down the toilet unless they leave Activision while they still can.

    And what happened in the same week all those employees got fired? The CEO awards himself a 15 million bonus for "good work".

  23. #12748
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: the Sheeple Pen
    Quote Originally Posted by icemann View Post
    D3 sounds like a very different type of beast to the other 2 games. I've not once heard a single person talk about the plot for the game.
    What? There was a plot in the first two games?

  24. #12749
    Quote Originally Posted by icemann View Post
    And Activion's gone and fired 8% of Blizzard's employees (which was about 500 I think). Sad days. Companies going down the toilet unless they leave Activision while they still can.

    And what happened in the same week all those employees got fired? The CEO awards himself a 15 million bonus for "good work".
    While I don't like what's happened over at Activision, what you present is a somewhat skewed and oversimplified brief of the situation.

    Kotic did get 15 million, but those millions were a bonus from stipulations on corporate profits in his contract. And 2018 was a decent year for Activision, however growth seems to have stagnated across the industry (outside Epic pulling in billions from Fortnite), so to show continual growth to investors (current and potential future ones) the company needs to cut whatever expenses they can. In most corporations that means cutting whatever jobs aren't vital to the core business.

    What happens if they don't show growth? Investors sell their stock to get stock in other companies that show growth. This in turn drops the stock value of the company, which leaves the investors who haven't gotten out yet miffed. A large group of miffed investors is likely to mean the end of the job for the CEO. And Kotic does not want to lose his job if he can avoid it. With the minimum wage in California and the amount of people laid off*, the money saved for 2019 by doing so is more than the bonus Kotic received.

    The above is still a brief that doesn't touch upon everything, but the short of it is that a) stuff like this is business as usual and b) it will happen again and again. At least as long as there are game companies on the stock market.

    *The people laid off were from all of Activision, not just Blizzard, and they were almost all in customer service or related fields. Developers were specifically avoided as a target for the mass layoffs.

  25. #12750
    Thing What Kicks
    Registered: Apr 2004
    Location: London
    Quote Originally Posted by Tomi View Post
    What? There was a plot in the first two games?
    Yeah, I was a bit confused by that too. Diablo's always been about loot/gear and difficulty.

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