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Thread: Mobile Phones could be cause of massive bee deaths

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2002
    Location: Sacramento, CA

    Mobile Phones could be cause of massive bee deaths

    http://news.independent.co.uk/enviro...cle2449968.ece

    My family has been taking care of a hive. All the bees died recently under mysterious circumstances. Ouch.

    While certainly not conclusive, this seems like a likely theory.

    If so, we're kind of fucked. By the time governments banned cell phones (something the incredibly powerful cell phone lobbies and the cell-phone using masses would fight tooth and nail) all the bees would be dead, and then we are totally fucked.

    It also mentions how cell phone radiation has been found to kill brain cells. Vunderbar!

  2. #2
    Previously Important
    Registered: Nov 1999
    Location: Caer Weasel, Uelekevu
    The problem isn't bee death, the problem as I understand it is the spontaneous abandonment of hives with the added bonus of not leaving a forwarding address.

    And it has to do with the relay towers -- and other large EM field-generating things like hydro corridoors etc -- and it's only one of a bunch of current theories for the colony collapses. Not even the strongest one, at that.

    My own pet theory is that certain frequencies of radiation / vibration etc are really violently disruptive to the development of a creature's nervous system. I don't have a theory yet as to what the result of such a disruption might be other than slightly malformed (though obviously still viable) neural architecture and associated goodies, but I do like to throw around the idea of sudden and mass disorientation / psychotic break. Because I'm an Apocalypsist like that.

    Mmmm... Bee Apocalypse...

    Obviously I'm no apiarist, but this subject has fascinated me for months and I've tried to read whatever I can find on the subject. I think it's a little more salient around here because apparently honey is a massive crop in California.

    This also reminds me of my utter conviction several years ago that a prime factor in Gray's insomnia and general state of poor health was due to a massive hydro corridoor nearby. I think. Something along those lines, anyway. Who knows what they do in Sweden? They're all crazy.

    As far as the "cellies fry you brane" theory goes... It's extremely plausible, but the research is in such faltering infancy that no conclusions are yet warranted. The downside of a positive finding vis a vis cell phones vs tissue is that we suddenly have to rethink almost everything our culture, economy, and medicine is built around.

    But yeah.

    Bees.

    Who knew?

  3. #3
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2000
    Location: sup
    Are bees the primary source of pollination?

    In any case, still a very curious and interesting phenomena, but nowhere near the apocalyptic situation many are touting.

  4. #4
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2002
    Location: Sacramento, CA
    Oh, I'm not saying this is certainly true or anything. It probably isn't. First and foremost because cell phones have gradually penetrated society, and yet (if the numbers are right) 60% of west coast bees all suddenly die in one year. Cell phone use has continued to go up year by year but not to a "all of a sudden all bees die" level.

    Also, apparently this only affects domesticated honey bees - which, while very prevalent, means that the world population of bees is not in any danger (as far as we know).

    But yes, bees are the leading pollinators of flowering plants. So if bees were to disappear, it would be very very bad.

  5. #5
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2000
    Location: sup
    But then are domesticated honeybees the most prevalent type of bee?

    Playing devil's advocate here, but a) I don't know and b) I'm curious as to how dire this would be.

  6. #6
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2002
    Location: Sacramento, CA
    Quite possibly. Make no mistake, the death of them would be very very bad. Just probably not "all the food is gone and we're all gonna die" bad, more like "big food shortage" bad.

  7. #7
    Previously Important
    Registered: Nov 1999
    Location: Caer Weasel, Uelekevu
    My Apocalypsis doesn't revolve around bees, I tried to hint. My larger concern is the proliferation (and unavoidable presence) of MASSIVE amounts of EM in human (well, Western and vast swaths of Easern) society in general. And if this stuff is found to be evil in the cell-destroying way, then we've got a massive problem on our hands.

    I don't actually fear or really believe that sort of tinfoil, but I do give it some serious thought and a lot of whimsical thought.

    But yeah, as far as pollen and insect // plant ecosystems go, a Bee Apocalypse would be pretty goddamned dire as well.





    zombees lol

  8. #8
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2000
    Location: sup
    There's always those "I lived next to aerial tower and developed cancer/leukemia/inser disease here" stories to give you pause, GBM.

    As for dire apocalyptic situations, pffft, I'm only LIVING in one currently. 19% of water reserves left. lol?
    Last edited by Scots Taffer; 4th May 2007 at 01:14.

  9. #9
    Previously Important
    Registered: Nov 1999
    Location: Caer Weasel, Uelekevu
    Exactly. That's what I was saying about Gray.

    chimpanzbees

  10. #10
    Member
    Registered: Nov 1999
    Location: Who's asking?
    Food shortage for the fattest nation in the world may not be all that bad. I've got a keg that I need to turn in for a six pack.

  11. #11
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2003
    Location: Mossad Time Machine
    There wouldn't be a food shortage necessarily. Most cereal crops (corn, wheat, barley etc) are wind pollinated.

  12. #12
    BR796164
    Registered: Dec 2000
    Location: Bratislava, Slovakia
    I am watching this issue a bit. There are some suggestions that extinction of bees can be caused by specific parasite, but this doesn't explain why bees refuse to return back to the hive.

    http://www.latimes.com/news/la-sci-b...wed-storylevel

    In any case, it's a sad situation.

  13. #13
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2000
    Location: Utah
    Was you ever hit by a dead bee?

  14. #14
    BR796164
    Registered: Dec 2000
    Location: Bratislava, Slovakia
    Actually I was, a long time ago... she was just playing dead, smart little one. After that she was dead for sure. Such behavior makes no sense!
    Last edited by Rogue Keeper; 4th May 2007 at 05:55.

  15. #15
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2004
    Location: Back Home
    finally, we've found a way to combat the MASSIVE BEES

  16. #16
    Member
    Registered: May 2003
    Location: in the wabe

  17. #17
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2004
    Location: nor which
    I live in Nor Cal and a friend of mine has close to 50 supers - I think a super is just a white bee box(hive) stacked two or more high - beekeepers just call them supers and triples blah blah. For folks that have never seen the inside of a bee box, they look just like a CD case with slots that hold CD jewel cases. The bee box have slots that will hold the frames (wood frame with plastic hexagonal insert) where the bees deposit wax and honey. During the summer keepers will either pull honey loaded frames and drop fresh new frames into the super or just add another frame loaded super to the top of the hive. Keepers must do this or the bees will outgrow the bee box and swarm> this is how the wild bee population is replenished.

    Bee's are fascinating. In California during warm windless summer days the bees are so busy collecting pollen that they may stay out all night and not return to the hive to rest - they just catnap on a flower or leaf and then continue on working. Its funny, a dry northern wind ( relative to Chico, Ca.) really pisses off the bee's and they sting and harass the keepers (even after heavy smoking) but the same hive in the middle of a perfect day will ignore a keeper (no smoke) picking through the hive - even to the extent that the keepers are pulling loaded frames from a super, scraping the bees off the loaded frame with a putty knife or their gloved hands and then replacing the frames with clean new ones.

    Here on the US west coast the large apiary firms move bee boxes up and down the coast. Beekeepers might be in California during march for almond pollination and a few other orchard type crops then move the bees up to Oregon/Washington for cranberries and other vine type crops. This is where I have to wonder about EM waves killing our little bee friends, some of these crops exist in fairly remote places with low cell tower rates per square mile.

    > Certain crops really wear out the worker bees - I know when they work cranberries that the life spawn of the worker bees may drop by 30 percent or so.

    The bee industry has been fighting the bee mite for a few years now. Keepers make blocks of sugary- medicine infused food that looks like peanut butter and cuts like cheddar cheese. Keepers wire cut this stuff and drop it into the supers.

    Wild bee populations have been decimated by the bee mite and other natural causes which include a moth (brood moth?) that eats the wax(?) or honey(?) or attack the bee(?)


    PS: When the bee's are really active and happy they ignore the keepers picking through the supers - on days like this my buddy will be wearing shorts with only the beekeeper hood, he told me the bees get angry from warm human breath which can trigger the bees to sting but otherwise he can carefully pick through the hive and not get stung UNLESS - while pulling a frame he accidentally smashes a bee(s) that are working in between the frames.

    PSS: competent keepers will mark the top of the supers that have aggressive bees (sometimes a hive will just sound aggressive - certain pitch of buzzing) and come back later to pinch (kill) and replace the queens that spawn mean worker bees.
    Last edited by Trappin; 4th May 2007 at 14:46. Reason: Fixed for snarky smart ass internet users

  18. #18
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2004
    Location: Back Home
    Quote Originally Posted by Trappin View Post
    Bees are fascinating.
    Bees are fascinating.

  19. #19
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2003
    Location: Sandbar in the Gulf of Mexico
    Bees are on the what now?

  20. #20
    Moderator
    Registered: Dec 1999
    Location: Everywhere
    I suspect it's those new-fangled ear attachment things that are doing it. Not only do they make you look like a fucking idiot, they're OMG KILLING THE BEEES.

  21. #21
    Previously Important
    Registered: Nov 1999
    Location: Caer Weasel, Uelekevu
    but I look so cool.
    like LOBOT

    Also bees really are fascinating. The whole "Let me wiggle my bum around at you and you'll know exactly where I'm talking about" bit of communication still blows my mind.

  22. #22
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2004
    Location: Back Home

    slightly wayward expression incoming

    it blows my load

  23. #23
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2001
    Location: Scoville
    Quote Originally Posted by Gingerbread Man View Post
    "Let me wiggle my bum around at you and you'll know exactly where I'm talking about"
    Mad props to 'noid who pointed me to Jonathon Keats.

  24. #24
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: New Zealand
    Quote Originally Posted by Trappin View Post
    I live in Nor Cal and a friend of mine has close to 50 supers - I think a super is just a white bee box(hive) stacked two or more high - beekeepers just call them supers and triples blah blah.
    A super is the box which contains the frames. In summer months a hive will typically have from 4-6 supers, with an excluder (wire mesh with divisions small enough to allow workers through but not the queen) on the second or third box. Then the top supers will only have honey and no brood and vegetarians don't need to worry about eating hundreds of little baby bees with their toast.

    'Fascinating' bee story: when I moved up to Auckland I left one of my dad's empty hives sitting on the lawn. Wild bees moved in before I had a chance to move it so for six weeks until the bee gear arrived there was an active beehive within 5m of the front door.

    Fascinating addendum: don't ever wear blue when dealing with bees. Drives them mad.

  25. #25
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2002
    Location: Sacramento, CA
    Quote Originally Posted by Gingerbread Man View Post
    but I look so cool.
    like LOBOT
    I had a conversation with John Hollis (Lobot) once. Therefore I am infinitely cool.

    Also, I bought a new laptop today. Dell insisted I put the business name in the mailing address, so I had them ship it to Zombees Incorporated.

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