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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #51
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2006
    Location: The Heart of Empire.
    Hello all.
    I have just finished the last of the Flashman Papers that I had left to read, Flashman and the Angel of the Lord by George MacDonald Fraser. Very enjoyable if you like history and an ďAbsolute Bounder and cadĒ for a main character.

    Now I am reading The Last Bature by Kenneth C. Ryeland. Itís about a policeman in ex-colonial Africa in the 60s. Intrigue, spies and mad military governors, amongst other things. I am not too far in at the moment but itís off to a good start.

  2. #52
    SubJeff
    Guest
    I've read Flashman and The Dragon and lordy was it entertaining. Not sure about his historical facts though, not entirely at least. Ripping good yarn though.

  3. #53
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Quote Originally Posted by Muzman View Post
    I just finished "Surely You're Joking Mr. Feynman :The Adventures of a Curious Character". Feynman's about the most down-to-earth physicist you can imagine.
    I read this; it was fun. Much later I saw Matthew Broderick's movie Infinity and realized it's basically a dramatization of this book. If you liked the book then you should like the movie.

  4. #54
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2008
    Location: on a mission to civilize
    Quote Originally Posted by Stitch View Post
    Surely you can't be talking about John Irving. A Prayer for Owen Meany wasn't a masterpiece by any stretch but Irving is pretty solid writer.
    Nah, I was thinking of chick writers mostly.

    ...loved Garp, hated Meany--go figure.

  5. #55
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2004
    Location: namedrocalypse
    Dolores Claiborne - Stephen King

    finished it today ayuh

  6. #56
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2008
    Location: Ireland
    The potrait of the artist as a young man - James Joyce

    It gets really tiresome when he repeats the same old heaven/hell imagery over and over and over and over and over again.

  7. #57
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2000
    Location: best coast
    Isn't Joyce the one with the dirty love letters? Read those and I bet the heaven/hell imagery gets more amusing.

  8. #58
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2002
    Location: Edmonton
    Quote Originally Posted by Macha View Post
    The potrait of the artist as a young man - James Joyce

    It gets really tiresome when he repeats the same old heaven/hell imagery over and over and over and over and over again.
    Kinda, but that's sort of the point: it has a profound impact on the rest of his life.

  9. #59
    Member
    Registered: May 2009
    Location: Hurr Durr
    Neil Gaimans "American Gods", which I loved the first time, but I'm struggling a little at the moment.

  10. #60
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2001
    Location: LM's Dungeon
    I'm reading this thread.

  11. #61
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    Quote Originally Posted by Angel Dust View Post
    Currently starting Faulkner's The Sound And The Fury which is going to be my introduction to stream-of-consciousness. So far so good though.
    Bless your heart. That's a particularly dense word thicket to hack away at as an introduction. He isn't exactly known for concise what with page long run on sentences but the majority of that one is stream of conscious via cousin baby idiot. The end of a family line might be tragic but it comes off signifying nothing to me.

    I do recall enjoying his discription of honeysuckle arbors which were common for courting in this area but he only alluded to thier use which was annoying. Anyway, I would have suggested "The Reevers" if for nothing more than the mule description as a starting point. Plus I know his world intimately so when he mentions his Sunday liquor run I know he is going to Motee Daniels house and follow along in my minds eye. Okay, now I'm streaming it.

    Eh. The last thing I read was Clive Barkers "Weave World". I do not recommend it but it was forced on me with such insistence I could not say no and had to pick something good to say of it afterward. It did not make me want to burn my eyes out but I wish my friends had as excellent taste in literature as they do in friends.

    I'm reading "Breakfast of Champions" now because this thread reminded me I haven't.

  12. #62
    Member
    Registered: May 2009
    Location: Hurr Durr
    Kurt Vonnegut, now there's an American God

  13. #63
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: In my room
    Quote Originally Posted by Tocky View Post
    I wish my friends had as excellent taste in literature as they do in friends.
    How Wilde!

  14. #64
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2006
    Location: Gira
    Finished re-reading recently 'If At Faust you don't Succeed' by Roger Zelazny and Robert Sheckley. Now it's Stanislav Lem's "Memoirs Found in a Bathtub". I am half through the book and still having a hard time figuring what's the book is actually about. I love him and hate him for this.

  15. #65
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2006
    Location: Hamilton, New Zealand
    Quote Originally Posted by Tocky View Post
    Bless your heart. That's a particularly dense word thicket to hack away at as an introduction. He isn't exactly known for concise what with page long run on sentences but the majority of that one is stream of conscious via cousin baby idiot.
    I'm up to the third section now and I'm not finding the run on sentences too hard to follow, I don't try and understand every single thing, more just get the 'feeling'. The thing that can make it tricky is the complete lack of punctuation ie commas in some of those monster sentences. I quite enjoyed the passages from the point of few of the mentally handicapped man though.

  16. #66
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2008
    Location: Ireland
    Quote Originally Posted by Namdrol View Post
    Kurt Vonnegut, now there's an American God
    Good old Player Piano

  17. #67
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: 1, Rotation: 0
    Currently re-reading The Lord of the Rings for the umpteenth time, though for the first time in a translated version. Before that, I read Grey Souls by Philippe Claudel, whose main plot is about the murder of a little girl in a small French town during WW I. The story and the characters are sometimes a bit overdrawn, and at times Claudel tends to get a little self-indulgent in his own art des belles lettres. But it's by no means a bad book, as these issues are rather small, and I quite liked the ambiguous resolution of the murder mystery.

  18. #68
    BANNED
    Registered: May 2006
    Location: Italia
    My magnetic resonances to the brain X'D It seems that have no physical damages, luckily

    We have to celebrate

  19. #69
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: In my room
    I'm reading LOTR to my girl to put her to sleep, but that last part never works.

  20. #70
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Quote Originally Posted by Angel Dust View Post
    I'm up to the third section now and I'm not finding the run on sentences too hard to follow, I don't try and understand every single thing, more just get the 'feeling'. The thing that can make it tricky is the complete lack of punctuation ie commas in some of those monster sentences. I quite enjoyed the passages from the point of few of the mentally handicapped man though.
    It's worth looking at a timelined version to keep things straight
    http://www.usask.ca/english/faulkner/main/index.html

    What I liked about the first section was Benjy couldn't even speak coherently he was so mental, but his perspective and inner thoughts could be carefully described, almost as if there were another guy in there reporting on them on his behalf, saying "I", being honest to what Benjy is feeling, but still you wonder ... it's a fishy "point of view". But at the same time it's so interesting to have that such honest, inside access to a mind like that.

    The Quintin section was also interesting to me.
    Last edited by demagogue; 3rd Jun 2009 at 11:07.

  21. #71
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2006
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    Reading Lirael by Garth Nix, part two of the Old Kingdom trilogy. I read the first part in high school, it was called Sabriel and then I thought it was pretty mature for my high school library to have it. But anywho it's a pretty interesting novel set in technomagic steampunk world(similar to the setting of Arcanum) and the plot mainly involves the Abhorsen(people who use Death Magic to fight against necromancers and put the dead to rest using bells) and their enemies the necromancers. This part mostly concerns Lirael(a girl that comes from a group of clairvoyant people called.......the Clayr, duh) who's trying to find her destiny and Sameth(prince and son of Sabriel, an Abhorsen and heroine of the first book). Their stories sort of intertwine at the end and it gets pretty intense when Sam has to survive against the minions of the enemy necromancer using his limited knowledge of magic. For a fantasy book it's very nicely set out and has some great characters and isn't too focused on action.
    The next book I'll be reading is Neuromancer by William Gibson.

  22. #72
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2003
    Location: Purgatory
    For the moment I'm reading Faerie Tale by Raymond E. Feist. Mostly because my brother loves his stuff and keeps trying to convince me to give it another try (first one was Magician: Apprentice, just couldn't get into it).

    I have to say that I feel like a bit of a philistine looking at the books some of you are reading; my 'To read' stack is mostly comprised of fantasy/scifi fluff.

  23. #73

    I just received my copy of T.E. Lawrence's Seven Pillars of Wisdom, the complete 1922 Oxford text. I've been wanting to read it for years. w00t

  24. #74
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2007
    Location: Finger paintings of the insane

    I rarely read books I haven't read before...

    Kerouac-On the Road

    And a non-fiction training book, The Dog Whisperer by Jan Fennell


    Oh yeah, I just finished John Grisham's A Painted House. Damn good book.

  25. #75
    june gloom
    Guest
    I finished up Roadside Picnic finally. I think I'm going to start on Kim Robinson's Three California's triptych, which I've had for over a year and never actually read.

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