TTLG|Thief|Bioshock|System Shock|Deus Ex|Mobile
Page 37 of 203 FirstFirst ... 27121722273233343536373839404142475257626772778287137 ... LastLast
Results 901 to 925 of 5053

Thread: What have you watched lately?

  1. #901

  2. #902
    Moderator
    Registered: Dec 1999
    Location: Everywhere
    Millennium's demise made me so sad back in the day, but I lay the blame squarely at Chris Carter's feet. He started with a great premise, but had no fucking idea where he was going and it became increasingly clear that he didn't understand the mythology of the world he had built. Same problem with X-Files, and a tradition that continues to day with the shows it inspired (Lost, Heroes, etc.). I thought Writing 101 is "write the ending first." Frank Black was a great character though, and the Jose Chung episodes on both Millennium and X-Files were brilliant.
    Last edited by fett; 16th Aug 2010 at 16:47.

  3. #903
    Member
    Registered: May 2000
    Location: East Achewood, CA
    I'm just about done with the first season of Millennium myself, having interlaid it among the DVDs in my Netflix queue.

    Never saw it in the 90's, I was a teenager with friends and a car and a job then, and these were exciting, new things. I like it, but I'm dreading its lack of a satisfying end.

  4. #904
    Taking the Death Toll
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Location: ideally far away
    What did you think of Lamentation and Broken World? Those two episodes, IMO, define the first season more than any of the others.

  5. #905
    Member
    Registered: May 2000
    Location: East Achewood, CA
    I'm about one show away from Lamentation, I'll be sure to chime in once I see these two. Looking forward to it!

  6. #906
    is Best Pony
    Registered: Nov 2002
    Location: The magical land of Equestria
    After three years of having the collected Firefly unopened on my shelf I finally got around to watching the first episode on Sunday.

    Cue Thursday and I have gone through the entire series and just started the Big Damn Movie. Hot damn this stuff is good.

  7. #907
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2000
    Location: sup
    Firefly is a true great, look forward to revisiting someday.

    Tonight we watched Total Recall which my wife called "Inception without all the bullshit and half the budget".

    <3

  8. #908
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: I think I've been here
    IIRC Total Recall had the largest budget ever at the time. However at $65 million this was still less than half of Inception's budget ($160 million).

  9. #909
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2006
    Location: Washington DC
    I've been watching the Twilight Zone (the original). Some episodes are great, some are crap, but the part I find most interesting is how late-50s culture differs from today's as reflected in the show.

    I'm also going to start watching Mystery Science Theater 3000. The only one I ever saw was 'Santa Claus Conquers the Martians' and it was enjoyable enough.

    Edit: I was disappointed with Serenity. It seemed to drop the Western elements entirely as well as some of the drama and go the route of a sci-fi action adventure. Not a surprise given the transition from TV to film, but it downplayed some of the strengths of Firefly.

  10. #910
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2004
    Location: Israel
    I'm late by about... 10 years, but Gattaca is probably one of the best science fiction films I've seen.
    I also watched Moon, which was okay, I guess. The whole premise is kinda hard to swallow(I know, big corporations are evil, but when they provide 75% of the earth's energy surely they can afford to train more people in moon-base-operating instead of doing the whole clone business and risk losing it all. Seriously, you have one guy on the moon who delivers your product by space mail from a practically fully-automated base, the expenses are probably nothing compared with the profit you'll make by providing all that energy).
    Also, potential horrible plot hole detected: evil corporation is willing to kill Sam in order to keep the whole clone thing a secret, but when he goes to earth in the fuel container they just let him walk?

  11. #911
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Gattaca is a wonderful movie, even without the science fiction conceits. It's a well-written character story first and foremost.

    Moon's pretty contrived in spots, but making Kevin Spacey a robot was an inspired choice, I thought.

  12. #912
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2006
    Location: On the tip of your tongue.
    I watched Moon the other day and really enjoyed it. Yeah the plot was a tad illogical on paper, but it more than made up for that with a wonderfully tense and paranoid atmosphere and a brilliant performance from Sam Rockwell.

    And yeah Kevin Spacey was a great choice for the robot. Probably the only person who could not only get away with the sci-fi cliche of the "talking human-level-intelligence robot somehow possible in the very near future just so the audience can relate to them", but actually manage to subvert it and deliver a really fascinating character.

  13. #913
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2000
    Location: sup
    Gattacca is a beautiful film. I can't watch it too often (I own it on blu-ray) because it remains very vivid to me each and every time I see it, I need a couple of years distance between viewings.

  14. #914
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Speaking of scifi, I was wondering today if they're ever going to get around to making "Stranger in a Strange Land". It turns out it's more possible than I thought.

    Then I saw another possibility that made me happy as a git.

  15. #915
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2006
    Location: Washington DC
    What I find most interesting about Gattaca is how as time passes, its core theme is becoming more and more relevant. Not many films have that kind of vision and foresight.

  16. #916
    Member
    Registered: May 2001
    Location: Stir Crazy
    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Karne View Post
    Recently, yes circa in 1988-1992 (recently for sure, don't bitch), Treasure of silver lake (Der Schatz im Silbersee 1962), if I recall right the woman in the end is the devil and the gold is cursed.
    Run.


    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0056452/

    Ooops forgot that, I had that in mind but it slipped away some how.
    Gah is not that one either, the quest for the mystery movie continues.

  17. #917
    Member
    Registered: Jun 1999
    Location: Procrastination, Australia
    Quote Originally Posted by suliman View Post
    I also watched Moon, which was okay, I guess. The whole premise is kinda hard to swallow(I know, big corporations are evil, but when they provide 75% of the earth's energy surely they can afford to train more people in moon-base-operating instead of doing the whole clone business and risk losing it all. Seriously, you have one guy on the moon who delivers your product by space mail from a practically fully-automated base, the expenses are probably nothing compared with the profit you'll make by providing all that energy).
    Also, potential horrible plot hole detected: evil corporation is willing to kill Sam in order to keep the whole clone thing a secret, but when he goes to earth in the fuel container they just let him walk?
    Gattacca is a good watch but it was already pretty dated by the time it came out. No one really thinks DNA and DNA testing is ever going to work like that. You could look at it as an alegory for eugenics and the way humans obsess themselves with a certain scientific paradigm and take it to the extreme , but I took it as harder sci-fi than that and had trouble getting past it.

    Moon only suffers in those areas if you haven't been paying attention to corporate behaviour for the last twenty years. Don't take it the wrong way. Everyone sees apparently unbelievable things in stories which are perfectly plausable. You don't have to look far to find staggeringly wealthy corporations going through very odd contortions to make just a little bit more money. They have small armies of people looking for ways to do just that all the time
    It gets even easier when you consider that in a less than fuel rich world, flying back and forth to the moon in order to fix stuff or change staff all the time would be really really expensive (and you'd need to. 'Fully automated' stuff breaks down all the time and requires constant human monitoring. It's arguably more far fetched that they've got the system down to only needing one person to monitor it effectively).
    Although weird, if all the contigencies were possible I could very easily believe a corporation considering the method in the film.
    And the ending : It is a little cute, but I doubt who or whatever retrieves the H3 from the delivery rocket is fully prepared and equiped to murder any stray clones aboard. Maybe he ran away?
    Last edited by Muzman; 27th Aug 2010 at 04:08.

  18. #918
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    Also, I'd say that the corporation isn't what the film is about - it's much more about the "What if?" and the resulting issues of identity. What if you find out that you're a clone and your entire history is fake. Does that make you a fake? Does it mean that your emotions aren't real? Etc. While it helps to have a setup that is well thought out, giving the setup too much of a focus turns it into a very different film altogether. It's a bit like The Truman Show - the film isn't realistic when it comes to the TV show, but depicting the logistics and organisational details of what it would be like to create such a show is not what the film wants to be about all that much anyway.

  19. #919
    Member
    Registered: Jun 1999
    Location: Procrastination, Australia
    True, but a lot of complaints about Moon seem to stem from it being a pretty trope defiant film; We've all seen how conflicted AIs behave, we've all seen how mendacious corprorations behave etc. People often criticise it, indirectly, for not meeting those expectations.

    I do think a big part of its point is that you should be paying attention to smaller more subtle things than the big plotty aspects, so that is true. But I think the rest of it hangs together and is quite well thought out, if you subject it to something other than movie logic.
    (about the only thing I have a problem with is Gerty apparently having a live conversation with Earth. I like Gerty's a-typical movie AI behaviour, but that linkup still leaves the possibilty that Earth could have influenced the situation, or at least kept tabs on it at all times. And what of the signal blocking towers in that case too?. That's the only real plot hiccup for me)

  20. #920
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2001
    Location: Tatry Mountains, Poland
    The White Ribbon

    Masterpiece.

  21. #921
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2000
    Location: sup
    I saw Caché the other night and without the knowledge of Franco-Algerian relations, the movie was a bit abrupt and haltingly told, however armed with that understanding it became a very powerful metaphor on a number of levels which has a fair level of aggression in the charges it levies.

  22. #922
    Member
    Registered: Aug 1999
    Location: Lost in Quiddity
    Quote Originally Posted by Scots Taffer View Post
    I saw Caché the other night and without the knowledge of Franco-Algerian relations, the movie was a bit abrupt and haltingly told, however armed with that understanding it became a very powerful metaphor on a number of levels which has a fair level of aggression in the charges it levies.
    I think I saw a movie about this very same issue. It's called "The Battle of Algiers" and is shot in a kinda B&W documentary style. Something familiar about seeing a movie about a group of Algerian liberators who engage in acts of terrorism which then prompts the French military to use terror like tactics including torture.

    Haven't seen anything lately as I've been watching various anime DVDs but sitting next to me is "Never Cry Wolf".

  23. #923
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    The Battle of Algiers is one of the classic political/war movie of all time, and it had (they say) a large influence on film-making. For one thing, it depicted both sides rather neutrally, showing each sides' motivations without itself taking sides -- at least attempting to; one could debate if that's 100% possible -- showing sympathetic & atrocious aspects of both. And the style was memorable.

    I haven't heard or read about the movie Cache, but I imagine comparisons to The Battle of Algiers are inevitable... Like the way Platoon sets the standard for Vietnam movies.

  24. #924
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2007
    It was also famously screened in the Pentagon in late 2003, prompting comparisons between Algiers and Iraq (Hitchens wrote an argument against this line of thinking).

  25. #925
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    Quote Originally Posted by suliman View Post
    Also, potential horrible plot hole detected: evil corporation is willing to kill Sam in order to keep the whole clone thing a secret, but when he goes to earth in the fuel container they just let him walk?
    Late to this party but I would never have thought this group would miss the cynical. It doesn't matter if Sam lives when you have a Limbaugh clone (metaphoricaly but tell me it didn't sound libelously close) spinning a lie of the truth. Sure they could kill him but he's going to die soon anyway and they can rewrite history any way they please. Hell, they rewrite the present. The last you hear is them doing so. Facts don't matter.

Page 37 of 203 FirstFirst ... 27121722273233343536373839404142475257626772778287137 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •