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Thread: What are you kicking?

  1. #426
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    A game is late and over budget... news at eleven.

    As for the Kotick thing, a developer going over budget versus a publisher suing the devs over the rights to their game, yeah I'd be inclined to say that Kotick was the one who was being a prick in this case. Activision dropped the game, which was fine, they had their reasons, but then they went above and beyond that and tried to stop the game from being made, which is a dick move as far as I'm concerned.

    Spacebase, sure, not looking good, and the person responsible for the project has been fired, so probably not a lot of hope for it continuing to be developed.
    Last edited by Starker; 14th Jun 2015 at 18:41.

  2. #427
    PC Gamering Smartey Man
    I <3 consoles and gamepads

    Registered: Aug 2007
    Location: New Zealand
    Broken Age's Kickstarter received 833% funding and he still couldn't control the scope of it; $2 MILLION DOLLARS is over-budget is no laughing matter. The Kotick anecdote is proof that he has a HISTORY of doing just that. Stop being fanboy in denial and face the facts.

    I don't think game design is really Schafer's calling, he probably should be doing Adult Swim cartoons or graphic novels.

  3. #428
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by EvaUnit02 View Post
    Broken Age's Kickstarter received 833% funding and he still couldn't control the scope of it; $2 MILLION DOLLARS is over-budget is no laughing matter. The Kotick anecdote is proof that he has a HISTORY of doing just that. Stop being fanboy in denial and face the facts.

    I don't think game design is really Schafer's calling, he probably should be doing Adult Swim cartoons or graphic novels.
    First of all, 3.3 million was not the funding they had available for the game. Amazon took 5% of that and Kickstarter took a further 5%, plus there was the documentary and the money spent on fulfilling backer rewards, so the actual amount that they had for the game was more like 2 million.

    Secondly, 833% of the funding my ass -- the budget was whatever money they raised. Who says that the initial Kickstarter goal has to be the exact budget? Do you really think that they should've made a small game for 300k and pocketed the rest of the money?

    Thirdly, as I've shown, Brian Fargo did the exact same thing, going upwards of 3 million "over budget" in the process and I don't see you calling him out on that.

    And lastly, so what if they did go over the budget? They put in their own money and finished the game, with no skin off the backers. In fact, the backers got a bigger and more polished game out of it. A company adding millions of their own money to the KS budget to deliver a better game, well excuse me if I don't run around with a pitchfork.


    Oh, and that Kotick quote "proves" nothing. Game projects being late and going over budget is extremely common. That's just a reality of game development. If I'm a "fanboy" for calmly looking at the facts and not jumping to conclusions then so be it. Maybe you should stop twisting the facts, so that I don't have to correct you on them.
    Last edited by Starker; 15th Jun 2015 at 05:15.

  4. #429
    Member
    Registered: May 2000
    Location: North of the equator.
    Bobby Kotick may come off as a prick to the general public that doesn't know him personally... but, IMHO, he was spot on with Tim Schafer having a history of this sort of thing. But the real reason I posted a link to that article was not to prove that but to show a possible glimpse into Tim Schafer's character:

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby Kotick
    "The guy comes out and says I'm a prick,"

    "I've never met him in my life – I've never had anything to do with him. I never had any involvement in the Vivendi project that they were doing, Brütal Legend, other than I was in one meeting where the guys looked at it and said, 'He's late, he's missed every milestone, he's overspent the budget and it doesn't seem like a good game. We're going to cancel it."
    Whether this quote right here is true or not, it does say an awful lot me. That Tim Schafer might have been too quick to throw someone else under the bus before even accepting any blame. After all, why throw stones at the man on the top if you have never even met or talked to him? And being the popular opinion to throw stones at the man does not justify it or make it right.

    As for Activision/Vivendi trying to stop Brutal Legend from being made... whether it is a dick move or not entirely depends upon the details of the contract. Activision/Vivendi might have funded a little bit of the development of the game... if so... what was their money paying for? They weren't giving it to DoubleFine out of the goodness of their hearts or for charity obviously. Most developers literally sell the rights of all the original content made for the game being developed (models, textures, sound assets, etc.) to the publisher as part of the publishing agreement. If that is the case with Brutal Legend & old Tim tried to take that content to EA... then Activision/Vivendi may have had a solid case & then they would've had every right to take DoubleFine & EA to court. But without knowing the full details of the contract between DoubleFine & Activision/Vivendi... then I have to say that anybody jumping on either side without knowing the details is a complete & utter fool/idiot/moron.

    The way I see it, Tim Schafer is starting to develop the same exact problem that Peter Molyneux is know for... or rather... infamous for. Promising the world when you can't even deliver 10% of that or having absolutely no friggin' clue of just how much money all of your promises will cost. The difference between Brian Fargo going over budget & Tim Schafer is that Brian Fargo's current studio has yet to drop support for a project. I actually own Spacebase DF-9 & all support attempts to get it working have failed as the game still needs patching. Now hopefully with enough fan support it might get a few unofficial fan patches or mods to fix it up... but that should never ever be the case. If your studio is still open & running... you have an obligation to your customers... period. You should either patch the product up, offer full refunds to all customers &/or pull the defective product entirely from shelves. But DoubleFine unfortunately didn't do any of that. The game is still currently selling on steam... so they did absolutely nothing. Instead, DoubleFine would rather just cut their loses & run. And doing something like that says a hell of a lot about their business practices & that they never had any faith in their own product to begin with. It also damages whatever reputation Tim & his company may have had in the eyes of his customers. And let's be honest, most customers will also stop having any faith in any future products they deliver as a result.

    Honestly, I believe a lot of the flak aimmed at Tim Schafer & DoubleFine stems from this very game (Spacebase DF-9). Is that said flak justified though? Well unfortunately they (Tim & DoubleFine) haven't done anything of significance for the community to make that said flak they receive unjustified.

    In the end... I personally think that Tim Schafer is merely just the victim of his own overzealous nature. All this drama & crowd funding only proves... to the powers that be... that publishers, no matter how hated they are/were, did serve a significant purpose in AAA game development. To rein in on overzealous developers such as Peter Molyneux & the like. And for other indie-devs trying to make a break in this industry through crowd funding, this is not the message or example they want set. Because it could potentially close off crowd funding as source to make it in the industry.

    The only piece of advice I could even attempt to offer Tim & DoubleFine at this point would be... "Don't let your mouth write a check that your ass can't cash."
    Last edited by Nedan; 15th Jun 2015 at 06:11.

  5. #430
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Nedan View Post
    Whether this quote right here is true or not, it does say an awful lot me. That Tim Schafer might have been too quick to throw someone else under the bus before even accepting any blame. After all, why throw stones at the man on the top if you have never even met or talked to him? And being the popular opinion to throw stones at the man does not justify it or make it right.
    He didn't throw anyone under the bus. He just made an off the cuff remark that Kotick didn't have to be quite as dickish as he was, and he had ample reason for doing so, because Activision dropped the project without even telling Double Fine about it. If that isn't a dick move I don't know what is. Maybe try putting yourself in someone's shoes whose company's future depends on the whims of such a publisher.

    And Double Fine may have dropped the ball with Spacebase, but calling Schafer out for the things that you are willing to let slide for Fargo is hypocritical, as far as Broken Age is concerned.

    Edit: oh, and Activision didn't fund even a tiny bit of Brütal Legend. The deal was with Vivendi and Activision passed on getting the publishing rights when they merged with Vivendi. Only after EA picked the project up did they suddenly claim that they were still in negotiations with Double Fine about getting those rights, even though they hadn't even bothered to tell DF that they dropped the project previously. Not to mention that Bobby Kotick himself later confirmed that they had, in fact, dropped it.
    Last edited by Starker; 15th Jun 2015 at 09:09.

  6. #431
    Member
    Registered: May 2000
    Location: North of the equator.
    I'm going to have to ask you to prove your claim. Otherwise, I'm inclined to call BS. Here are the prominent sources I gathered from...

    Activision sues to stop Jack Black game
    Activision Sues To Stop Brutal Legend Release

    Both pretty much state that Double Fine was paid $15 million to develop Brutal Legend. Neither one is solid proof but DoubleFine has yet to offer anything to discredit that claim. The only shred that has been given, is that both parties involved decided to settle out of court with the details not being released. The only real details released was this interview from Bobby Kotick:

    Activision's Kotick on Brutal Legend drama: 'That's not really what happened'

    And no matter how you slice it, settling out of court can look both bad & good for both sides. Do take note... I did say earlier that they might have funded it. As no detailed evidence has ever been released to prove or disprove it other than an interview so I cannot be at all certain. But you seem to fully believe they did not fund anything. So if you have insider knowledge... then by all means... share it with us. Otherwise, I'm going to have to stick to my original comment & once again say that anybody jumping on either side (take note Einstein, that would include anyone defending Activision/Vivendi also by the way ) without knowing the details is a complete & utter fool/idiot/moron.

    As for your fetish with Brian Fargo, well personally I have yet to burned by his company. But both of them (yes, I said both Tim & Brian) shouldn't be allowed to write checks that their asses can't cash. But that really wasn't my point for posting about Tim & DoubleFine. My real point was to merely weigh in on the matter as objectively as I could possibly be. I, in fact, offered you the best piece of argument against people that throw flak at Tim Schafer & DoubleFine for Broken Age. Maybe you should re-read what I said in my last post.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nedan
    Honestly, I believe a lot of the flak aimmed at Tim Schafer & DoubleFine stems from this very game (Spacebase DF-9). Is that said flak justified though? Well unfortunately they (Tim & DoubleFine) haven't done anything of significance for the community to make that said flak they receive unjustified.
    Now that doesn't mean all of it is fully justified. But when a customer gets screwed over by a company... they usually b*tch & moan about it as is their right. But a lot of flak directed at DoubleFine seemed to pick up speed shortly after the Spacebase DF-9 debacle... at least from what I could see. Personally, after spending money on Spacebase DF-9, I won't be spending any more money on any DoubleFine Early-Access title again. But that is neither here nor there concerning Broken Age... at least IMO.

  7. #432
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    One of the articles that you posted proves that Activision didn't fund the project. I've highlighted the relevant part below. But the salient point here is that Activision claimed they were still in negotiations with DF to try to stop Brütal Legend from being released. If they really were after the money Vivendi invested in it, they would have just asked for compensation. But that wasn't what they did. Instead, they tried to stop the release, which would have destroyed DF. So they were being unnecessarily dicks about it.

    And if Activision had a leg to stand on, do you really think they would have settled out of court for a fraction of the Vivendi money?

    "Vivendi had advanced him like 15 or 20 million dollars," Kotick explained. "He missed all the milestones, missed all the deadlines, as Tim has a reputation of doing." As the massive merger between Activision and Vivendi wore on, Kotick said he had very little on-the-ground knowledge of Brutal Legend.

    "I don't know if it was a decision not to publish it. I don't even really know where we were in the negotiation and discussions about what was going to happen to the product. Unbeknownst to everybody, they didn't have the rights to sell. So all we'd said is, 'Look: If you go and do a deal with somebody else, pay back the money that was advanced to you.' That was all we were looking for. We ultimately got a fraction of the money that had been advanced to him, and as far as I know, that was the end of it. But I don't even know if there was a lawsuit from my recollection."
    Of course, you got to keep in mind that it is Kotick trying to whitewash the incident and make them look good. "Oh, I don't even know whether we were in the negotiations." "I don't know if there was a lawsuit." You're the damn CEO of the company. It's your job to know these things.


    Quote Originally Posted by Nedan View Post
    But a lot of flak directed at DoubleFine seemed to pick up speed shortly after the Spacebase DF-9 debacle... at least from what I could see.
    Nah, the accusations that Schafer is a "scammer" and that "Kotick was right" were thrown out long before Spacebase was even a thing. You should have seen the articles, comments and forum threads when it was announced that Broken Age would be delivered in two acts. And people are mostly still going on about Broken Age, as you can see from what EvaUnit posted. In comparison, Spacebase received much less media coverage and discussion. If it wasn't for all the Broken Age drama, it would have barely made headlines. Which is a shame, because as far as Spacebase is concerned, it would be deserved, from what I can tell.
    Last edited by Starker; 15th Jun 2015 at 17:17.

  8. #433
    Member
    Registered: May 2000
    Location: North of the equator.
    I think I need to wash my eyes. I can't believe another human can read that sentence & miss everything said entirely. Do you even understand what Kotick said with that quote? Reread it again.

    That entire paragraph clearly says he was advanced $15 to $20 million. When DoubleFine went to EA, they then threatened legal action to get back the money they invested (the same $15 to $20 million). They were able to recoup some of their loss but not all.

    What that tells me clearly is that they did fund part of Brutal Legend in the beginning. That they were in the right to initially threaten taking DoubleFine to court.

    As for your question about why they settled... are you even reading anything I'm writing? I said that can look bad for both sides... but let me clarify on that. With a big corporate entity like Activision/Vivendi, the bottom line is money. Nothing else matters at all. A long dragged out court case would mean losing lots more money. So settling is always preferred. When dealing with a small company like DoubleFine, they may be aware that Tim & Co. may have almost no money left to actually pay back the advancement & a full blown lawsuit would probably mean that they would never see any of their money returned at all. So they may have agreed to a percentage of the profits to at least recoup some of the money. But without knowing the details of the settlement, this is all conjecture.

    Another thing that is made clear by that last article is that DoubleFine's initial deal was with Vivendi before their merger. Not with Activision or Bobby Kotick at all. So that also lends credence to Kotick stating that he had no knowledge of the deal DoubleFine had with Vivendi except for one meeting he merely sat in on at the end. So for Tim to basically throw Kotick under the bus seems extremely rude. That is also why I said that he might have been too quick to throw someone else under the bus before even accepting any blame.

    You see, I have no real issue with DoubleFine other than Spacebase DF-9. I have absolutely no intentions of trusting them on Early-Access ever again as they were willing to toss me & everyone else who bought the game out of faith under the bus as it were. To me, it says they will be willing to do it again & that they don't really care what their fans think.

    The sad part is that DoubleFine may never be able to go back to kickstarter due to the way they handled Spacebase DF-9 in my eyes as kickstarter is based on trust. Sure they were able to get their original kickstarter finished... but that was at the cost of another project of theirs & destroying the faith that was invested in that one. With Brian Fargo, I don't cast stones in his direction or even call him out on his short comings with mismanagement because basically I still have faith in him & his company.

    Another thing to keep in mind is that one of the reasons people toss a lot of flak at Tim Schafer & DoubleFine is that Broken Age is the first kickstarter of its type. No big named studio ever attempted to try crowd funding a possible Triple A title before on such a large scale. Being the first in line is not always the best as you're going to upset a lot of people along the way & that every small error made will be turned into a mountain. Tim should have been well aware of this but he still proceeded with the crowd funding. That is also another reason why Tim & DoubleFine get called out on mistakes as they were setting the precedent for crowd funding & yet the other developers were merely following suit. Now that doesn't justify all of the flak, but you have to take each complaint with a grain of salt.

  9. #434
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Nedan View Post
    Another thing that is made clear by that last article is that DoubleFine's initial deal was with Vivendi before their merger. Not with Activision or Bobby Kotick at all.
    That was my entire point. This wasn't Activision's project to begin with. And it is pretty clear from the later statements that they did drop it, contrary to what they claimed at the time.

    Also, you're not looking at this from Schafer's perspective at all. When Double Fine's future was in the line after Vivendi had stopped giving them payments, Activision then dropped the project without bothering even telling Double Fine. DF then managed to find someone else to pick it up only for Activision to c*ckblock them. That is a dick move any way you look at it. If Activision really was just after the Vivendi investment, why did they try to stop the game from being published? They didn't have to do that, especially at the cost of ruining another company. And they didn't just threaten to take DF to court, they sued them. Only after the judge ruled that they wouldn't delay the game from being published did they settle out of court.

    Also, note that I'm not defending Spacebase in any shape or form. I'm only talking about Broken Age and the way people misrepresent it.

    Also also, in your character assassination you neglect to mention that Schafer's remarks were made at a time that he believed wasn't a part of the interview and that he later apologised for those remarks. Instead, you try to make it out as if Schafer was deliberately trying to put all blame on Kotick, and that it wasn't just something he said out of frustration following a very stressful time.
    Last edited by Starker; 15th Jun 2015 at 19:18.

  10. #435
    Member
    Registered: May 2000
    Location: North of the equator.
    Activision, according to Bobby Kotick, had little involvement in Brutal Legend. But Vivendi did have a stake in it & wasn't about to let the money go quietly. And since they were still in the beginings of the merger, I don't believe Kotick had any real say on the matter. But this is all still conjecture.

    Let me put it in another way from a personal stand point... If I invest money in a product to have it made, regardless of whether it gets completed or not, I own part of that product based upon the money I invested. And if I found out that the developer took the product to a competitor, I would also naturally sue his unrighteous arse & his tiny company into the ground for eternity...



    ...unless compensated in some way.



    That is not a dick move... that is just simple business. Covering your assets & protecting all of your investments is simple business tactics 101. So what Activision/Vivendi merely did was what any company would've done if put in the same situation.

    But on the flip side of that coin, what Tim Schafer & DoubleFine did... would also be what any small company would've done to protect their employees.

    The only real dick-ish thing done throughout this whole affair was the mud slinging. While Kotick's remarks came across as incredibly mature IMHO. Tim's comments came across as totally juvenile & extremely immature to me. And I unfortunately have very little tolerance for that sort of behavior from any company. If you're going to do that, you are in the wrong line of work... period. We already have enough blasted idiots like Cliff Bleszinski & Derek Smart as it is without adding to that pile.

    Also, with Tim Schafer's remark, I was aware that he tried or attempted to apologize. I say tried because it came across as extremely half-hearted & very disingenuous... as if he was more disappointed with the fact that he got caught saying it. Why would the remark not being believed to be a part of the interview matter in the slightest? If you said it... own up to it & apologize. Don't offer up excuses & don't compare the guy, that you just insulted, to Darth Vader while you are trying to apologize. It looks extremely bad & is in very poor taste.

  11. #436
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Just because a company can do something doesn't mean that they should do it. Otherwise, I could claim that DF was right in stopping the support and development of Spacebase, because that's just what businesses do, right? If a game doesn't sell, from a business standpoint it's best to cut your losses and stop throwing good money after bad. But that doesn't mean it's the right thing to do from a moral standpoint.

    Yes, companies exist to make money, but so what? So do drug cartels. The pursuit of money is not some inherently noble effort that should be respected. In the case of Activision, we have the business interests of one company on one hand, but on the other hand we have the fate of another company and its employees.

    And as we saw, it wasn't just about the money. If it was just about the money, they would've settled with asking for compensation, but they went all out and forced DF to countersue them which resulted in them walking away with nothing.

    Edit: Also, it would have made little sense for them to try to stop DF from getting the money from Brütal Legend, because then DF would have had the money to pay them without going bankrupt.
    Last edited by Starker; 15th Jun 2015 at 21:45.

  12. #437
    Member
    Registered: May 2000
    Location: North of the equator.
    As far as it not being the right thing to do from a moral standpoint, that's might be very true. But in the corporate world, that moral choice gets harder to follow as you move up. As a big company like Activision/Vivendi, the corporate heads have a duty to protect the interest of their investors. If they don't, their jobs are on the line. When you take the time to actually invest your own hard earned money into a company, you only really care about your own money & how it is used. So Activision/Vivendi didn't have a choice in the matter as they have to show to their investor's that they are protecting their investment.

    So unfortunately, even if it may appear to be a dick move to little guys like you, me or DoubleFine... that is just simply business.

    But for little studios like DoubleFine, they actually have more wiggle room. They don't, for the most part, have to worry about investor's & can make more decisions based on a good moral standpoint. From a corporate standpoint, it was the right decision to cut all support to Spacebase DF-9 & move on. After all, investor's interest is more important than public opinion in the long run. But DoubleFine isn't a huge corporation & public opinion for a little company can make or break it. So DoubleFine, as a small developer, does have a responsibility to their public & the public opinion.

    Also, corporate companies can afford a loss on one or two games a year as they release tons of games all across the board from different developers to different platforms. So they can easily try to recover some of their loss from other projects. Smaller studios like DoubleFine don't have the luxury of accepting a loss on even one game as they don't release that many titles a year to begin with.

    And when it comes to recovering an investment from a rogue developer, most corporations don't have the luxury of simply talking it out as they have a team of lawyers that are responsible for that & will often act first on the investor's behalf. Most business tactics often start with filing a lawsuit just to get their attention so that they know you mean business. Filing a counter-suit isn't all that uncommon either for smaller companies as they also need some protection.

    This. Is. Normal.

    Most of the time, this is what happens in the normal business world just to get a settlement as both parties involved rarely want to drag it out in court. As such is the case, both DoubleFine & Activision/Vivendi settled all matters pertaining to this out of court. And according to Bobby Kotick in that interview, they did in fact recover a small fraction of their initial investment DoubleFine.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby Kotick
    Unbeknownst to everybody, they didn't have the rights to sell. So all we'd said is, 'Look: If you go and do a deal with somebody else, pay back the money that was advanced to you.' That was all we were looking for. We ultimately got a fraction of the money that had been advanced to him, and as far as I know, that was the end of it.
    That quote tells me that DoubleFine didn't have any legal right to take the game to EA (at least according to Kotick's statement, so still conjecture). But instead of continuing with a full blown lawsuit over the rights to the game, Activision/Vivendi merely wanted their advancement paid back & nothing more.

  13. #438
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Once more, if Activision merely wanted Vivendi's investment, why try to bankrupt DF? Wouldn't it make more sense to keep the company solvent? And they tried until the very end, until the judge said he would not stop the release. The issue here is not that they tried to recoup the Vivendi investment, the issue here is that they tried to sink the project and DF along with it.

    And the issue with the rights was not as clear cut as Kotick claims. If they really did have the publishing rights they would have easily won the case. Even the judge said that he might rule in favour of DF.

    Here's what DF claimed in the countersuit (the sourced websites seem to sometimes give a 404 for some reason, but a refresh seems to fix that):
    http://www.nbcnews.com/id/32089430/n...science-games/

    Double Fine's countersuit seeks a judge's ruling that Activision actually terminated its agreement and that the company was free to sell it to EA.

    [...]

    Double Fine's lawsuit states that delays in the game's development were caused by the casting of top-notch voice talent to accompany Black's vocals, and to expand its single-player mode. Those changes were requested by Vivendi Universal Games, according to the lawsuit.
    And here's what the judge said:
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/32239683...science-games/

    Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Craig Karlan said during a brief hearing that his tentative ruling was to deny a motion by gaming giant Activision to delay the game's October release. He rescheduled arguments on the motion until Aug. 6 because his court calendar was full and to allow attorneys to fully argue their positions.

    [...]

    He told attorneys for Activision that he had several reasons why he was leaning against ordering the release of the game delayed, one of them being he wasn't sure they would win.

    "I can't say there's a likelihood of success here," he said.

    The judge, however, said it didn't appear that either side had an upper hand in the case.

    "This is going to be a close call," Karlan said.

  14. #439
    Member
    Registered: May 2000
    Location: North of the equator.
    Yeah... and he also said that it didn't appear that either side had an upper hand in the case & that it was going to be a close call. That means it would've dragged out for a long time in courts. Both sides would've lost a lot of money in legal fees & DoubleFine would've probably ended up going under as a result. And we come full circle back to my original point that this is normal corporate tactics in terms of investments & forcing your opponent to settle. Why does it seem like you have no idea how the corporate business world works?

    But more to the point... all of this is still conjecture.

  15. #440
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Well excuse me if I find normal corporate tactics of ruining the lives of a sizable number of people to be a bit on the side of dickish.

    Edit: Actually, I've said enough on this topic. I have better things to do.
    Last edited by Starker; 16th Jun 2015 at 05:16.

  16. #441
    PC Gamering Smartey Man
    I <3 consoles and gamepads

    Registered: Aug 2007
    Location: New Zealand
    Shenmue 3 raised $6.3+ million making it the most funded game ever on Kickstarter, beating Bloodstained's previous record of $5.5+ million. <3

    Now we wait for Sega to come to the party with remasters of Shenmue 1 & 2. I will be all over that if it drops on Steam, especially Shen 1 which was sadly never ported to oXbox. Watching a glorified Let's Play in DVD movie form isn't the same.
    Last edited by EvaUnit02; 19th Jul 2015 at 02:07.

  17. #442
    Are you sure? Shenmue 3's own stretch goals list marks the $8.8M level as "new kickstarter record, games category".

  18. #443
    PC Gamering Smartey Man
    I <3 consoles and gamepads

    Registered: Aug 2007
    Location: New Zealand
    Quote Originally Posted by Shadowcat View Post
    Are you sure?
    Yes.
    http://lmgtfy.com/?q=most+funded+video+game+kickstarter

  19. #444
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    After the sad failure of the 7th Guest 3 on kickstarter last year, a new kickstarter by fans of the series who had been developing their own free project have received support from Trilobyte the makers of 7th Guest and The 11th Hour to turn it into a fully fledged commercial game.

    This ones got my support.

  20. #445
    PC Gamering Smartey Man
    I <3 consoles and gamepads

    Registered: Aug 2007
    Location: New Zealand
    I've backed Battle Chasers: Nightwar. It's a JRPG from the makers of Darksiders 1 & 2, based upon a cult comic series written by the studio head Joe Madureira.


  21. #446
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    That looks awesome. Definitely backing that.

  22. #447
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    And the Battletech kickstarter by Harebrained Schemes is now up.

    As a huge fan of Mechwarrior 1 & 2, this one has my interest + universe is quite fascinating.

    As I'm watching it the game looks VERY LIKELY to hit it's goal within the next few minutes. 203k already with a target of 250k.

    The video makes this game sound awesome as a fan of the series.
    Last edited by icemann; 29th Sep 2015 at 13:37.

  23. #448
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Hmm. No campaign until $1m, no PVP until 2.5m. Not sure HBS can pull $2.5m, which is a shame.

  24. #449
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    lol. Have you not watched any of their Shadowrun kickstarters? They've hit every single stretch goal on all of the kickstarters they've done for that game. Unsure of how far up the goals Golem Arcana went, though I know it went well.

    Harebrained has a very good reputation for delivering what they promise (unlike many other kickstarter funded companies out there).

    Now many hours after my last post, but their already up to 767K. Their going to hit the 1 million mark easily. Be in the next day or so at most I'd bet.

  25. #450
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Kickstarters seem to have slowed down a bit in general, but they'll probably make it to at least 2 million, as they seem to be going at a similar rate to Divinity: Original Sin 2. The quality of Dragonfall and, as I hear, Hong Kong definitely helps here. People like the perception of backing a sure thing. From now on, it all depends on what kind of coverage they can get.

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