TTLG|Thief|Bioshock|System Shock|Deus Ex|Mobile
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 29

Thread: Any coffee aficianados here, or Nespresso users?

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Land of the crazy

    Any coffee aficianados here, or Nespresso users?

    Like most Americans, I was raised on brewed coffee, and when I was younger I used to grind my own and use a French press or percolator. I've had my share of coffee from automatic drip machines using paper filters and it's rarely better than just OK.

    In order to speed up the process of getting caffeine into my body in the morning, I abandoned my French press and bought a Keurig capsule machine about 5 years ago. The water pump just failed. Part of the Keurig appeal was being able to quickly brew tea and hot cocoa and make a whole carafe at a time when we host a larger family gathering. It was delightfully fast and low maintenance, but I really never liked any coffee or tea it produced so I'm not going down that route again.

    I've never been a coffee snob, but I do enjoy a double espresso or macchiato and sometimes iced latte. So I'm looking for an automatic espresso machine this time. I'm posting this on TTLG because we have a diverse crowd here. These coffee makers are not common in US homes.

    There seems to be two categories. First are the all-grinding, all-frothing, fully automated espresso machines. Second are the pod/capsule-based Nespresso machines. The former are significantly more expensive, but promise a much lower cost per cup. Nespresso is the opposite. As far as taste goes, I have no idea, I've never had a cup from a Nespresso machine. I assume that a Nespresso machine + frother would also be easier to maintain with less cleaning effort, but I don't really know.

    And if I go with Nespresso, the next question is, which one? There seems to be a dizzying variety of machines to research. First there is the original line vs. Vertuo line. I see the patents ran out on the former, so there is an open market for the pods, whereas Nestle owns the market for the Vertuo pods. But Vertuo can draw a long cup, which may be more to my guests' liking. There are several manufacturers. De'Longhi, Krups, Breville, and Magimix seem to be the big ones. And within each line there are multiple models which seem barely different in terms of features. A few expensive models have an automatic milk frother & dispenser built into the machine, but otherwise the only feature differences seem to be the size of the water tank or capsule container. Do they all perform the same when it comes to making coffee?

    And if I don't go with Nespresso, the what should I be looking for?

  2. #2
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2001
    Location: uk
    I rarely make coffee for more than just me at home and I have a tiny kitchen so I've got a cafetiere and a small stovetop espresso machine.

    Due to the recent reduction in the number of people in the office at any particular time and a general reluctance for people to carry pots of coffee around we've switched from our percolator to a fairly inexpensive small bean to cup, this one https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B001EOMZ..._ZJBKEbP8T59TV

    It's reasonably sensibly adjustable and whilst it's not quite set to my taste and it certainly doesn't get fed the sort of beans I use at home (but I'm not paying for them so they're decent enough) it makes a pretty respectable cup of coffee at a reasonable price. Whilst it's the neediest thing I've ever seen, constantly demanding to be emptied or filled, cleaning is actually very low effort and it's coping with several addicts using it all day five days a week.

    Capsule machines are stupid expensive to run and make the coffee that they'll sell you capsules for, not the coffee that you want.

    If being able to make tea with it is a concern then you need to better train your tea drinkers to understand their place in the world

  3. #3
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2001
    Capsule machines are stupid expensive to run and make the coffee that they'll sell you capsules for, not the coffee that you want.
    I'm with caffeinatedzombeh on this one. I love good coffee and no coffee machine in the world has ever served me one. I buy beans + use a small grinder, and for brewing I use either French press, stove-top moka pot, or cezve (Turkish coffee style brewing). IMO the last one makes the best coffee, although it's requires very slow brewing, so it's better for weekends or lazy mornings.

  4. #4
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2002
    Location: Edmonton
    Nespressos are fine, not great, but good when you want a quick cup of coffee. We had one for years before I realized that you can actually set the length of the shot, so any machine can do as long of a shot as you want. I only ever make Americanos with ours. Speaking of different machines, they’re all more or less the same, and the mechanical parts *are* the same, so get whichever one you think looks nicest.

  5. #5
    Administrator
    Registered: Oct 2000
    Location: Athens of the North
    It's always a bit dubious to argue coffee against someone whose username contains the word "caffeinated" but I quite like our Nespresso machine. It's never going be quite as "pure" as real coffee but it does the job and is a heck of lot better than instant. The biggest advantage for us is that it's easy to switch from a dark roast to a light one on a per-cup basis which allows both my wife and I to enjoy a cup of reasonable coffee without compromise.

  6. #6
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    I don't know, I like my coffee from a drip coffee maker just fine. I do use an A-list brand of ground coffee, but then it's good enough for me. People who come over never complain either.

    In the Netherlands we also have this popular coffee maker called Senseo for which you can buy pads that easily and quickly produce a cup of coffee. It's convenient for sure, but opinions vary on whether that's good coffee. Personally I'll drink it without complaining if it's offered to me but I'm not a fan and would never buy such a machine for my own home. Nor would I ever make instant coffee for myself. But drip coffee makers with paper filters and a good brand of coffee suits me perfectly fine, I don't need anything fancier than that.

  7. #7
    Still Subjective
    Registered: Dec 1999
    Location: Idiocy will never die
    Ground coffee in a French press.

    I've tried all these machines. They're okay, but never as good as ground coffee in a French press.

  8. #8
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2002
    Location: Edmonton
    The thing about French press coffee is that it's really oily, and for me it's more likely to cause a stomachache. I prefer paper filters, be it pourovers or a drip machine.

    I used to work as a barista for a fancy coffee shop, and before I quit I managed to get a nice grinder with my staff discount and a really nice drip machine (a Technivorm) for free, basically built out of the leftover parts of units brought in for repair. The Technivorm is the best, most convenient way to make good coffee, but if it's a lazy day and I have time, I'll make myself a pourover. I'm no longer the coffee snob that my old job used to require me to be, and I tend to make my coffee a lot weaker than the recommended dosages, around 30g/litre, as opposed to the prescribed 60. That way I can drink three or four cups before my body starts to shake.

  9. #9
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    Quote Originally Posted by Aja View Post
    (a Technivorm)
    LOL, my parents have one of those. They had one, then it broke after many years, and they bought another one (newer model I think).

    This is the exact one they have.

  10. #10
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    These discussions make me wish I liked coffee just so I could be picky about it. It's hard to be all snooty about diet coke. (Okay, let me be a little snooty: if it's been sitting in your garage for more than a month or so, it's expired; normal soda takes a long time to spoil but the aspartame in diet coke is a methylated dipeptide protein and doesn't keep well at all.)

  11. #11
    Still Subjective
    Registered: Dec 1999
    Location: Idiocy will never die
    Yeah, but what about Coke Zero, hmmm?

  12. #12
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004

  13. #13
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    Here is a segment from the CBC about a new way to make better espresso with less coffee and a more consistent result...

    ...USING SCIENCE!!


    We have a hybrid machine like this. The base the mug is on is removable for travel mugs.



    But we have reusable coffee baskets instead of the disposable ones. I had to drill out the lids because the hot water needle is extra long but it works fine for fresh singles.
    Last edited by Nicker; 1st Aug 2020 at 21:16.

  14. #14
    LittleFlower
    Registered: Jul 2001
    Location: Netherlands
    I have a Nespresso Pixie machine.
    I am absolutely not a "coffee snob".

    8 Years ago I bought a Nespresso Pixie machine, made by Krups. (I was forced into doing that. ) Since then I drink 1 or 2 lattes every morning. I used to drink tea. But making a latte is even easier. In my last job, I bought a Nespresso Magimix for the office, that was used by 5-10 colleagues of mine. TBH, I don't think there's much difference between the Pixie and the Magimix.

    At first I used to buy official cups only. It's a pain, because nowadays they only get delivered by mail. They have their own package-delivery. Which half the time can't find my house. Or doesn't come at the promised times. When I had my last job, there was a Nespresso shop close to where we used to eat lunch. So during those years, I did buy the official cups. Nowadays I buy fake cups in the supermarket. Every supermarket in NL has their own brand of fake cups for Nespresso machines. As a non-coffee-snob, even I notice the difference between the official cups and the fake ones. The official cups do taste a lot better. A lot. And there is a lot of variety. But the fake ones are acceptable, so I buy those now, because it's easier. If I ever get close to a Nespresso shop, I'll probably buy another 3 months supply.

    So my advice: buy a Nespresso machine. Try it. They are not cheap, but not really expensive. (A good real espresso machine, like used in a café, can cost thousands of euros). The machines are easy to use. Easy to keep clean. The quality of the coffee is steps above coffee from any coffee-drip-machine, imho. And there is lots of variety in cups. I wouldn't buy a Vertuo. I think those are just another trick by Nestlé to force customers to buy their cups. I don't believe there's any quality-improvement. And you can configure the size of a drink (length of time that water is being pressed through a cup), if you like larger (but slightly weaker) drinks.
    Last edited by Gryzemuis; 3rd Aug 2020 at 07:35.

  15. #15
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2006
    Location: Washington DC
    It's not as quick as any of the all-in-one devices, but my wife introduced me to pour-over coffee and it's pretty easy. We keep a scale, a grinder, the ceramic pour-over funnels, and a gooseneck electric kettle on the countertop. Fill the kettle, turn it on, and it heats up to a preset 205F (~38C). Weigh the appropriate amount of coffee beans, dump in the grinder. Put a filter in the funnel and set it over the coffee mug, dump the grounds in. When the water reaches temperature, pour it over the grounds, and when you're done just remove and throw out the filter. Simple, no cleaning required.

    I never was a coffee snob, but going from frozen grounds and a coffeemaker to freshly ground and pour-over really makes a big difference. There's a sweetness and slightly oily body to freshly ground coffee that you don't get from the capsules, and using water that isn't quite boiling avoids the bitterness that drip coffeemakers normally have.

    YMMV depending on how much effort you're looking to save. I tend to find that the more work a kitchen appliance does for you, the more maintenance and cleaning it requires. There's an enormous Miele at my workplace that, at the push of a button, measures a quantity of beans from an internal reservoir, grinds it fresh, and then boils and pumps water through it for a good cup of espresso in seconds. Problem is, nobody wants to follow the complex sequence to clean it, so every few months I open it up and find that damp remnants of coffee grounds have gone moldy, and the whole thing needs to be sanitized and scrubbed out. The capsule-based machines avoid most of that, but then you're beholden to buying the capsules, and IMO they don't compare to fresh.

  16. #16
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    I'm by no means a coffee connoisseur, but I do like a nice coffee. I got myself a Nespresso machine about two years ago and I'm happy with it. The range of available capsules is pretty broad, added to which it's extremely easy in Switzerland to recycle capsules (the postal service picks up bags of capsules you put in your mailbox). It's quick and easy and the quality of the coffee is decent enough for my tastes. I've switched to drinking more espresso and less coffee with milk, and I've found a bunch of blends that I enjoy drinking. The only negative is that due to COVID-19 and us working from home for months, I've been drinking about twice as much coffee as I used to - which was the main reason why I didn't buy a machine earlier: I was afraid that my coffee intake would increase considerable. Ah well.

  17. #17
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    I got one of these bean-to-cup machines a couple years back:



    It's a Melitta Caffeo Solo, not sure if they're sold outside of Europe. Anyway, I'm not a coffee snob or anything, I was mainly attracted to the ease of use and speed with this thing. Living by myself, making a pot of coffee usually takes too long AND it's difficult to make just 1 cup so a bit usually goes to waste. With this, it's a bit of whirring and grounding and I have a cup in a couple min. At 300€ it's pricier than a coffee maker, but I don't mind spending on a device I'll be using at least a couple times per day.

  18. #18
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Land of the crazy
    Thanks for all the replies.

    The type of machine caffeinatedzombeh and henke suggested is exactly what I was looking for as an alternative to Nespresso. They're more expensive up front, but I'd save A LOT on the coffee. When I lived in Sydney, we had one of those machines in each kitchen area at work. Like caffeinatedzombeh said, they did seem very needy, which is not what I want, but they had a lot more users at work. At home, it will just be my wife and I most days, so it might be low maintenance enough. I've been spoiled by the Keurig machine, because even though it doesn't make good coffee, it is fantastically low effort and fast. That's what piqued my interested about Nespresso.

    Aja's comment about the French press making oily coffee is exactly why I like it and why I don't care as much for paper-filter drip machines. And ironically, strong coffee doesn't bother my stomach, but drinking tea on an empty stomach will leave me lurched over and cramped.

  19. #19
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2019
    Location: Restaurant at end of universe
    I have a cheap knock off of Keurig machine that does the same thing - I've had my Farberware machine for at least 5 years. Mine came with a screen door mesh basket that i can just dump coffee in from any type of coffee i want to put in it. I don't buy the k cups because they major source of landfill garbage right next to plastic water bottles. I use can coffee + it's cheaper than the cups. I use it to heat water for tea if want that instead.

    I thought guys from Australia only drank beer that was the size of car engine oil cans and ate Vegemite sandwiches all day. I never would have guessed coffee too.

  20. #20
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: I think I've been here
    Quote Originally Posted by catbarf View Post
    it heats up to a preset 205F (~38C). [...] using water that isn't quite boiling avoids the bitterness that drip coffeemakers normally have.
    I'm surprised your barely above body temperature coffee has any taste at all.

    I'm using freshly ground Arabica in a paper filter in a ceramic funnel. On the weekends a stovetop. Pads and pods are an environmental sin that isn't justified by it's taste or cost.

  21. #21
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    205F == approximately 96C, not 38.

  22. #22
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: I think I've been here
    Ah right. I should have looked that up myself, but in a thread about coffee aficionados it didn't seem overly suspicious.

  23. #23
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Land of the crazy
    By the way, the Nespresso capsules are made of Aluminum/Aluminium and are recyclable. There's a kitchen store on my way home from work that sells and recycles them. If you're buying them online you can also ship them back to Nespresso, which is admittedly less convenient unless you do it really big batches.

  24. #24
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2006
    Location: Washington DC
    Quote Originally Posted by Kolya View Post
    I'm surprised your barely above body temperature coffee has any taste at all.

    I'm using freshly ground Arabica in a paper filter in a ceramic funnel. On the weekends a stovetop. Pads and pods are an environmental sin that isn't justified by it's taste or cost.
    Quote Originally Posted by Harvester View Post
    205F == approximately 96C, not 38.
    Oops, yeah, screwed up my conversion factor. Should have noticed... but I hadn't finished my morning coffee yet

    Aluminum is definitely way better than plastic as far as environmental impact. I have to wonder how the general push towards reusability and reduction of waste is going to affect coffee- having just coffee grounds and/or paper to recycle is a much lower impact. Same deal with breweries advertising refillable growlers more even though aluminum cans are much more reusable than glass bottles.

  25. #25
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: I think I've been here
    Well I'm glad everyone here is recycling their coffee pods, but many aren't and the things are still an unnecessary waste of resources.

    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeands...-invented-them

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •