TTLG|Jukebox|Thief|Bioshock|System Shock|Deus Ex|Mobile
Page 16 of 16 FirstFirst ... 6111213141516
Results 376 to 395 of 395

Thread: Random thoughts...

  1. #376
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2001
    Location: under God's grace
    Quote Originally Posted by Tocky View Post
    All I recall of Bioshock were some of the lines like "comeback, I only want to help you" while they were shooting at you. Amusing.
    Bioshock had its moments. But System Shock 2 was on an entirely different level. A level that the elevator didn't quite reach because there was a biomass blocking the elevator shaft. Remember Delacroix complaining that someone hacked the computer to play Elvis songs all night? I guess she wasn't a fan even in the middle of all that smoke and debris. I say she could've used some pick-me-up in those grim circumstances.

  2. #377
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: The other Derry
    I never watched Five-O, but when I was in the Air Force I hosted the original drummer for The Ventures, who made the show's theme song into a hit.

    In the USAF, we had a tradition called "dining in":
    These are the hilarious rules of the Air Force’s formal ‘Dining-In’

    As one of the junior officers, I got 'additional duties' which included things like hitting people up for charity, planning retirement parties, and planning the annual dining in. A dining in has to have a guest of honor, preferably a VIP, and we landed a big fish, (4-star) General George T. Babbitt. When we started researching him, one of my coworkers found out he used to play drums for the Ventures, so we decided to see if we could get him to play drums for us. We kept the plan quiet so it would be a surprise to the group, and we didn't know whether he would be cool with it or not. He turned out to be a very good sport. We introduced him playing the Five-O theme, he had a good time, and he apparently enjoyed it enough that he re-united with the Ventures to play briefly in a televised concert the following spring:


  3. #378
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    Wow. That is cool. And knowing you had a hand in that must make you proud. Sometimes having responsibility pays off. I mean, I've never tried it myself, but I can see how it would. I vaguely recall Babbit but not what for (on the off chance I checked on who was the UK wing commander that busted in on me and my girl but that was colonel Logan). Certainly not for the drums. Thanks for the story. I particularly liked rule 14. Thou shalt also be painfully regarded if the clip-on bow tie rides at an obvious list. Thou shalt be forgiven, however, if thee also ride at a comparable list.

    And since we talked about it here is the 5-O theme.


  4. #379
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2024
    Location: Egyptian Afterlife
    Wow Leslie Nielsen was in 5-0, just wow.
    Just a few weeks ago I watched Forbidden Planet again (in english of course).
    Ah the memories, I watched it for the first time in 1984 (yeah I know a bit late).

    Mission Impossible the original series in the mid 80s, but in that case memories were better than the real thing, I mean some episodes were great but others were meh when I watched them again in the 2010s.

  5. #380
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2024
    Location: Egyptian Afterlife
    Quote Originally Posted by Tocky View Post

    Anyway the gas crisis in 72 killed a lot of good looking but heavy cars. The sound and feel of a Holly four barrel kicking in on a 455 is a fond memory though.
    Yeah I still recall the sound of old school cars, even if they were European, American, Japanese or whatever, the sounds meant they were ready to run like hell, nowadays you can barely tell if the engine is on or off (that silent they're now).

    Congratz Harvester.

    EDIT
    Geez anyway to weasel your way out of that dining in?
    Way too many rules.
    Last edited by DuatDweller; 24th Feb 2024 at 06:27.

  6. #381
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Our world has become dystopianly colourless, bland and gray in the last decade

    https://www.onechart.co/the-world-is...0all%20objects
    https://medium.com/@ki90grq8y/colors...y-b2e17a8fde05

    Interior design has shifted toward Scandi all-white everything; renovations and new buildings shift toward neutral, minimalist, sterile designs, etc. Even the already mentioned shift of golden sodium street lights to harsh white LED's (albeit under the guise of efficiency) is worth bringing up again.

    What's interesting too is I saw a study a while back that explained the trend (especially when it comes to interiors) as attributable to internet-induced mental disorder: many people are so overstimulated by social media and the internet, posts, memes, etc., that they want their homes and environments to look like barren hospitals, and somehow find that soothing. I personally can't understand it, I find all-white interiors aggressive and oppressive, but such is the way the world is headed in the 2020's.



    Last edited by Azaran; 27th Feb 2024 at 11:12.

  7. #382
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2001
    Location: under God's grace
    That is so true, and depressing. Luckily there are still old buildings and, at least here in Finland, they're being preserved. I live in an old cloth factory that was built in 1823, and was designed by a German architect. The aesthetic is very beautiful and full of decorative details. I've wanted to live here since 2015.

    Remember those movie theater carpets in the 90's? I love the feeling of space, and all the bits of colour sprinkled everywhere:


  8. #383
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by Qooper View Post
    Remember those movie theater carpets in the 90's? I love the feeling of space, and all the bits of colour sprinkled everywhere:

    I think part of the nostalgia I have for the 90's-early 2000's is society was less depressing, aesthetics were more colourful and joyful, things were more carefree and hopeful. Which is ironic, since today my life is better than it's ever been in almost every way, yet the world is more depressing and gloomy (aesthetically and otherwise), and seems to be on the brink of collapse at any moment

  9. #384
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2001
    Location: under God's grace
    It seems to me that life isn't as much about the now as it is about the path forward.

  10. #385
    Member
    Registered: Oct 2020
    Location: Russia
    Quote Originally Posted by Azaran View Post
    Our world has become dystopianly colourless, bland and gray in the last decade

    (albeit under the guise of efficiency)

    internet-induced mental disorder: many people are so overstimulated by social media and the internet, posts, memes, etc.,
    Lately I've started noticing strange looks on me. When I eat my cherry ice cream (I do it on the way home usually, walking down the street, 10-15 minutes). I started experimenting: pistachio ice cream, chocolate ice-cream, the experiment is still ongoing. But here's what I've discovered so far: ice cream in a waffle cup attracts a lot less attention than ice cream on a stick. Here's my assumptions:
    1) it's february and it's freaking cold here in Russia to eat an ice cream and regarding the attention difference it's just my imagination;
    2) it's always different people out there – why do you think they all have the same reason to look at you and this reason is an ice-cream? Maybe it's time to change my ushanka (hat with earflaps) or lace those earflaps up at least;
    3) ice cream in a waffle cup is easy to confuse with something else, not so 'strange' for such a season, some kind of cake, you know;
    First and second are the most plausible explanations, BUT THEY ARE BOORING! Why the truth is always so boring?!

    But your words gave me a new idea. Must try it tomorrow...

  11. #386
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by Qooper View Post
    It seems to me that life isn't as much about the now as it is about the path forward.
    Social media and smartphones ensure we're no longer in the moment like before.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kamlorn View Post
    Lately I've started noticing strange looks on me. When I eat my cherry ice cream (I do it on the way home usually, walking down the street, 10-15 minutes). I started experimenting: pistachio ice cream, chocolate ice-cream, the experiment is still ongoing. But here's what I've discovered so far: ice cream in a waffle cup attracts a lot less attention than ice cream on a stick. Here's my assumptions:
    1) it's february and it's freaking cold here in Russia to eat an ice cream and regarding the attention difference it's just my imagination;
    2) it's always different people out there – why do you think they all have the same reason to look at you and this reason is an ice-cream? Maybe it's time to change my ushanka (hat with earflaps) or lace those earflaps up at least;
    3) ice cream in a waffle cup is easy to confuse with something else, not so 'strange' for such a season, some kind of cake, you know;
    First and second are the most plausible explanations, BUT THEY ARE BOORING! Why the truth is always so boring?!

    But your words gave me a new idea. Must try it tomorrow...
    Huh?

  12. #387
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2001
    Location: under God's grace
    Quote Originally Posted by Azaran View Post
    Social media and smartphones ensure we're no longer in the moment like before.
    That's definitely true.

    I meant that when there's less and less hope, less good things to look forward to, when the path forward is more difficult, then it's also much more difficult to enjoy the now (because you need to forget for a moment that hard struggling is ahead).

    On the other hand if the path forward is bright, it's easier to stay hopeful and steadfast even if the now is momentarily tough (because you know soon the sun will shine again). In fact if there's a solid hope, one can endure even long stretches of bleak wasteland.

  13. #388
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2024
    Location: Egyptian Afterlife
    Nowadays cars, they are all sourced from a few standard platform chassis, so there is bound to be very little variation, if you look at them almost all cars looks the same.

  14. #389
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2024
    Location: Egyptian Afterlife
    Quote Originally Posted by Kamlorn View Post
    Lately I've started noticing strange looks on me.
    2) it's always different people out there – why do you think they all have the same reason to look at you and this reason is an ice-cream? Maybe it's time to change my ushanka (hat with earflaps) or lace those earflaps up at least;
    They all look at me and my ZZTOP beard when I walk, is not my fault if your wife doesn't let you have a beard I think to myself.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZZ_Top

  15. #390
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2024
    Location: Egyptian Afterlife
    What's a man gotta do when a co-worker tried to kill you by subtle means, I wont go into details right now, but he's keeping calling you from work numbers (he should know I don't answer unknown numbers), why if he want to tell me something doesn't use Whatsapp text messages (nope not even video calls or whatsapp phone calls will be answered).

  16. #391
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Before AI: Don't trust everything you on the internet
    After AI: Don't trust anything you see on the internet.

    I can't believe the amount of AI images being shared on FB as if they were legit (and only like 20% of commenters catch on). It's even got me doubting genuine photographs I see on there now. I instinctively start looking at the minutiae and details to see if they're fake...

  17. #392
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    It'll be especially awesome when political parties start using AI images and videos for muckraking against political opponents or anyone not towing the party line.

  18. #393
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    As dated as the special effects for the first Star Wars seem today, I knew when I saw it, that we were entering an age where the line between reality and pure invention had been crossed. Even the best practical effects still signalled that they were stand-ins for what the director had in mind. We were willing to ignore the obvious trickery to engage the story. Now we don't have to. The work of imagination is done for us.

    Now our job is to see through ever improving falsity and find the truth, if any truth is there.

    This may not be all bad. Perhaps it is an opportunity to up our game, if people are willing to do the background work. But in this climate of autocrats simply telling the crowd to believe whatever comfortable affirmations serve the strong-man's purpose, that's a lot to ask many people.

  19. #394
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2020
    Quote Originally Posted by Qooper View Post
    Bioshock had its moments. But System Shock 2 was on an entirely different level. A level that the elevator didn't quite reach because there was a biomass blocking the elevator shaft. Remember Delacroix complaining that someone hacked the computer to play Elvis songs all night? I guess she wasn't a fan even in the middle of all that smoke and debris. I say she could've used some pick-me-up in those grim circumstances.
    "Would you kindly ..."

    One of the most brilliant things Bioshock did was it took some gaming tropes nobody thinks about, and turned them into actually relevant plot points. I won't say more on that one because of spoilers.

    But one of the best known ones is that you can 'harvest' the little sisters for their ADAM chemical. If you do that you can get upgrades a lot quicker than you would otherwise. So there's a moral choice there to be made, you actually have to sacrifice something to make the decision to save them. A more straightforward game would just give you a reward for saving each one, as progression. This game makes you confront the choice every time.

    So overall I think Bioshock just has more depth. You've got the whole setting, which is based on real-world Libertarian proposals for "Seasteading". Even the focus on the unregulated drugs and medical research, it turns out that's a parody of what those people have actually proposed:

    https://fee.org/articles/seasteading...of-innovation/

    I heard this on Behind the Bastard's two-parter on the Seasteading movement which I caught a few weeks back:

    https://podbay.fm/p/behind-the-bastards/e/1638293764

    https://podbay.fm/p/behind-the-bastards/e/1638442800

    But the genius level factor is that it's not just some "plot point" they turn it into part of the game mechanics and progression system, similar to how the "little sisters" ethical choice you need to make is plot point, ethical decision and has gameplay consequences.

    So i think that's why the depth here beats either System Shock II or Deus Ex, because of the way the plot, real-world satire, and game mechanics interact. For example in Deus Ex you have nano upgrades because they're cool and futuristic. There's no deeper meaning in the story for why you have those, except they wanted an upgrade system and "nanotech" has the "cool factor". But in Bioshock, the upgrade system is based on a critique of these Libertarian Utopia plans that included actual Ocean Cities and ideas about unregulated drug and medical experimentation, and explores the consequences.
    Last edited by Cipheron; 12th Apr 2024 at 21:00.

  20. #395
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Not really.

    As it turns out, the resource implications of the choice about the Little Sisters are rendered mostly irrelevant as you continue with the game. See the graph here. What that leaves are the moral implications of rescuing vs. harvesting, which would have been an interesting area to explore except Bioshock doesn't really do anything with that beyond the bare minimum.

    As for 'Would you kindly...', agreed, it's a great idea. This forum had issues with Bioshock's inability to follow up on the exact thing it was critiquing back in the day, because while the Andrew Ryan scene was an incredible way of putting the exclamation point on it, the game then just fell back to what games always do anyway. The problem of course is that the point Bioshock is making about the nature of video game design is very difficult if not impossible to surmount, so of course it wasn't able to do much about it.

    There are some inconsistencies with Bioshock's depiction of a Randian libertarian utopia with what objectivism actually says, apparently (I didn't dig too deep because quite frankly, I cannot stand Ayn Rand), but it is very literally putting a libertarian wet dream on a sea bed, and despite that being just about impossible to do in the real world the way BS does it, it's definitely a compelling image anyway. BS gets points for attempting to be deep, but in reality it doesn't go much beyond the average scuba diving session.
    Last edited by Sulphur; 12th Apr 2024 at 21:43.

Page 16 of 16 FirstFirst ... 6111213141516

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •