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Thread: Google gaming (Stadia)

  1. #26
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    GeForce Now's an interesting idea in that you're not subscribing to access content, you're subscribing to what is, essentially, hardware. Like renting a compute cluster, but for gaming. Personally, I find that idea more palatable than the Netflix for Gaming angle that Stadia's going for.

    I usually tell people to write down the pros/cons for things if they're making important decisions. This isn't one, but the pros and cons sounded intriguing, so:

    + Instant access to a smorgasbord of games!
    - But you can't own* them, don't get to choose them, and that game you like can rotate out of the service at any time

    + Doesn't need to run from a box that's always going to be outmoded at some later date!
    - Needs high-bandwidth internet and low latency, so good luck if your connection is metered, is unreliable, or not close enough to a Google Data Centre

    + Cheaper than buying all those games!
    +- If you as a consumer prefer to dip in and out of the latest games, this makes sense in the short term. Pay up when something interests you, close your wallet when it doesn't. In the long term, you've paid for time played, not access at will to specific games for an indefinite period of time. Your consumer habits dictate how you feel about this.
    - You'll never get a chance to buy an offline copy of that game you really, really like if it's a platform exclusive

    - Welcome to always online machine learning algorithms that profile your personality through how you express yourself in games - won't it be fun when they can get it to parse your banter in multiplayer?
    - Of course the games will be ad-supported and the ads will be user-profile targeted
    - Offline play? Uh. What?

    Frankly, the over-riding factor is convenience and cost. We as consumers are quick to give up benefits/change priorities in exchange for instant and non-fussy access to something at a low enough price. Google knows this, so the real play they have to make to get traction is choosing the right price.

    If it isn't clear, I'm not a fan of the entire paradigm. Too many technology ifs buts and maybes. Too many things we take for granted being given up. Too many implications that aren't exactly easy to sleep with at night. So no thanks, Google. I don't think so.

    TL;DR - I prefer my games a la carte, so that's where I'm staying.


    *yes, I know, you don't technically own games you buy, you simply get a limited license. In practical terms it doesn't make much of a difference since the license is, in effect, indefinite.

  2. #27
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Welp, Geforce Now just removed the ability to install unsupported games. It was fun while it lasted... on the plus side, it seems that virtually none of the users are ok with this decision, so maybe something will come of the backlash.
    Last edited by froghawk; 11th Apr 2019 at 10:46.

  3. #28
    New Member
    Registered: Mar 2019
    Cloud gaming has been on the market for quite a while but no one was able to launch it to this extent. Though I'm still curious what will be the input lag while playing

  4. #29
    Moderator
    Registered: Sep 2000
    Location: Hong Kong
    Google have just announced that they will launch Stadia in selected countries in November for US$9.99 per month with an initial selection of ~30 games:

    Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2, Doom Eternal, Doom (2016), Rage 2, The Elder Scrolls Online, Wolfenstein: Youngblood, Destiny 2, Get Packed, Grid, Metro Exodus, Thumper, Farming Simulator 19, Baldur's Gate 3, Power Rangers: Battle for the Grid, Football Manager, Samurai Shodown, Final Fantasy XV, Tomb Raider Definitive Edition, Rise of the Tomb Raider, Shadow of the Tomb Raider, NBA 2K, Borderlands 3, Gylt, Mortal Kombat 11, Darksiders Genesis, Assassin's Creed Odyssey, Just Dance, Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Breakpoint, Tom Clancy's The Division 2, Trials Rising, and The Crew 2.
    Source: Engadget

  5. #30
    Southquarter.com/fms
    Registered: Apr 2000
    Location: The Akkala Highlands
    But to play on it this year, you're forced to buy their "Founders Edition" for $130, which includes a controller, a Chromecast dongle, and a 3 month subscription.

  6. #31
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Potentially a really good deal IF you don't have a reasonably up-to-date console or computer. I can't help thinking that they need to be marketing this outside of core gamers? "Hey, want to play these cool games with great graphics but don't want the big fat outlay? We've got something for you!"

  7. #32
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    "Psst! Hey, kid... wanna buy a cloud gaming subscription?"

  8. #33
    Southquarter.com/fms
    Registered: Apr 2000
    Location: The Akkala Highlands
    Seems like a really good deal, and an easy way to play games you'd normally have to pay a bunch of $$$ for the hardware for, but then I read NVs post from the first page and I don't want to contribute to this. Even though the library is thin atm, I see at least 5 games there that I would try out and possibly finish, which would normally run me about 250-300 bucks. Plus I'm sure their inventory will grow by leaps and bound by next year.

  9. #34
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Brethren View Post
    Even though the library is thin atm, I see at least 5 games there that I would try out and possibly finish, which would normally run me about 250-300 bucks.
    Aside from Destiny 2 (and presumably more to come) you still have to pay full price to buy each game you want to play.

  10. #35
    Southquarter.com/fms
    Registered: Apr 2000
    Location: The Akkala Highlands
    Ah, that obviously makes things much different. I thought it was more along the lines of how Playstation Now works. But I guess for $10/mo, that would be way too good of a deal.

    So I'll have to pay a full $60 for a retail game, and have to pay $10 a month just to access it? You can forget that.

    Considering all the hardware costs $130, and the first year will cost you roughly another 100 in subscription fees, I would think most people are better off just picking up a used/new PS4 or Xbox 1.

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