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Thread: Do you feel a nostalgia for the 90s/early 2000s?

  1. #26
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Now you can get textbooks and tutorials on everything to really learn them inside-out. If one can just resist being content with the quick surface answer, there's a lot more depth. I love that part of today over then and try to take advantage of it.

    But it's sad to see the next generation not displaying the kind of patience for complexity we had to grow up with (if that's what's really happening), since if they had it, the information revolution would be doing a lot more good than bad. But I feel like we're on track for the bad timeline right now, as it is.

  2. #27
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Or maybe you are just less likely to bother remembering information you can easily access any time.

  3. #28
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere
    Hey Starker that video you posted was great, I hate it when people say "music of today is so much worse then whenever I was young"

    In fact I would say thanks to internet, streaming etc I am constantly discovering interesting great music I would never have otherwise heard or even known about.

  4. #29
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    It's the cat's meow:


  5. #30
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    Whenever someone gets into one of these "music was better back when I was a kid" arguments, I immediate think back to the early- mid '00's, when nu-metal was king.

    ...then I start screaming.

  6. #31
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    This song is a poem to myself it helps me to live
    In case of fire
    BREAK
    the glass and move on into your own

    OH GOD, I DON'T WANT TO THINK ABOUT IT ANYMORE. PLEASE JUST MAKE IT STOP!

    Music today is a thousand and one times better than it was in the mid 2000's.

  7. #32
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    There's plenty of good music out there today. While I doubt there's much if any that reaches the apex of, say, The Who or The Beatles in their careers (and to be fair these are genre-defining benchmarks), we've got the market cornered on pushing not just the glitzy razzmatazzes and hip hop pop doo wop but also the experimental, the esoteric, the cross-pollinative genre bending post-structure post-genre its of today into the spotlight thanks to our tech infrastructure. It just requires more work than it used to - paradoxically, the fact that it's so easy now means it's also exponentially difficult to curate.

    Decades ago, all you needed was a Billboard or a local radio station that occasionally let you discover something really good. But today they can't deal with the sheer volume - the sluice gates have opened, and we're in the flood, picking out the flotsam and the jetsam we want to take back home and carve fridge magnets out of.

  8. #33
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    I definitely have very fond memories of the second half of the '90s and the first half of the '00s. I started studying in 1995, and for me that was the first time when everything seemed to fall into place: I was doing something I enjoyed, that stimulated me, and I found better friends than I'd ever had before. Later, when I started working at Uni, I had what I expect will end up being the best job I'd ever had, teaching and doing research and pretty much being paid to have opinions and ideas on culture. It's also when I met the woman I'm married to at this point. I had time and energy to do so many things that I loved doing.

    At the same time, even if I tried to get back to that, it wouldn't be the same any more. University work has changed, but more importantly, I have changed. I'm older, I'm no longer as fit - but there's also the flip side that I have grown up in certain ways and I'm glad I have. I've been tested in ways that have changed who I am and how I live my life. I miss those days when I had a job that I loved, working with friends, but I'm also okay with where I am now. I miss much of the life I had, but if I had to live those years again, my big decisions would be the same and most likely I'd end up in the same place.

    And I definitely don't feel that I've got too little music to listen to, whether old or new.

  9. #34
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2003
    Location: Darmstadt, Germany
    Here's what I miss about the 90s:

    1. Eurodance!

    2. Being able to play outside wherever and whenever I wanted to, due to us living in a small town and people not having 17 cars per family of 3 and using 4 of them simultaneously. There was the bus to the city and occasionally some car, but just about all were old communist clunkers and people didn't drive like retarded squirrels on speed.

    3. Having only two state channels on TV and nothing else (one of them only started broadcasting in the afternoon, the other in the morning, but still no 24 hour broadcast). As a kid I really appreciated what little amount of cartoons and kids' movies they would show (and most of those were fantastic - Tom and Jerry, The adventures of Teddy Ruxpin, Starcom, Captain Planet, Nu Pogodi, The Flintstones, Alf, TMNT, The Duck Tales, Inch High Private Eye etc.). Sundays at 19:00 was "The Disney Hour" with great cartoons and films. Twice a year there was a 3-4 hour long TV show for kids, where you could write a letter with a wish about some kids' show and they would show an episode after reading your letter on air. It was a great way to watch some old stuff again, since there was no Cartoon Network and most people didn't have a VHS and if they did, they didn't have many, if any, kids' shows on tape.

    4. There was no mobbing in school, we were all more or less friends and it didn't matter if some where more "stupid" (rather, lazy) than the rest. Kids and/or their parents didn't beat up teachers and each other (that happens a lot in Bulgarian nowadays...) and the kids actually listened to the teachers.

    5. Bulgaria on the semi finals of the World Cup 94!

    The first point is not so important, but what I wouldn't give to have my daughter be able to experience her childhood as I did mine with regard to the other three points...


    Before you wonder how come there weren't many cars on the streets and not many VHS in the homes and no gazillion cable TV channels during the 90s - it was in Bulgaria after the fall of Communism, so people were poor and hadn't been "corrupted" by the west yet (not even sure whether I'm entirely joking here or not).

  10. #35
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    Cartoons KICKED ASS during the 90s.

    Inspector Gadget, Count Duckula, Trapdoor, Danger Mouse, Gargoyles, Captain Planet, TMNT, Babar, Super Mario Bros, Zelda, Toxic Avengers, Transformers, He-Man Bugs Bunny, Road Runner, Pinky and the Brain and so much more.

    Yes I watched a lot of cartoons.

  11. #36
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by dj_ivocha View Post
    ...the kids actually listened to the teachers.
    Why is there this seemingly universal belief that when "we" were young, kids listened to their teachers (and don't now)?

  12. #37
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Yeah, it's weird. I distinctly remember listening to no one as a kid, because fuck 'em. Teachers smeechers, back benchers 4 lyfe. Obviously, because I'm a fan of irony, I embraced training as a career path many years later.

  13. #38
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    And that noise that kidzz these days call MUSIC!! Hurrrr....

  14. #39
    I miss the late 90s. Cold war was over, tech was booming, future looked bright... Then everything went sideways and turned into this dystopian bizarro shit we're in right now.*

    * admittedly a rather reductive summary of the last 20 years

  15. #40
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    Your not far off. That's my opinion of it as well. Well I think we were all good until 9/11. After that everything changed very quickly. None of it for the better.

  16. #41
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    I do remember that moment when big beat was all the rage and then suddenly it was country music everywhere. =L

  17. #42
    SShock2.com
    Member

    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: The land of ever sideways rain
    I'm old enough to have had my first internet experience in 1989 when I was at college. At university, the internet was a new, wonderful world of clever, intelligent people, because it was pretty much just universities connected to it at the time. Yeah, sure, there were a lot of obvious nerd rage (which wasn't a phrase yet) about which was the best Star Trek episode, but largely, people were fairly clever even if they were wrong. Usenet was great for arguing about whether or not KMFDM were metal or industrial or possibly both. And also downloading partially nude pictures, one slow pixel per hour. Then, eventually, after usenet, ftp and gopher, came the next big thing: the world wide web. Great idea, just not much on it for the first few years.

    Then came the commercialisation of the internet. Bleh. For the first few years, before there were any useful services on it, it just became flooded with loudmouthed morons and trolls. Fortunately, I was already old, grumpy, cynical and jaded enough to ignore most of them.

    Many, many, MANY years later, actual useful internet commercial services became available, and we could slowly start using primitive versions of all the stuff we're so used to now. Like buying stuff, and arguing about which Star Trek reboot is worse than the other Star Trek reboot. How times have changed.

    But the 90s was so much more than that. I'm only nostalgic about it now because I was still fairly young at the time. And I distinctly remember being so annoyed with people being nostalgic about the 70s, because I remembered the 70s and from my point of view they were absolute shit. Yeah, I miss certain events of me growing up, but almost all of that could have happened in any decade, just with different backing music. The internet did change things, and youth will never be the same again. Young people now will have it so much worse and better at the same time and won't even know it. Lucky miserable bastards.




    [Edit]

    For me personally, my personality was largely shaped by the music of the 80s and 90s, there was a whole revolution of new stuff coming out at the time, both technologically and thematically. Where I grew up, it was unacceptable to listen to more than one genre of music at a time, all the others were the enemy for some reason, but in the 90s all that was burst open and then all music was everywhere. True, most of it was, as usual, pure shit, but some of it was really really brand new and exciting. And boy, did that music change me. But that's a much longer story.
    Last edited by Gray; 28th Feb 2020 at 21:45.

  18. #43
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Everyone lamenting the decline of music is lamenting the decline of mainstream music, not music itself. There's still loads of great stuff out there, it's just harder to find and you have to wade through heaps of shit to get to it.

    That said, I do miss the sense of collective culture that came from having great music on the airwaves. Everyone knew most of the bands, and there's an ability to connect with people who grew up in the 80s or 90s over shared musical experiences that's missing now because everything is so diversified and everyone is listening to their own musical niche.

  19. #44
    SShock2.com
    Member

    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: The land of ever sideways rain
    Music is a big part of nostalgia. I'm sure there's some great music being made right now, it's just not for me, because it's made by people much younger with a very different world view. I welcome the idea of new music, it's just that not much of it that I hear is any good, because I'm old, and I've heard it all before and done better. Up to about the 90s, every generation tended to make noisier music that would piss off their parents. Well, from the 90s onwards, that sort of shifted, and mainstream music became more bland and pointless, whereas so many more music genres were invented. There was no longer increasingly noisy music in the charts, just increasingly bland, but there was so much more to choose from now. It was both good and bad. That has continued. There must be tons of really awesome new music out there that I never hear, because I'm old, fat, slow and tired and can't be arsed. But I miss the anger of youth that you used to hear in the charts. I want young people to be angry, they should be. There's even more to be angry about now.

  20. #45
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    Quote Originally Posted by froghawk View Post
    Everyone knew most of the bands
    That's the thing with me nowadays. If you asked me what the present day popular bands / singers are, I'd respond with "I have no idea". I barely even listen to the radio anymore, and when I do it's primarily the non commercial stations and sometimes the classical music ones. Even when I try and listen to current music, I just hate it.

    Where as back then, I knew the majority of the singers and bands. Plus their music was all over the movies of the time. For example, American Pie - Blink 182 . Terminator 2 - Guns N'Roses.

    Trance and drum and base were at their highest peak (no drug pun intended) during this decade. Trance was still in it's more electronic sounding style, compared to how it is today with the heavy drum beats etc. It used to be music that could take you away (mentally). Not that there's not good stuff still coming out, it's just the amount of it.

    Rock and grunge music were HUGE during this decade. Gangster rap was great during the decade as well.

  21. #46
    SShock2.com
    Member

    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: The land of ever sideways rain
    Oh. Oh! I think I finally got what's been bugging me.

    Mainstream music, since the 1950s (or further back if you discount mainstream) used to be about rebellion, upsetting the older generation, finding your own place in the world, making noise, and then noisier noise, being angry about what was wrong, making statements, or SEX, or basically just tell people to piss off. Now, as much as I like many of the things that happened in the 90s, there was a distinct shift in the mainstream. True, pop music had always been commercial, I mean, just look at Motown, that was a music factory. But it shifted in the 90s. We got the bloody Spice Girls, as a pre-packaged product of "rebellion", for about two songs before they became the same lame old crap. Girl Power? Look a bit further back for that, please.

    I think my point is that anger and rebellion came out of the charts. Everything had already been done. All the rebellion now just seemed lame and fake. But there were still proper things to get properly angry about, it just didn't hit the charts anymore, we just got bloody boy bands and factory made pop stars. Where's the anger? Where's the rage? Where's the proper upset now, when so many things are quite obviously a lot more shit now than it was at the time? Don't give me Prince Harry doing a duet with Jon Bon Jovi to raise awareness for the Invictus Games (noble as that may be), give me angry shouty teenagers blowing off steam about how the world is shit now and it's all our fault and we need to fix it. Anger! Shouting! Drum machines! Loud, noisy... noise things. Be more pissed off. You should be.

  22. #47
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Definitely. I feel like this upcoming generation doesn't know of any world that isn't mediated. Their voice is already through a medium, a YouTube or a Spotify or a Tweet or whatever. I'm speaking also of even the indie or garage band scene, kids just making music because they wanna be loud and get their emotion out, whether you'd call that something to say or not. (It goes without saying that the producer manufactured music is corporate to its bones.) They always have that kind of influencer tone even for casual talk to people around them. It's not just that they're not going to bite the hand that gives them a voice, but it's like any voice outside of that system doesn't exist. Where would they even be playing; who would they even be playing to, with what voice?

    Like I liked the first album of Regrettes because it had a kind of girl punk edge, a little raw and unvarnished and authentic, but it got gutted after that. I guess there will always be some people inherently unhinged that can't be tamed. Xiu Xiu comes to mind, although he's maybe a bit too unhinged to connect with anything in our era. And I like Josh Turner and Vulfpeck so much because they're so self-consciously bucking the trend.

    NPR Music Tiny Desk is pretty good at fishing some authentic sounds out. The thing there is, the actual authentic voices out there seem to think of themselves as perpetually out of the loop and aren't all that ambitious to actually make a statement. They seemed to be content just getting their music out somewhere and hope to be listened. What's missing now is the ambition of the outsiders they used to have maybe. I think of someone like Trent Reznor who was uncompromising with his sound but also super ambitious to take it to the world. Where are bands like that now?
    Last edited by demagogue; 29th Feb 2020 at 09:34.

  23. #48
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    There's a massive amount of very angry underground hardcore and metal happening right now. Sure, the establishment doesn't want to sell angry anymore, but that's not a bad thing - there was always an incredible irony in that. The kids are still listening to plenty of angry music, don't you all worry. They have the internet and they know where to find it. If you're not making an attempt to seek out and engage with new music right now, that's on you more than anything.

    Don't forget what 80s pop was like, by and large. Yes, you had thrash metal and death metal and hardcore coming up to combat that, but there was an intense sense of bland commercialism then, too. These things come in cycles.

    Beyond that, what you're seeing now is actually all the result of a 1996 telecomm bill which allowed Clear Channel to own most of the radio stations and roll out nationalized programming. That killed local scenes in a way, and it also made popular music much less diverse. The trends in pop are, believe it or not, a legal issue.

  24. #49
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    One thing that occurred to me this week as I've been teaching myself how to do video editing in Shotcut, is that the whole art of teaching yourself things seems to have been lost. Or it just me on that one?

    Want to learn how to program (pre 2000s) - Go read a programming book and then learn via experimenting.
    Want to use a computer - Learn the above first (basic level) then you can navigate DOS. If you deviate over to Linux this one still exists with that.

    Just seems like these days there a hell of a lot of tutorial videos up on Youtube. Now having said all that I did use Youtube videos to know the basics for video editing in the program, but the rest was just messing around and seeing what'd happen.

  25. #50
    SShock2.com
    Member

    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: The land of ever sideways rain
    Quote Originally Posted by froghawk View Post
    There's a massive amount of very angry underground hardcore and metal happening right now. Sure, the establishment doesn't want to sell angry anymore, but that's not a bad thing - there was always an incredible irony in that. The kids are still listening to plenty of angry music, don't you all worry. They have the internet and they know where to find it. If you're not making an attempt to seek out and engage with new music right now, that's on you more than anything.
    Phew! Thanks, I feel better now.

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