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Thread: ☣ Coronavirus ☣

  1. #276
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2006
    Location: Berghem Haven
    Quote Originally Posted by lowenz View Post


    466-440+135 (death / ex ICU)=161 new ICUs patients

    Man, 135 death in 1 day for the same shit.....(they of course pull the plug in ICU).


    560-466+149 (death / ex ICU)=243 new ICUs patients

    It's the end..........

  2. #277
    LittleFlower
    Registered: Jul 2001
    Location: Netherlands
    Listen to this.

    Like many sports-leagues around the world, the NBA (USA basketball) is trying to find a way to deal with the corona-virus. Continue games or not ? With or without spectators ? You know the drill. Nothing decided yet. Nothing changed yet. Games continue as planned.

    Frenchmen Rudy Gobert, center of the Utah Jazz, thinks it's all a load of crock. People are overreacting. It's just the flue. Stop panicking. To make a point, at a post-game media-meeting, Rudy intentionally frobs all microphones. "See, you cowards, nothing to worry about".
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0qxtxIVtOZE

    Today the Utah Jazz was supposed to play in Oklahoma City against the OKC Thunder.
    5 Minutes before tip-off, it gets announced the game will be postponed.
    Two players of the Utah Jazz were rumored to have flu symptoms.
    One hour later, it is confirmed that Rudy Gobert has tested positive for the Corona-virus.

    I'm not kidding.

    Yet another hour later, the NBA announced that all games, the whole season is postponed.
    Nobody has any idea what will happen next.
    Last edited by Gryzemuis; 11th Mar 2020 at 22:09.

  3. #278
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    Back from Rockmart again. Still seems normal down near Atlanta.

    Still, I'm gonna spend the next 9 or so days wondering, and I'm probably gonna hole up at the house for a good bit over the next two weeks or so.

  4. #279
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2009
    Location: The Spiraling Sea
    President Donald Trump's Address to the Nation on the Coronavirus Pandemic


  5. #280
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    Quote Originally Posted by SubJeff View Post
    PS. The USA is in serious trouble. It's not been taken seriously, the politics and economics of it there are going to obfuscate any attempts to be sensible. Sadly. Good luck guys.
    And even though our response has been quick, universal and science based (thanks universal healthcare) Canada faces a huge disease threat from south of the border (thanks privatised sickness industry).

  6. #281
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    It's a good move, though a little late in the game by this point.

  7. #282
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Forcing people to travel illegally where you can't screen them is a good move?

  8. #283
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Sobering article in the NYTimes, ‘It’s Just Everywhere Already’: How Delays in Testing Set Back the U.S. Coronavirus Response.
    The numbers you see reported are only as accurate as the testing getting done.

  9. #284
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    I don't know about the virus, but it sure looks like they are working overtime to contain any criticism and anything that makes the situation look bad.

    https://apnews.com/921ad7f1f08d7634bf681ba785faf269

    NEW YORK (AP) — The White House overruled health officials who wanted to recommend that elderly and physically fragile Americans be advised not to fly on commercial airlines because of the new coronavirus, a federal official told The Associated Press.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention submitted the plan as a way of trying to control the virus, but White House officials ordered the air travel recommendation be removed, said the official who had direct knowledge of the plan. Trump administration officials have since suggested certain people should consider not traveling, but have stopped short of the stronger guidance sought by the CDC.
    [...]
    https://www.businessinsider.com/trum...navirus-2020-3

    Trump said he wants to keep Grand Princess cruise passengers on the ship so that US coronavirus numbers don't 'double.' That strategy failed in Japan.

    * The Grand Princess cruise ship is sitting off the coast of San Francisco, waiting for the CDC's next instructions after 21 passengers and crew tested positive for the new coronavirus.
    * President Trump said Friday that despite what experts tell him, he wants to keep passengers and crew on the ship so that coronavirus cases in the US don't "double."
    * One passenger responded: "He can come on board if he wants and serve us our food and bring me my towel."
    * Japan kept thousands of people onboard the Diamond Princess, another cruise ship from the same company, in a failed quarantine that may have helped the virus spread.
    [...]

  10. #285
    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    Forcing people to travel illegally where you can't screen them is a good move?
    Where is this actually happening, with regards to entering the U.S.?

  11. #286
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    I haven't paid a lot of attention to the US, but you can't just "close down" tens of thousands of miles of borders and pretend everything's okay:

    https://euobserver.com/social/147576

    EU experts said on Thursday (27 February) that refusing entry to an EU country of people with coronavirus symptoms would be counter-productive and "ineffective" to prevent the spread of the virus.

    "Refusal of entry is not considered an appropriate preventive measure as the virus would spread further" since those potential patients would keep moving in the region without being treated, EU sources said.

    Instead, the experts advised having "systematic" checks for all those arriving, ensuring a coordinated approach between border guards and national authorities, as well as a real-time exchange of information.

    [...]
    https://theintercept.com/2020/03/05/...osing-borders/

    While he lacks expertise in any relevant field, President Donald Trump has never shied away from making pronouncements about fighting infectious diseases. “KEEP THEM OUT OF HERE!” Trump tweet-bellowed about American health care workers in West Africa who were infected with the Ebola virus in 2015, calling for harsh border controls to bar travelers from any “EBOLA infected countries.”

    As the world grapples with the spread of a new coronavirus known as Covid-19, Trump still seems to hold similar beliefs on borders. He flirted in the past week with suggestions for border restrictions that would probably do more harm than good. But experts warn that some draconian public health interventions — such as completely closing borders — can quickly become counterproductive. Once a disease has taken hold inside a country, the best options are domestic interventions by state and local public health authorities with ample support from the federal level.

    “I hope President Trump is not thinking about shutting down the borders completely, because then you really do have a situation in which we can’t help other nations and the disease will nonetheless be here,” said Amy Fairchild, an ethicist, public health historian, and dean of the Ohio State University College of Public Health. “We will only end up creating vulnerable, underserved populations in this country, and we’ll exacerbate the challenges of providing aid to African and Asian countries that have more fragile health care systems.”
    [...]
    Also, if you create state of fear and paranoia where people feel like they have to hide their symptoms and are afraid to seek testing, it does nothing to prevent the spread of the virus.
    Last edited by Starker; 12th Mar 2020 at 02:51.

  12. #287
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2006
    Location: Berghem Haven
    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    Forcing people to travel illegally where you can't screen them is a good move?
    You got a point.....

  13. #288
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    I just read this article that's specifically about the Dutch government not taking the problem seriously enough. And as it's become clear, the problem seems to be that people with mild health complaints (or even no complaints at all) think it's nothing and just go around meeting people and spreading the virus.

    For a couple of days now, I'm experiencing minor health issues. A headache, a stuffy nose, a little bit of a sore throat, maybe a mild increase in body temperature (I'd check but my thermometer has an empty battery), that's it. Normally I'd just go about my business as usual with complaints like that, I wouldn't change anything about my daily routine. But right now, I don't want to take any chances. I've asked my direct supervisor and the CEO of my company if I could work from home at least until the weekend, and then see how I feel Monday. They thought it was a good idea, just to be on the safe side. So I'm posting this from my work laptop at home. I'm going outside as little as possible until I feel better, as I said normally I wouldn't let this bother me but right now things are different. Thankfully working from home is not a problem with my job. But the economy is going to be severely impacted by, among other things, the fact that people will have to stay home and self-quarantine (or be admitted to the hospital in more severe cases) whose jobs cannot be done from home.

  14. #289
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by jkcerda View Post
    https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsan...demic-who-says
    Coronavirus: COVID-19 Is Now Officially A Pandemic, WHO Says
    That speech is worth quoting in full:

    https://www.who.int/dg/speeches/deta...-11-march-2020

    Good afternoon.

    In the past two weeks, the number of cases of COVID-19 outside China has increased 13-fold, and the number of affected countries has tripled.

    There are now more than 118,000 cases in 114 countries, and 4,291 people have lost their lives.

    Thousands more are fighting for their lives in hospitals.

    In the days and weeks ahead, we expect to see the number of cases, the number of deaths, and the number of affected countries climb even higher.

    WHO has been assessing this outbreak around the clock and we are deeply concerned both by the alarming levels of spread and severity, and by the alarming levels of inaction.

    We have therefore made the assessment that COVID-19 can be characterized as a pandemic.

    Pandemic is not a word to use lightly or carelessly. It is a word that, if misused, can cause unreasonable fear, or unjustified acceptance that the fight is over, leading to unnecessary suffering and death.

    Describing the situation as a pandemic does not change WHO’s assessment of the threat posed by this virus. It doesn’t change what WHO is doing, and it doesn’t change what countries should do.

    We have never before seen a pandemic sparked by a coronavirus. This is the first pandemic caused by a coronavirus.

    And we have never before seen a pandemic that can be controlled, at the same time.

    WHO has been in full response mode since we were notified of the first cases.

    And we have called every day for countries to take urgent and aggressive action.

    We have rung the alarm bell loud and clear.

    ===

    As I said on Monday, just looking at the number of cases and the number of countries affected does not tell the full story.

    Of the 118,000 cases reported globally in 114 countries, more than 90 percent of cases are in just four countries, and two of those – China and the Republic of Korea - have significantly declining epidemics.

    81 countries have not reported any cases, and 57 countries have reported 10 cases or less.

    We cannot say this loudly enough, or clearly enough, or often enough: all countries can still change the course of this pandemic.

    If countries detect, test, treat, isolate, trace, and mobilize their people in the response, those with a handful of cases can prevent those cases becoming clusters, and those clusters becoming community transmission.

    Even those countries with community transmission or large clusters can turn the tide on this virus.

    Several countries have demonstrated that this virus can be suppressed and controlled.

    The challenge for many countries who are now dealing with large clusters or community transmission is not whether they can do the same – it’s whether they will.

    Some countries are struggling with a lack of capacity.

    Some countries are struggling with a lack of resources.

    Some countries are struggling with a lack of resolve.

    We are grateful for the measures being taken in Iran, Italy and the Republic of Korea to slow the virus and control their epidemics.

    We know that these measures are taking a heavy toll on societies and economies, just as they did in China.

    All countries must strike a fine balance between protecting health, minimizing economic and social disruption, and respecting human rights.

    WHO’s mandate is public health. But we’re working with many partners across all sectors to mitigate the social and economic consequences of this pandemic.

    This is not just a public health crisis, it is a crisis that will touch every sector – so every sector and every individual must be involved in the fight.

    I have said from the beginning that countries must take a whole-of-government, whole-of-society approach, built around a comprehensive strategy to prevent infections, save lives and minimize impact.

    Let me summarize it in four key areas.

    First, prepare and be ready.

    Second, detect, protect and treat.

    Third, reduce transmission.

    Fourth, innovate and learn.

    I remind all countries that we are calling on you to activate and scale up your emergency response mechanisms;

    Communicate with your people about the risks and how they can protect themselves – this is everybody’s business;

    Find, isolate, test and treat every case and trace every contact;

    Ready your hospitals;

    Protect and train your health workers.

    And let’s all look out for each other, because we need each other.

    ===

    There’s been so much attention on one word.

    Let me give you some other words that matter much more, and that are much more actionable.

    Prevention.

    Preparedness.

    Public health.

    Political leadership.

    And most of all, people.

    We’re in this together, to do the right things with calm and protect the citizens of the world. It’s doable.

    I thank you.

  15. #290
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    Quote Originally Posted by Harvester View Post
    But the economy is going to be severely impacted by, among other things, the fact that people will have to stay home and self-quarantine (or be admitted to the hospital in more severe cases) whose jobs cannot be done from home.
    I think that in the countries where being ill can easily ruin you financially people will be likely to hide their symptoms and work anyway, and in turn this will make infection rates considerably worse. So many people simply can't afford to be sick. I fear for these countries.

  16. #291
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Land of the crazy
    Quote Originally Posted by SubJeff View Post
    Probably less that 1% in reality. Based of S Korean data where they have done widespread testing.
    I don't know how you can conclude that from S Korean data when 95% of their 7869 reported cases are still active. So far they've reported 66 deaths and 333 recovered, i.e. 16.5% death rate among cases resolved so far. That ratio can be expected to improve over time if you assume they are being a bit cautious about declaring a patient recovered. But of the 7470 active cases, 99.8% of them would have to survive in order to make the death rate 1%, and that's very, very unlikely to happen.

  17. #292
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    The US medical system in a nutshell:

    https://thecity.nyc/2020/03/the-cost...-10k-bill.html

    First Brooklyn public school teacher Erin McCarthy began experiencing potential coronavirus symptoms after returning from Italy.

    Then a doctor — wearing a hazmat suit — told her she couldn’t be tested because she didn’t fit the criteria at the time.

    But that wasn’t her last shock: She recently got a bill saying her fruitless March 2 ER visit cost $10,382.96.

    “And I wasn’t even tested,” McCarthy said.

    McCarthy is lucky: She has insurance coverage and will only have to cough up a $75 co-pay for her visit to The NYU Langone Health–Cobble Hill emergency department. Her insurance company will pay a negotiated-down rate.

    “But imagine if I didn’t have insurance,” McCarthy said, recounting a time when she was uninsured and wound up paying off an ambulance bill for years after she needed transport following a fall.

    [...]

    After the city health commissioner’s order changing the protocol for testing was issued March 5, McCarthy was able to get an actual test. The results turned up negative for coronavirus.

    As of Tuesday, she had yet to receive a bill for that test, which took place at New York-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital in Park Slope. She said the hospital did not request her insurance information, so she doesn’t expect she’ll be getting a bill.
    [...]

  18. #293
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2005
    Location: Not Kansas
    This is a problem many of us are facing here in the U.S.:

    'Cough? Fever? Coronavirus symptoms are not enough, Americans find, as strict rules limit who gets tested.

    McNamara is a field operations manager at Spectrum and drives for Uber on weekends, so he was concerned about showing up to work sick and possibly infecting others. After going to Adirondack Urgent Care in Queensbury, N.Y., he tested negative for seasonal influenza and was told he had an unknown virus before being sent home.

    McNamara wondered why he hadn’t been tested for coronavirus himself and decided to follow up with the urgent care unit. “They said, ‘Well, we didn’t test you because, No. 1, we don’t test for it here. You’d have to go somewhere else,’” McNamara recounted. “‘But we didn’t recommend any testing because you did not meet the CDC’s criteria of having traveled outside the country to a known nation or place that has it, and you also have not been in contact with anybody who has it." Still concerned, McNamara said he followed up with the Warren County Health Services. But they also told him he did not meet the CDC’s criteria for testing.'


    https://news.yahoo.com/cough-fever-n...184704103.html

    There's also the deplorable fact that there just aren't enough testing kits available here in the U.S., either; in spite of what the Great Orange One has said.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/health/healt...tells-n1151751

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/06/trum...ronavirus.html

  19. #294
    LittleFlower
    Registered: Jul 2001
    Location: Netherlands
    At 1:12: "Our plan has 3 goals 1) Protect, 2) Secure, 3) Set Australia up to bounce back stronger".

    For a moment I thought he was gonna say: "1) Secure, 2) Contain, 3) Protect".
    Last edited by Gryzemuis; 12th Mar 2020 at 10:22.

  20. #295
    BANNED
    Registered: Nov 2016
    Location: Trollinus Maximus
    Quote Originally Posted by Renzatic View Post
    Back from Rockmart again. Still seems normal down near Atlanta.

    Still, I'm gonna spend the next 9 or so days wondering, and I'm probably gonna hole up at the house for a good bit over the next two weeks or so.
    stop fucking lying, this is the CDC in Atlanta
    (Meme removed)

    there is a cure.
    (Meme removed)

    ALL the kids who ate tide pods are safe................

    funnies aside, looks like global economies are going to take a shit, we are going to be hurt for a while.

  21. #296
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2006
    Location: Berghem Haven
    Quote Originally Posted by Harvester View Post
    I just read this article that's specifically about the Dutch government not taking the problem seriously enough. And as it's become clear, the problem seems to be that people with mild health complaints (or even no complaints at all) think it's nothing and just go around meeting people and spreading the virus.

    For a couple of days now, I'm experiencing minor health issues. A headache, a stuffy nose, a little bit of a sore throat, maybe a mild increase in body temperature (I'd check but my thermometer has an empty battery), that's it. Normally I'd just go about my business as usual with complaints like that, I wouldn't change anything about my daily routine. But right now, I don't want to take any chances. I've asked my direct supervisor and the CEO of my company if I could work from home at least until the weekend, and then see how I feel Monday. They thought it was a good idea, just to be on the safe side. So I'm posting this from my work laptop at home. I'm going outside as little as possible until I feel better, as I said normally I wouldn't let this bother me but right now things are different. Thankfully working from home is not a problem with my job. But the economy is going to be severely impacted by, among other things, the fact that people will have to stay home and self-quarantine (or be admitted to the hospital in more severe cases) whose jobs cannot be done from home.
    Good Move.
    You're a responsible guy, thanks!

    See? Isn't really that hard.....

    Maybe I can reassure you a bit: SARS2 doesn't touch the nose.

  22. #297
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    Quote Originally Posted by jkcerda View Post
    stop fucking lying, this is the CDC in Atlanta
    That's the way it always is down there.

  23. #298
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Anyway, about now would be the time to start leaving random audiologs all around the place.

  24. #299
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    Day 21: Geez, I'm real glad I bought that pizza yesterday. Anyway, the train station is on fire, and this one guy looted the whole mall. I still think it's all much ado over nothing.

  25. #300
    So pardon my naivete, but where will all of this eventually end, or at the very least, get under control? Only once a vaccine is developed? Guess I'm just not sure how the cycle works. It seems like other viruses like the flu, common cold, smallpox, measles, etc, are just a part of everyday life now (or were), but I'm sure at one point in history they were very scary too.

    I'm not trying to diminish what is going on, like people who claims "it's just like the flu!" I just flew through Seattle within the past week and trust me, I was Clorox Wiping and hand sanitizing everything in sight.

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