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Thread: ☣ Coronavirus ☣

  1. #3976
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Cipheron View Post
    I read that the kooks are saying the Hypocratic Symbol having snakes is actually proof of this venom thing. It turns out that goes right to the creator of the doco.

    https://rumble.com/vzx4b7-dr.-ardis-...l-real-bo.html
    It bears mentioning that the snake in the medical logo is non-venomous -- it's the snake around the Rod of Asclepius.

    That said though, a not insignificant portion of American medical organisations use the Caduceus (with two snakes and wings), which is the staff of Hermes, the patron of merchants, thieves, liars and gamblers.

  2. #3977
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by Cipheron View Post
    I read that the kooks are saying the Hypocratic Symbol having snakes is actually proof of this venom thing.
    I love how the Illuminati are purportedly so secretive, yet always manage to display their secret symbols in plain sight, that any bozo with an internet connection can ferret them out and immediately expose their secret plans

  3. #3978
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    That's because the Illuminati never anticipated the internet, which they also invented...

  4. #3979
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2020
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/airline...ghts-canceled/

    Airlines that dropped mask requirements are now suffering staff shortages due to COVID-19

    Overseas airlines are having to cancel hundreds of flights as they grapple with coronavirus-related staffing shortages weeks after they ditched rules requiring passengers and staff to mask up in the air.

    The disruptions also come as the CEOs of leading U.S. airlines urge the Biden administration to roll back a federal rule requiring that masks be worn in the sky.

    Masks have not been required on flights operated by budget-friendly Swiss airline EasyJet since March 27, the airline said in a statement. The move came after the U.K. removed all travel restrictions earlier in March.

    "This welcome move by the U.K. Government marks a return to truly restriction-free flying to and from the U.K., giving an extra boost to travel this Easter. We are looking ahead to what we expect to be a strong summer for EasyJet, with plans to return to near 2019 levels of flying. We can't wait to welcome more customers back on board," EasyJet CEO Johan Lundgren said in a statement at the time.

    Between March 28 and April 3, EasyJet cancelled 202 of its 3,517 flights scheduled to depart from the U.K., according to data provided to CBS MoneyWatch from Cirium, an aviation analytics company. By comparison, the carrier cancelled zero flights departing from the U.K. during the same period in 2019, before the pandemic.
    It was a "welcome move" to help with the Easter rush, but now they're saying Easter flights are cancelled due to all their staff being out with Covid.

    https://www.afr.com/work-and-careers...0220408-p5abxt

    Staff absences are threatening to create Easter travel chaos as Sydney and Melbourne airports buckle under the strain of their busiest days in two years.

    Qantas has 18 per cent of parts of its workforce out with COVID-19, or in isolation, and Alan Joyce has met NSW Health Minister Brad Hazzard to implore him to add airline workers to the list of people who can return to work if they test negative and have no symptoms, even if someone in their family is positive.
    Such a far-sighted industry: everyone is getting Covid, so relax the rules so we can shove more people who likely have Covid into our metal tubes.

  5. #3980
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    To be expected. The mask requirement was lifted by a T***p appointed judge with no medical expertise and even less legal experience.

  6. #3981
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Looks like Omicron also causes long covid

    Dr. Kashif Pirzada, a Toronto emergency physician, said he’s seen more people coming in with persistent symptoms after Omicron — most commonly difficulty breathing, and a cough, but also some cognitive issues — than in other waves.

    Often their family doctors have already tried everything they can. “I’ve had patients leaving in tears when we tell them, there’s not much we can do for you,” he said.

    He and his colleagues run tests and send them to a respirologist, neurologist or cardiologist, depending on their specific problems, but the wait times can be long and there’s no guarantee they’ll have answers.

    “I think that the enormous load that these long COVID patients are going to be putting on health services will increase wait times for everybody,” he added.

    In B.C., Dr. Jane McKay, the medical lead for that province’s post COVID-19 interdisciplinary clinical care network, said they have actually seen fewer people coming in lately to their five clinics. Their “referral volume is dramatically down” and there’s no longer anyone on the waiting list.

    This could be because symptoms are not as bad with Omicron, or because family doctors are getting more comfortable navigating their patients though this process, said McKay.

  7. #3982
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    This is only anecdotal of course, but practically the very day omicron first peaked in Tokyo I got my characteristic long covid symptoms back (the arrhythmia & head faints in particular; they're really specific). Fortunately it only lasted for about 2 days and disappeared as quickly as it came on and I haven't been bothered since. Since it's still really hard to get tested here and I never show the respiratory side of it, I still can't officially say it was actually covid related; it's just a very familiar coincidence.

    Responding to the end of that blurb you quoted, I don't know what I would have done if it had persisted. Because of the bad experience I had the first round of it, I probably wouldn't even bother going to the hospital or family clinic because both of them rejected my narrative so completely & left me so dejected that I'd have no incentive to go through that again. I suspect that's closer to the why the referral rate is down, but I could be wrong and/or misunderstanding what they're actually measuring and would defer to somebody that's researched it more.

  8. #3983
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by demagogue View Post
    This is only anecdotal of course, but practically the very day omicron first peaked in Tokyo I got my characteristic long covid symptoms back (the arrhythmia & head faints in particular; they're really specific). Fortunately it only lasted for about 2 days and disappeared as quickly as it came on and I haven't been bothered since. Since it's still really hard to get tested here and I never show the respiratory side of it, I still can't officially say it was actually covid related; it's just a very familiar coincidence.
    Could have been a resurgence of your original one, but who knows.

    On the plus side, looks like this new antiviral is resolving at least some long covid cases


    In one of the case reports, published as a preprint ahead of peer review, a previously healthy and vaccinated 47-year-old woman became infected with COVID in the summer of 2021. Most of her acute symptoms dissipated within 48 hours, but she continued to have severe fatigue, brain fog, exhaustion after exercise, insomnia, racing heartbeat and body aches severe enough that she could no longer work.

    About six months after her initial infection, she was reinfected, likely with COVID, and many of her acute symptoms also returned. Her doctor prescribed a five-day course of Paxlovid.

    On day 3, she noticed a rapid improvement of long COVID symptoms. “She’s back to normal,” said Dr. Linda Geng, co-director of Stanford Health Care’s long COVID clinic and author of the case report posted on Research Square.

    In the second case, Lavanya Visvabharathy, 37, an immunologist working at Northwestern Medicine’s long COVID clinic, was infected in December 2021. Her initial symptoms were mild, but she later experienced chronic fatigue, headaches and sleep disturbances for four months after infection. She also kept testing positive on rapid antigen tests, a sign of viral persistence.

    Visvabharathy was aware of the NIH study and the Stanford case, and decided to try Paxlovid to see if it could clear any lingering virus. Toward the end of the five-day course, her fatigue and insomnia had improved, and her headaches were less frequent. Two weeks after treatment ended, her fatigue was gone.

    “That’s 100 per cent fixed,” she said.

  9. #3984
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2020
    Quote Originally Posted by Azaran View Post
    On the plus side, looks like this Paxlovid is resolving at least some long covid cases
    Wow that definitely looks promising. However I wonder if it's going to be a case where we give it to people because it just works, then work out exactly why it's working later on, and whether it could it be a candidate treatment for people with other similar chronic illnesses, such as chronic fatigue syndrome.

  10. #3985
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    There's a study on Omicron and Long Covid, whose results are coming out on the 6th. Should give an idea of the exact incidence

    https://www.gov.uk/government/statis...micron-variant

  11. #3986
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by Azaran View Post
    There's a study on Omicron and Long Covid, whose results are coming out on the 6th. Should give an idea of the exact incidence

    https://www.gov.uk/government/statis...micron-variant
    It's out

    https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulat...tween-variants

    The odds of reporting long COVID symptoms four to eight weeks after a first coronavirus (COVID-19) infection were 49.7% lower in infections compatible with the Omicron BA.1 variant than those compatible with the Delta variant among adults who were double-vaccinated when infected; this was after adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics.

    However, there was no statistical evidence of a difference in risk between first infections compatible with the Delta and Omicron BA.1 variants among triple-vaccinated adults; the socio-demographically adjusted prevalence of self-reported long COVID was 8.5% for Delta and 8.0% for Omicron BA.1.

    There was also no statistical evidence of a difference in risk between first infections compatible with the Delta and Omicron BA.2 variants among triple-vaccinated adults; the socio-demographically adjusted prevalence of self-reported long COVID was 7.4% for Delta and 9.1% for Omicron BA.2.

    The odds of reporting long COVID symptoms four to eight weeks after a first COVID-19 infection were 21.8% higher after an infection compatible with Omicron BA.2 than Omicron BA.1 among adults who were triple-vaccinated when infected; this was after adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics and time since last COVID-19 vaccination.

    The results above relate to long COVID symptoms of any severity; similar findings were obtained when focussing on symptoms that limited daily activities, except there was no statistical evidence of a difference in the likelihood of activity-limiting long COVID between the Omicron BA.1 and BA.2 variants.
    ...
    Among double-vaccinated, adult study participants, the socio-demographically adjusted prevalence of self-reported long COVID four to eight weeks after a first coronavirus (COVID-19) infection compatible with the Delta variant was 15.9%. This is compared with 8.7% for infections compatible with the Omicron BA.1 variant (Figure 1, first panel).

    Among triple-vaccinated adults, there was no statistical evidence of a difference in the adjusted prevalence of self-reported long COVID between first infections compatible with the Delta variant and those compatible with either Omicron BA.1 (Figure 1, second panel) or Omicron BA.2 (Figure 1, third panel). However, adjusted prevalence was higher for infections compatible with Omicron BA.2 (9.3%) than it was for those compatible with Omicron BA.1 (7.8%) (Figure 1, fourth panel).
    Last edited by Azaran; 6th May 2022 at 09:56.

  12. #3987
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Good news, Echinacea is helpful against Covid

    A clinical study carried out from November 2020 until May 2021 was also included in this review to confirm the applicability of the antiviral benefits of Echinacea. This clinical study investigated the effect of an Echinacea purpurea preparation in dosages within the range of 2,400 mg to 4,000 mg extract per day in 120 adults over five months.

    In the Echinacea and control groups, five and 14 samples tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. During acute SARS-CoV-2 episodes, Echinacea treatment significantly reduced the overall virus load by about 99%, the time to virus clearance by 4.8 days, and fever days to 1 day versus 11 days as compared to the control group.

  13. #3988
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Another study on Omicron and long Covid

    The study, published this week to journal preprint server medRxiv, found that only one Omicron patient out of 18 interviewed had long-term symptoms, versus 10 out of 18 in a group of similar patients who had other COVID variants.

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