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Thread: Infra (released in 2016)

  1. #1

    Infra (released in 2016)

    I'm just finishing up a game called Infra and find it amazing. Has anyone else played this?

    For me, I find that the game-play is vaguely reminiscent of any one of the Thief games. As the player, you're exploring many interesting abandoned locations attempting to document (using a camera) unsafe infrastructure in the buildings you're going through. The locations you're exploring as very well rendered and beautiful to behold.

    Sounds boring on the surface (which is why I hesitated to get it initially), but I'm so glad that I experienced it.

    It's not a stealth game, there are no enemies and no combat, but it captures that "exploring in isolation" feeling that I believe Thief does so well. It also has many interesting environment based puzzles (too many to count) that also reminds me of a really good Thief campaign. It's also a very long game, providing 20 to 30 hours of exploration enjoyment.

    Anyway, if you haven't tried it, I highly recommend it, especially to those of us who enjoy Thief.

  2. #2
    Some here have played it. If you do a search, you'll probably find references to it in the "What Have You Been Playing" thread. I personally love the game, and have put 40+ hours into it (but haven't finished it yet). There was actually supposed to be an expansion at some point too, but it's been delayed and I don't think it even has a release date at this point.

  3. #3
    I assume the game didn't do well financially which is a shame. It doesn't have big numbers on Steam at least.

    The game just goes on and on. I'm assuming I'm near the end of the game, though I could be wrong. I hesitate to watch any videos on it and have only needed two hints to help me along so far. It's just amazing.

  4. #4
    Where are you getting sales numbers for Steam, I thought they didn't make that public anymore? As far as reviews go, it's done great, so no worries there.

    Yeah, it's a long game. I thought I was close to done at one point, and then checked a walkthrough and found out I was only about half way there.

  5. #5
    I've got 71 hours played, finished it twice with different endings and have still done only 54 percent of the achievements, so there is for sure a massive amount of content. Also absolutely the best urbex game I've played and one of the few that really focuses on that aspect.

  6. #6
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Yeah it's a good one! It did remind me of Thief as well, in that the locations feel like real places rather than videogame levels. The areas feel kinda indifferent towards the player, in the same way Thief's levels did. I never finished it, only played the first ~14 hours. I've said it before, but if there's any game that needs a "director's cut" to slim it down to just the best 10-15 hours, it's this one.

    RE: Steam numbers. The only number we really have access to is the number of reviews: 977. It is said that if you multiply the number of Steam reviews by 50 you'll have a roundabout number of copies sold. As someone with a game on Steam I can confirm that this isn't super-accurate, but anyway 50 x 977 = 48 850. Multiply that by the sales price of 28 and you have 1 367 800. But of course from that you then gotta deduct Steam's cut, VAT, regional price differences, refunds, and average sales price, which means in the end the devs gets something like 30% of that, so 410 340. No publisher so they take the whole slice, but they are a quite sizable 11-person team, tho perhaps the whole team isn't full-time employees? In the end, I'm guessing... no one became flithy rich off this, but it probablly didn't ruin them either.

  7. #7
    Brethren...I'm just looking at the number of reviews and not sales figures. I guess it's possible that it was a financially viable game. I just thought there would have been more buzz about it if that were the case. I didn't hear about it at all until 2019.

  8. #8
    henke...I agree that there is definitely a certain amount of repetition in the game but, for a game this size, it's a surprisingly small amount. Just the amount of content which, to me, appears to only have been created as red herrings and dead ends is astounding.

  9. #9
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Ireland
    I did manage to finish it, but it started to feel boring at the end simply because the game was so long.

    Wasn't the game originally much shorter, but got lengthened by them adding a lot of free additions after release?

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by qolelis View Post
    I've got 71 hours played, finished it twice with different endings and have still done only 54 percent of the achievements, so there is for sure a massive amount of content. Also absolutely the best urbex game I've played and one of the few that really focuses on that aspect.
    It's funny, but I thought it was going to be a more "realistic" game which did scare me off a bit early on. Boy was I surprised how quickly everything flew off the rails during the game-play (and I mean that with high praise) which signaled that I got a lot more than I bargained for when I delved into it.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Nameless Voice View Post
    I did manage to finish it, but it started to feel boring at the end simply because the game was so long.

    Wasn't the game originally much shorter, but got lengthened by them adding a lot of free additions after release?
    I believe they added two free chapters to the game at some point based on some of the reviews I saw.

  12. #12
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere
    I played it and really enjoyed, but as others have said it does lose momentum toward the end, could have easily done without the last few levels. I think that once you get back to the city and onto the helicopter would have been a good ending spot.

  13. #13
    Agreed.

    I enjoyed like the first two thirds the most. Towards the end they lost a lot of the urbex aspect, which is why I was playing in the first place, and focused too much on the "open sewer" community thing (maybe as a way of advertising the DLC on the same theme?). It turned into a completely different game there for a while before picking up the structural analyst theme again for the ending. More specifically, the Turnip Hill part could have been skipped entirely and saved for the Open Sewer DLC instead. The city parts could have been skipped too as they didn't add much to the theme of exploring otherwise inaccessible places.

    The first two thirds, on the other hand, had some of the most amazing locales and, in my opinion, plenty made up for the flaws.

    If it had been up to me, I would have focused entirely on being a structural analyst, exploring, photographing, reporting, repairing when possible (enough extra gameplay (or even more action sequences if really desperate -- although preferably not) could have been fitted into that if that's what the devs were worried about), and part of the story could have been told indirectly via colleagues, doing their part of the investigation, and the employer we were reporting to. We wouldn't have been missing out on story and the game would have had a better focus. In my humble opinion, of course (as a player with no insight into the actual dev process).

  14. #14
    One thing I've never figured out is - why photograph stuff? I know when you take a picture of the right thing, you good a little achievement type sound, and your character makes a comment, but beyond that? I stopped doing it about 1/3 of the way through because it didn't seem to have an effect on the game.

  15. #15
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Ireland
    I was about to ask the same question.

    I did it throughout the game, because it was meant to be the goal of the game but... no one even seems to notice if you don't. It doesn't seem to affect the story or game in any way.

  16. #16
    I've had my suspicions about the picture taking. I assumed there was an achievement or something at the end based on the % of pictures taken vs the number of picture opportunities. To be honest, I've been forgetting about my camera for hours at a time so I'll most likely get nothing.

  17. #17
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    I kept taking the photos because I'm a professional and I care about the quality of my work.

    But I guess that's not enough motivation for some people... BRETHREN.

  18. #18
    Yeah, I'm basically just trying not to get electrocuted.

    I'd be curious to know what other "urbex" games qolelis has played (or anyone, for that matter).

  19. #19
    I think after my 200th picture of exposed rebar, I figured I'd go back and tell my boss that any structure I visited that used concrete in it's construction would need a lengthy patching job. Saves on the batteries that last for five picture each.

  20. #20
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere
    I have 4 packs of camera batteries

  21. #21
    Found this thing, looks like more parkour that puzzle solving though:


  22. #22
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    The only things that come to my mind are some Minecraft maps of abandoned cities which were kind of cool to explore and GTA V has some hidden areas you can go looking for, but not enough, and it'd be cool if someone actually modded a urbex game into it since the world is kind of fit for it. Hmm, now that I think about it there aren't that many.

    The game I've been casually making forever (The Revolution) is set in an open world Paris in 1789, and at some point I decided to start making all buildings and the underground openable with procedurally generated areas, properties, and rogue-like events and hidden areas, which is making urban exploration kind of a part of it.

  23. #23
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    The catacombs under Paris are definitely one of the coolest urban structures you can explore.

    <img src="https://res.klook.com/image/upload/fl_lossy.progressive/q_auto/f_auto/c_fill/blogen/2019/09/paris-budget-guide-15.jpg" width="900">

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Brethren View Post
    One thing I've never figured out is - why photograph stuff? I know when you take a picture of the right thing, you good a little achievement type sound, and your character makes a comment, but beyond that? I stopped doing it about 1/3 of the way through because it didn't seem to have an effect on the game.
    The devs have confirmed (in the Steam forums) that it has an effect on which endings you can get -- although they don't give much detail. As far as I know, you'll only notice at the very end if what you gathered throughout the game changed anything, and there are also other factors that might add to it, especially finding story documents or repairing things, while other things are -- probably -- mere bonuses (like various exploration rewards).

    For me, finding things worthy of a photograph was its own reward, and the photo itself was the trophy (or the final culmination of a job well done). While I in real life don't have anywhere near the same patience for finding good photo spots or angles, I can spend a lot of time on it in games.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brethren View Post
    I'd be curious to know what other "urbex" games qolelis has played (or anyone, for that matter).
    I'm curious about that too, actually...

    Valley has elements of it, but is more about exploration in general and also focuses more on action and combat. There are a couple of abandoned factories to explore (sort of), but they are built more like obstacle courses (for enjoying some highly augmented parkouring) than actual factories like in INFRA.

    Most other games that I can think of have just elements of it, like The Vanishing of Ethan Carter or The Old City: Leviathan. Many other games feature urbex-friendly environments, but mostly as a backdrop for something else, like Estranged.

    Just to be clear, I think of "urbex" mainly as exploring once manufactured, but now abandoned, more or less contemporary technotopes. What it's basically about is gaining access to areas that you wouldn't normally visit -- either because they are closed-off to the public or because you have no other reason to go there, so it could also include sociotopes or still active places.

    Edit:
    Quote Originally Posted by Brethren View Post
    Found this thing, looks like more parkour that puzzle solving though:

    [Urban Explorer video]
    Seconding that one. It will be interesting to see what comes of it.
    Last edited by qolelis; 21st May 2020 at 06:56.

  25. #25
    I read a few things about The The Town of Light too, so I want to check that out. It's actually in my Steam inventory, although I don't remember buying it.

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