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Thread: Gaming lethargy

  1. #26
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Same boat here, but I actually feel it's a GOOD thing. Gaming got pretty addictive for me and took me away from my creative work. Now I'm actually making music again, like I should have been doing the whole time I was gaming. Very thankful I'm not feeling the pull anymore...

  2. #27
    Still Subjective
    Registered: Dec 1999
    Location: Idiocy will never die
    A friend of mine says he feels guilty if he plays games now, because there is always other stuff to be getting on with. I kind of get that.

  3. #28
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Especially recently, but generally I've always done this, I play games more like a ritual than for the story or actual full game.

    I play a lot of sims, rogue-likes, and strategy type games that are effectively one-off and just an hour or so at a time. Like, these days, I'll get into GTA V and just drive the big loop around the whole island. (BeamNG Drive, American Truck Sim, Dakar also allow free open world driving.) Or into Descenders and I'll goof around on the starting field, and then a few courses. (Really fun idea. The game opens in an open multiplayer field where you can just ride around and do stunts around other people. Now I like doing that as much as the actual courses.)

    Lots of one off card, board, or puzzle games, Evolution, Carcassone, Magic, TripleA, Hidden Through Time, DROD. The roguelike I'm into now is Caves of Qud. Every time you make it to a new area, there are new threats and opportunities you have to learn, and they tend to be charming and there's a sly humor to it. So I keep coming back, but just to just clear out the first few levels of the next random dungeon on the map until my inventory is overloaded and call it a day. Noita is another great roguelike for one-offs.

    I got some big story games waiting to go through, RDR2, Disco Elisium, maybe Dark Souls counts, Baulder's Gate, Grim Dawn, and Kingdom Come Deliverance... They're all great, but hard to get through now. The main issue with me is my sickness since March has had a long tail, it just won't quit me, so I don't have the same energy every night to handle a slog of a game. I'm sure I'll get back to them when I get the energy back, but for now I'm happy with the one hour one-offs.

  4. #29
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    For me it's more like most games are not relaxing enough after a workday. I still play on weekends and off days, but after work when I ask myself 'I gotta unwind, what should I do for fun and relaxation' most of the time I find myself calmly reading the newspaper, watching the 8 o'clock news and turning on a movie afterwards. If not a movie, then a show or book, but not often a game. On weekends though, I do play games, but around 2 hours a day at most.

  5. #30
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Maupertuis
    After the burglary, I thought to myself, "It's okay. I'll gradually rebuild my console collection and library, and I'll eventually be able to play all the important games that I missed." However, the months that followed, I... realized that I didn't need to. Like, Death Stranding, God of War, Spiderman, etc. from this generation look like they would be immensely interesting to play and analyze. But it's okay if I don't, and it's okay if I lose touch with the mainstream of gaming.

    I've been present for so many eras of videogaming (from the NES era onwards) that I felt like I had an obligation to fully experience each one, in order to someday provide valuable historical perspective about games; for instance, in order to reveal beauty and brilliance that have become obscured by the passage of time and technology. But there is no such obligation, and I can do valuable intellectual work in games criticism, even if I completely lose touch with the remainder of it.

    I'll still figure out a way to play From games, though. And once the PS5 generation has kicked off, I have friends whose PS4s I can borrow.

  6. #31
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    At the very least, you can play Dark Souls Remastered on the Switch.

  7. #32
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Maupertuis
    Oh! Good point! I haven't tried a Faith build yet.

  8. #33
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2003
    Location: East Coast Elite :D
    I'm in a similar state right now. I find myself leaning back on nostalgia during periods like this and have been playing thief fm's. The familiarity of the sounds and style are comforting when I can't seem to get it together to start something new. Weirdly during these periods I also have a tendency to become a workaholic and would rather do work stuff than play a game. I tend to be all or nothing on things like that and I'll eventually get obsessed with a new game and be interested in nothing else for a while. Its just a cycle, at least for me.

  9. #34
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    I’m not sure I’ve EVER experienced gaming lethargy so no I can’t really relate to this YOU WEIRDOS

  10. #35
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2003
    Location: The Plateaux Of Mirror
    That's because you're in a constant state of gaming euphoria somehow. Is it a Finnish thing, like rallying and never showing any emotion whatsoever?

  11. #36
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2001
    Or it's just wasting your young years. We're all guilty of this to some extent, aren't we. I was about to say "better this than drugs or vodka", but I'm not so sure to be honest. I am sure though that human body is not built for hours and hours of sitting staring at one-dimensional screen. It feels much more balanced when it's taken for a 2-hour walk a day, has enough sleep, good food, and when it spends some time in the company of friends and family, doing stuff. Spending countless hours with huge games that will provide memories only you will have (and which will die with you), seems like a waste of life in the long run. Note that time speeds up when you're older. And I agree with Froghawk, it actually feels good for me to cut back, on both games and online activity in general, as it distracts me from my creative hobbies.
    Last edited by Judith; 8th Jun 2020 at 07:09.

  12. #37
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere
    I dunno, I have spend countless hours playing games with my kids, and they definitely werent wasted. For example during our time playing San Andreas, we would play a game when actually driving around the city(in real life that is) and see how many cars we could spot that were ones from the game.

  13. #38
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2001
    Sure, I guess that counts as doing stuff with your family. I was referring to spending tons of time gaming alone. F.i., I don't have kids, and noone in my family plays games, so I can only share that experience with friends sometimes, or online on forums.

  14. #39
    Playing games is just a hobby, like any other. If you get enjoyment out of it, that's a good thing. When someone is happy, they are usually healthier and more productive in life in general. I don't see why playing games would be any different than watching movies, reading books, collecting stamps, playing the guitar, etc. Memories of all that stuff dies with you too.

    That said, I agree there does need to be a balance. Playing WoW for 24 hours straight does not qualify.

    I've always been a fan of games because they are interactive. You're not just staring at a screen, you're actually making decisions and reacting to stimuli. I plan on gaming until they bury me, and I think it'll actually help keep my brain active in my older years.

    And no gaming lethargy here so far. I go on streaks, but always come back to it.

  15. #40
    LittleFlower
    Registered: Jul 2001
    Location: Netherlands
    I've always compared game-time to tv-time. People who are opposed to playing games sometimes spend a lot of time watching tv themselves. If you can chose between watching TV and playing a game, I think playing a game is better.

    I don't think games cause problems in people's lives. But I do think that games can act as a anesthetic. When you need to take action, when you need to wake up and do something with your life, games can act as morphine. They can make you look away from where your focus should be.
    Last edited by Gryzemuis; 9th Jun 2020 at 12:15.

  16. #41
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2001
    I'd definitely wouldn't compare gaming to reading books or playing an instrument. It's really not even close to such level of interactivity and ways for brain to work. Books stimulate your imagination much more, as you interpret language to imagine or visualise things in your mind. Same goes for playing music, there are so many ways to play songs, master techniques, or genres. Not to mention learning to play with others. I had plenty of quality time both with my alone time with an instrument, and in a band during uni years. The sheer diversity of learning and experiences is leagues above games.

    Edit: yeah, a slightly better TV time is probably a better comparison. It will desensitize you if you spend too much time with it, although it will take slightly longer than just watching TV.

  17. #42
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    Honestly, I find this discussion of "Hobby X is better than hobby Y (and I happen to do hobby X)" to be rather silly. As if there is just one way of playing games, reading books, watching TV, making music, and the level of engagement, creativity and intellectual stimulation is always the same and it doesn't differ from one person to the next or from one book/game/TV series to the next, or even from one evening to the next.

  18. #43
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Yeah I'm not buying this idea that a hobby has to be a creative outlet, help you bond with loved ones, or in some other way aid your self-improvement in order to not be "wasted time". I don't think the best way to live your life is to try to maximise your potential every waking moment. Downtime is important. I spend all day doing a job I love and which is creatively fullfilling, so if I wanna sit down and just drive virtual trucks around for a couple hours in the evening, that's what I'm gonna do.

  19. #44
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Lockdown... if only
    To each his own. For me, playing a game is A LOT more interactive and mentally engaging than reading a book. I almost never read fiction anymore, I get nothing from it. I don't watch TV dramas either. On the other hand, I love taking some time to just listen to music. Even though it's just as passive as watching TV, it's more engaging to me.

  20. #45
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    I could live without games, but I can't imagine not being able to read books -- a life without books would be a life lacking philosophy, poetry, history... To be able to reach across time and continents to connect to other minds, to all kinds of ideas, simple and clear, deep and profound, strange and wild, it never ceases to amaze me.

  21. #46
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2001
    I spend all day doing a job I love and which is creatively fullfilling
    You're in like the 1%. Most people don't have such privilege.

    Also, going to my mom's house, sitting on the porch with her and staring at the trees is both quality time and downtime It has nothing to do with constantly working on best version of yourself, more like trying to live a fairly balanced (and rather quiet) life.

    And regardless of content appearing on the screen and me doing something with my thumbs on a gamepad or not, 4 hours of sitting and staring at the screen after 8 hours of working and staring at the screen is never going to be healthy, no matter how I spin it. And if my experience is anything to go by, human body has a way of telling you that. First signals are usually mild, but if you neglect it long enough, it will turn into a big enough fuck you sign

    As for the music, I don't think it's as passive as watching TV, at least never felt like that to me. TV and games that strive to look realistic are usually much lower on my list because of how literal the imagery is. Music always felt more affecting both the imagination and emotional side. Similar with books, although I read mostly mainstream stuff, world classics and journalist pieces.

  22. #47
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Lockdown... if only
    I like to read when I get the chance, but almost exclusively non-fiction these days. History, science, engineering, architecture, etc.

  23. #48
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    Henke's stance is similar to how I feel. I write software for a living and whether that's a creative profession is something that some people could argue about all day but I'm not too interested in the answer, I'm just happy I have a job I like that pays the bills and allows for something extra now and then. But, and I'm saying this as fact instead of seeking sympathy or pity, I work 36 hours a week and for autistic people that alone is pretty rare. I like my job, but a workday takes its toll, I'm pretty beat afterwards. In the evening, after cooking dinner, eating, doing the dishes and taking a 25 minute stroll around the neighborhood to clear my mind and move my muscles, I feel less than zero guilt about spacing out with a book, movie, tv show or game. Usually I finish the newspaper first and watch the 8 o'clock news but after that it's chill time and I don't feel the least bit bad about it. I couldn't care less that those things are not creative hobbies. Now that programming is my job, I don't write code in my spare time anymore because I figure 8 hours a day (4 on Wednesday) for 5 days is enough, in my spare time I need to relax and unwind. I'm sure creative hobbies would be more fulfilling but I don't have the energy. So be it...

    Of course I also like meeting up with friends and family, but I prefer to do that on weekends or on evenings when I have the next day off. Movie night with my best friend is on a Tuesday, deliberately so because I don't have to work Wednesday morning.

  24. #49
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Maupertuis
    The quality within a medium far outweighs differences between media. A playthrough of Shadow of the Colossus is better than any number of hours spent reading grocery store romance novels, and reading The Grapes of Wrath is worth more than any number of hours in League of Legends.

  25. #50
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2001
    whether that's a creative profession is something that some people could argue about all day
    That's an interesting thing for a separate topic I guess. IMO it's definitely is a "creative problem solving", but coders would like the world to see it as something much more? At least that's what I noticed in my work environment, which is probably similar to yours. I also noticed a great deal of disdain, and perhaps envy, coders have towards artists and people with such background in general. I wonder if that's one of the reasons behind trying to automate everything artists do (apart from good money being the obvious one)? But then again, it's a tangent.

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