TTLG|Thief|Bioshock|System Shock|Deus Ex|Mobile
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 37

Thread: Cooking - Whats for dinner?

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere

    Cooking - Whats for dinner?

    Ok, so because this is the night that the Pigman has broken his vows of abstinence Im going to start a new comm chat thread about FOOD, cos thats a new idea.

    -This is the real start so I can delete the previous sentences tomorrow morning

    So pretty sure there are some foodies, cooking lovers etc here, and during the whole social isolation thing I have been really working on my culinary skills, and I mean that seriously. Went and and bought myself a set of really good german steel knives (german being better than japanese cos they are heavier duty and also cheaper), man you should see the cuts on my fingers.
    So - Whats for Dinner?!?

    Tonight hamburgers
    "hamburgers?" you say with derision, well not just any hamburgers, gourmet ones!
    So went to my local butcher, got some nice chuck and rump steak ground up fresh for me, 70/30 ratio. Using my secret homemade burger mould I crafted 5 of the finest patties youve seen, well salted, then in the fridge to draw out excess moisture.
    Secret burger sauce, which I will kindly share with you
    Kewpie Mayo
    Tomato Sauce, or as you weirdos call it ketchup
    American Mustard(or any fucking mustard you want really)
    Mustard Pickle Relish
    Apple cider vinegar
    onion powder
    garlic powder
    paprika
    the amounts of each depends on the taste of the maker, so whatever you like really
    Buttered and toasted brioche buns
    smoky cheddar slices
    sliced tomato(thin slices)
    sliced red onion(again thin cos my knives are sharp)
    ok so bit of oil in the pan, get those patties nice and crusted, then bung em in the oven for 4-5 minutes(make sure the oven is on first)
    ok this is the contraversial bit, shredded lettuce, but you put the lettuce in the secret sauce and mix, that way you have a nice textured sauce and the lettuce prevents it from dripping and oozing outta the bun when eating.
    put it all together and bam! fucking gourmet burger you would pay 29 bucks for in some hipster cafe
    and thats whats for dinner tonight
    WHAT ARE YOU DOING

    ps - you dont have to write a fucking essay but join in and dont make me feel like a sad drunken fool
    Last edited by PigLick; 31st May 2020 at 06:24.

  2. #2
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2011
    Location: Ferrol - Spain
    You should check in Google or Youtube about Fabada, Callos, Lentejas, Guiso de carne, Guiso de pescado, Pulpo a la gallega, Mejillones al vapor, Crema de verduras, Pimientos del Piquillo, Tortilla de patata, Bacalao al pilpil etcetera

  3. #3
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere
    and you should check google or youtube for bibimbap, bulgolgi, and gouchan sauce my friend, thank me later

  4. #4
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Lockdown... if only
    The weather has been good for barbecuing over the last month, so I've been smoking and grilling a couple times a week. I've already done a round of our usual summer staples: Boston butt, St. Louis style ribs, smoked standing rib roast, bacon burgers, jumbo tiger prawns. But I'm going to share something from last weekend that you probably haven't heard of: spiedies.

    Spiedies are a regional summer BBQ food from Western New York State where I grew up. They are based on arrosticini, a regional Italian dish of small cubes of meat cooked on skewers over a special trough-like charcoal grill. Spiedies are similar, but typically use larger chunks of meat that have been marinaded for a long time, and they are eaten wrapped in a piece of bread, sandwich style. You can make them with any kind of meat, but they are best with chicken or lamb. Here's my recipe for lamb spiedies. This feeds a family of four:

    What you need:
    - 3 lbs/1.5kg bone-in lamb shoulder. Lamb shoulder chops or a leg roast should be fine too. Need about 2lbs of actual meat.
    - Italian bread, sliced. The slices need to be long enough and wide enough that you can fold them around the meat and hold in your hand like a sandwich. If you can't find a loaf of bread that's tall enough, small sandwich/hoagie rolls are an OK backup.
    - Olive oil, for drizzling on the bread before toasting
    - Skewers, about 9-10" long would be perfect
    - Marinade (ingredients below)
    - BBQ grill, preferably charcoal but gas is OK

    Optional (these are non-traditional, but my wife likes a little veg too):
    - 1 sweet yellow onion, cut into slices about 1" x 1" x one layer thick
    - 1 bell pepper, similarly sliced

    For the marinade:
    - 1 cup olive oil
    - 1/2 cup dry red wine (red wine for lamb, white wine for chicken)
    - 1/4 cup wine vinegar (or cider vinegar or white vinegar)
    - 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice (takes 2 or 3 lemons for 1/4 cup)
    - zest from one lemon
    - 4-6 garlic gloves, finely minced
    - About 5 tablespoons of minced fresh herbs. Oregano and basil are mandatory, at least 1TB each. I like thyme and rosemary too. I also use mint if I'm making lamb or parsley if I'm making chicken.
    - 1 bay leaf
    - 2 teaspoons black pepper, or 1 tsp black pepper and 1 tsp crushed red pepper
    - 2 teaspoons salt
    - 2 teaspoons sugar

    Instructions:
    1. Prepare marinade
    2. Separate meat from bones and cut into 1" cubes
    3. Place meat cubes into a large freezer bag or appropriate container. Pour marinade over meat and mix thoroughly. Place in refrigerator overnight or up to a few days.
    4. Take the meat out of the fridge about an hour before cooking, and allow it to warm up enough for the olive oil to de-coagulate and re-mix.
    5. Place meat cubes onto skewers. If you're including onion and/or bell pepper, place them in between pieces of meat. Put enough on one skewer for one sandwich, maybe 6-7" depending on the size of your bread slices.
    6. Grill over high heat. The dripping olive oil can ignite and cause flare ups, so be prepared to close the lid and cut off the oxygen to the fire if need be. When done, remove and set aside.
    7. Drizzle olive oil on the slices of bread and lightly toast them on the grill. If you're using sandwich rolls, split (but don't separate) and toast open face down.

    To eat, put a slice of bread in the palm of one hand, toasted side up, place skewer onto bread, grip, and pull the skewer out. Then eat like a sandwich. If your bread isn't big enough or sturdy enough, then just eat off the skewer and alternate bites of meat and bread.
    Last edited by heywood; 31st May 2020 at 13:57.

  5. #5
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    Piglick! Prepare to be boarded.

  6. #6
    Moderator
    Registered: Apr 2003
    Location: Wales
    @ PigLick - what is Kewpie Mayo? And why is shredded lettuce controversial? It's the only type I can eat.

    @ heywood - what do you mean by a sweet yellow onion?

    Both sound very tasty but lamb is astronomically expensive here despite us being surrounded by hundreds of lambs so if you're using chicken, how much chicken? 2lbs?

  7. #7
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2006
    Location: Washington DC
    Kewpie mayo is the Japanese style of mayonnaise, made with rice vinegar and egg yolks rather than the whole egg. It's night and day compared to the flavorless stuff sold as mayonnaise (in the US, at least).

    Quote Originally Posted by PigLick View Post
    and you should check google or youtube for bibimbap, bulgolgi, and gouchan sauce my friend, thank me later
    IMO Korean cuisine is seriously under-appreciated. My neighborhood is the nexus for Korean immigrants in the DC area, and I am ready to die on the hill that says that gochujang is the best sauce ever created by Man. Korean fried chicken is starting to spread and I'll take that KFC over Colonel Sanders KFC any day.

  8. #8
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Lockdown... if only
    Nickie,

    You can use any medium or large sized onion you like, or none at all. It's always hard to tell people what onion to get, because even in my own town, different stores sometimes use different names. Around here, the ones I'm talking about might be called sweet onion, yellow onion, or Vidalia onion (the latter is a specific American variety). They are less pungent than the most common variety of onion, which around here is the brown/yellow/Spanish onion. They also have a bit of sweetness when cooked, hence the name. Here's an example:



    If you're using chicken, the easiest thing to do is get boneless, skinless chicken thighs. Avoid breasts. Get however much meat you need to feed the people you need. The marinade is enough for 2-3 lbs of meat (post-trimming). You can scale it up or down as needed for the amount of meat you have. No need to be precise. With chicken, skip the mint and substitute dry white wine for red.

  9. #9
    Still Subjective
    Registered: Dec 1999
    Location: Idiocy will never die
    Quote Originally Posted by catbarf View Post
    Kewpie mayo is the Japanese style of mayonnaise, made with rice vinegar and egg yolks rather than the whole egg. It's night and day compared to the flavorless stuff sold as mayonnaise (in the US, at least).

    IMO Korean cuisine is seriously under-appreciated.
    I get the impression that a lot of stuff in America that has the same name as stuff in Europe, isn't the same at all. I hear your chocolate is even worse than British chocolate.

    Yep, Korean food is definitely under-appreciated, as evidenced by the low number of Korean restaurants. Great stuff.

  10. #10
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    I don't believe I've had Korean food. I've had Thai, Indonesian, Indian, Philippinese (I have a friend who has a wife from the Philippines) and Japanese, and Chinese is very popular here (but made for a Western palate so markedly different from food they actually eat in China).

    As far as American food is concerned, I'm sure they make good cheese there (maybe in Wisconsin) but photos of those huge rectangular blocks with a shade of yellow that's way too bright don't look appealing to me. But I'm a huge Dutch cheesehead. And then again, most foreigners are disgusted by Dutch licorice, which we love over here. I think every country has its food staples that baffle people from other countries. I used to get a kick out of reading listicles about countries' weirdest foods, like lutefisk, surstromming (spelling?), stinky Tofu and that illegal Italian cheese with live maggots in it.

    Other Dutch food fun fact: in America, kale is considered a super disgusting food that only hipster health nuts like. In the Netherlands, it's boiled and mashed with potatoes, gravy, sometimes bacon bits and a special type of sausage that I believe you can only get in the Netherlands. Most Dutch people like it, including me, it's a typical winter dish. And we like to eat raw herring with raw onion bits. That's a love it or hate it type of food, some Dutchies swear by it and others can't stand it.

    Final edit: alright, enough edits, I'm going to bed. This is me drunk posting by the way, or at least a little woozy.
    Last edited by Harvester; 31st May 2020 at 18:53.

  11. #11
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere
    the bit about the lettuce is that you actually mix it into the sauce
    and yeh korean food is amazing, in fact I am making korean pancakes for dinner tonight!

    Korean food is actually quite popular here in Australia, easy to find a fairly local restaurant, and there are plenty of korean grocers. Korean bbq restaurants are great, kind of like a sukiyaki or steamboat affair, you have a little grill to sear the thinly sliced meats on, and pot of hot broth to dip it into, along with veges and condiments. Not very covid friendly though.
    Last edited by PigLick; 31st May 2020 at 22:43.

  12. #12
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2006
    Location: Washington DC
    Quote Originally Posted by SubJeff View Post
    I get the impression that a lot of stuff in America that has the same name as stuff in Europe, isn't the same at all. I hear your chocolate is even worse than British chocolate.
    Quote Originally Posted by Harvester View Post
    As far as American food is concerned, I'm sure they make good cheese there (maybe in Wisconsin) but photos of those huge rectangular blocks with a shade of yellow that's way too bright don't look appealing to me.
    What you see labeled as 'American food' is really just the big-corporation, mass-market sort of stuff. We have a lot of alternatives, just generally made on a smaller scale and not as ubiquitous (or cheap) as the big brands. Like, I never buy pre-sliced white bread; I get French-style loaves made on-site at our local supermarket. Hershey's chocolate is garbage, but there's plenty of good quality real chocolate available too from smaller companies. And for cheese, most of what my wife and I consume is in Italian styles (particularly sheep's milk), but I will contend that the bright artificially colored stuff is useful in the very specific context of melting on things like burgers or nachos. I guess you could say that most of our indigenous cuisine is fairly low-brow, but we're good at aping and iterating on Old World styles (eg New American cuisine, which is basically American chefs adapting French with a bit of Italian thrown in).

    Globalization has helped a lot as far as availability of imports. I happen to actually like salt licorice, and it's only in the last five or so years that I've been able to easily order it. I mail-ordered surstromming once and thought it wasn't terrible and might actually be palatable in the right context, but as I had opened it outside (at the wife's insistence) I was immediately swarmed by flies like something out of Prince of Darkness and ended up tossing most of it. Pickled herring is great and marginally more socially acceptable, which is to say that my wife tolerates it but I once had a roommate spray me with Febreze as I opened the jar. On the subject of Dutch cuisine, we can also get jenever now, so that's cool.

    Re: Kale, kale's an interesting thing because it's a cultivation of the same root plant as broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, and kohlrabi. It just needs to be cooked the right way; bitter salads and flavorless kale chips like the health gurus promote don't do it any favors. On the flipside, collard greens are a Southern staple and those are fairly similar, partly under the principle that everything tastes good with enough lard.

  13. #13
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2019
    Location: Restaurant at end of universe

    Best Salsa (fresh - no cooking)

    - half of 1 bell pepper
    - 1 16 ounce can of chopped tomato
    - 1 fresh Roma tomato
    - 1/2 onion
    - 2 tbsp garlic
    - 2 tbsp black pepper
    - 2 tbsp parsley
    - jalapeno (whatever you can handle)
    - 2 tbsp of olive oil (so your guts will say i love you)

    Makes about 1 quart - usually disappears if more than 2 people present. can refrigerate for a few days if there is any left. This is good for chips or to place on any Mexican food or any where else you want some heat. Sinful on pizza.

  14. #14
    Still Subjective
    Registered: Dec 1999
    Location: Idiocy will never die
    I don't see the role of the canned tomato in that. Why not just all fresh chopped tomato? Otherwise, looks good!

    Quote Originally Posted by Harvester View Post
    I used to get a kick out of reading listicles about countries' weirdest foods, like lutefisk, surstromming (spelling?), stinky Tofu and that illegal Italian cheese with live maggots in it.
    Smelly tofu is actually really disgusting smelling, but doesn't taste anywhere near as bad. The Japanese raw fermented squid and French tripe sausage (andoulette) are far more difficult to eat. Never again, either of them!

    in America, kale is considered a super disgusting food that only hipster health nuts like. In the Netherlands, it's boiled and mashed
    with potatoes
    Yep, kale is fine if cooked right.

    And we like to eat raw herring with raw onion bits.
    Is this pickled? There are Lithuanian dishes like this. If properly pickled it's nice with dark bread and butter.

    Quote Originally Posted by PigLick View Post
    Korean food is actually quite popular here in Australia
    I expect there is far more immigration due to the proximity. I've met maybe two Koreans (outside of restaurant staff) here in the UK.

    Quote Originally Posted by catbarf View Post
    And for cheese, most of what my wife and I consume is in Italian styles (particularly sheep's milk), but I will contend that the bright artificially colored stuff is useful in the very specific context of melting on things like burgers or nachos. I guess you could say that most of our indigenous cuisine is fairly low-brow, but we're good at aping and iterating on Old World styles (eg New American cuisine, which is basically American chefs adapting French with a bit of Italian thrown in).
    I was amazed that an American friend of mine, 20 years ago now, was so amazed at the cheese counters in our supermarkets. Perhaps it's all changed now though. I think we do an okay job with cheese, having a lot of foreign imports. I'm a massive stilton fan though. It's the best cheese. Change my mind.


    I've a can of black beans I don't know what to do with Help?

  15. #15
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    Catbarf, I get what you're saying about American food. I believe it's the same with American beers. Brands like Coors, Miller and Budweiser have a bad reputation - I've had Budweiser and it doesn't taste bad as much as it doesn't seem to have much of a taste at all, it tastes watery and diluted - but I know there are all kinds of excellent American craft beers available from smaller companies that I'd sure like to try. Even with American fast food, everyone knows McDonald's and its meat that underwent chemical processes to make it last forever. But a friend of mine went to New York and had a burger at an independent joint that's not part of any chain, and he said it was one of the best burgers he's ever had. I'm not one to jump on the 'lol American food is disgusting' bandwagon. That would be weird anyway coming from a Dutch guy. I mean our cheese is famous, but we're not otherwise known for our fine cuisine.

    America does have the reputation of adding sugar (or high fructose corn syrup) to everything, but maybe that's also mainly the big brands. I've had Hellmann's mayonnaise and I don't see why mayo needs to taste so sweet.

    Quote Originally Posted by SubJeff View Post
    Is this pickled? There are Lithuanian dishes like this. If properly pickled it's nice with dark bread and butter.
    There's pickled herring in jars available at any supermarket of a decent size and at fish stores. But the most popular herring is prepared like the herring you see on this page. It's prepared for you like this when you order it at a fish store or market booth. I imagine when you start working at a fish store it takes a bit of training to prepare it the right way and do it fast. At birthday parties it's often cut up in pieces and served on rye bread.

  16. #16
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2019
    Location: Restaurant at end of universe
    Quote Originally Posted by SubJeff View Post
    I don't see the role of the canned tomato in that. Why not just all fresh chopped tomato? Otherwise, looks good!
    You need a basis juice for the salsa to be salsa. Perhaps salsa in 5 mins is a better way to say it. You could use fresh ground tomato its just easier (and cheaper) from a jar or can. I do know if you substitute any ingredients it won't taste the same. I perfected this recipe over several years. Make sure you use extra virgin olive oil. Should have said makes 4 to 5 cups or 2 1/2 pints

  17. #17
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2006
    Location: Washington DC
    Quote Originally Posted by SubJeff View Post
    I was amazed that an American friend of mine, 20 years ago now, was so amazed at the cheese counters in our supermarkets. Perhaps it's all changed now though. I think we do an okay job with cheese, having a lot of foreign imports. I'm a massive stilton fan though. It's the best cheese. Change my mind.

    I've a can of black beans I don't know what to do with Help?
    Stilton is excellent, no argument there. Proper English cheddar is pretty good too and beats the heck out of our orange blocks. As much as English cuisine gets mocked, I think you guys get the simple things- bread, cheese, beer, pickles- just right, and there's a lot to be said for that. Also, gin.

    What blew my mind when I last visited London was how good the curry was. Like, frozen pre-packaged meals at the grocery store rivaling what I get at restaurants back home. It was incredible.

    Re: Black beans, I'm fond of black bean burgers- mash them with spices and a bit of finely chopped onion, form into patties, grill or pan-fry, serve on a bun with lettuce and tomato. Can also go the extra mile and make guacamole and/or pico de gallo.

    Quote Originally Posted by Harvester View Post
    Catbarf, I get what you're saying about American food. I believe it's the same with American beers. Brands like Coors, Miller and Budweiser have a bad reputation
    Oh yep, great example, that didn't even occur to me. I don't drink any of the big brand lagers when there are five or six microbreweries within ten miles of my house, and their products (as well as those of other microbreweries all across the US) are readily available in supermarkets and on restaurant menus.

    Here's the taplist of one of the local ones, if you're curious.

    Quote Originally Posted by Harvester View Post
    I'm not one to jump on the 'lol American food is disgusting' bandwagon. That would be weird anyway coming from a Dutch guy. I mean our cheese is famous, but we're not otherwise known for our fine cuisine.

    America does have the reputation of adding sugar (or high fructose corn syrup) to everything, but maybe that's also mainly the big brands. I've had Hellmann's mayonnaise and I don't see why mayo needs to taste so sweet.
    You know, I hear a lot about Dutch cheese, but my most memorable food experiences in Amsterdam were variations on pickled herring and fried cod. Unfortunately globalization has yet to bring lekkerbekjes to the US.

    The American reputation for putting sugar in everything is well-deserved, and it drives me nuts. Mayo has sugar, bread has sugar, and then the things that should have sugar (eg soda) have HFCS instead. That said, you're right that it's mostly the big brands that do it, and no-sugar-added alternatives are usually readily available, especially with the growing health food market.

    Also, beyond just what goes into the ingredients, Americans in general are accustomed to a sweet palate and recipes follow suit. So for things that are supposed to be sweet we go really overboard (most European chocolate is considered 'semi-sweet' here), we often have sweet variants of things that would otherwise be more savory (like making sugary pancakes, then drowning them in syrup and sweetened whipped cream), and even savory dishes often have a touch of sweetness (sugary barbecue sauce, sweet pickles on burgers). When I cook at home I often find myself omitting sugar from recipes that call for it because it's just too much.

  18. #18
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    Lekkerbekjes, yeah, good one. Licorice and herring are not for everyone but I think most tourists who visit the Netherlands will like lekkerbekjes and kibbeling. I also know that many Americans who try stroopwafels (wafers with a grid pattern with syrup in between) are also quite fond of it, itís perfect for a sweet palate like you guys have.

  19. #19
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2001
    Location: uk
    Quote Originally Posted by SubJeff View Post
    I'm a massive stilton fan though. It's the best cheese. Change my mind.
    It does rather depend on what you're doing with it but for eating it as is there's not a lot that'll beat a decent blue Stilton (I am not a fan of the white stuff) though the locally made blue cheese here is bloody awesome if you like something a little softer.

    Other cheeses have their place particularly for being melted onto stuff though and I'm not sure you'd really get away with Stilton on toast

  20. #20
    LittleFlower
    Registered: Jul 2001
    Location: Netherlands
    lol American food is disgusting

  21. #21
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    I figure that the sugar thing is more down to policies than anything cultural. In countries with universal health care the governments are incentivised to regulate the food industry in order to reduce chronic illnesses and drive down health care costs, but the US doesn't have that problem.

    One thing I don't get, though is the free drink refills and cup sizes. Now, the refill part I do get -- soda is very cheap to make, the profit margins are huge, and most people can't really drink all that much, especially they are eating. However, if all the refills are free anyway, why would anyone ever get a big cup of soda?

  22. #22
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2006
    Location: Washington DC
    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    I figure that the sugar thing is more down to policies than anything cultural.
    TBH I'm not sure what you mean about health policies making a difference. They add sugar because it makes things taste better to a culture where that taste is desirable. If the UK or Netherlands or wherever suddenly rolled back health restrictions on food, I doubt you'd suddenly have sugar overload in everything, because it would (probably) taste gross to you, even if the companies could get away with it.

    The most common beverage in the Deep South is sweet tea, traditionally brewed as a sugar supersaturation (> 2kg sugar per liter). Like I said in my reply to Harvester, it's not just sugar in the ingredients, it's sugar in the recipes- eg a common breakfast food being a sugared pastry covered in sugar syrup and topped with powdered sugar. It's most definitely a cultural thing, and I'm not a fan.

    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    However, if all the refills are free anyway, why would anyone ever get a big cup of soda?
    So you can fill it to the brim right before you leave, pretty much. And/or not have to get up from your chair. In fast food joints, sizes often correspond to combo meals too, so you get a large drink because you ordered a large burger+fries combo or whatever.

  23. #23
    Still Subjective
    Registered: Dec 1999
    Location: Idiocy will never die
    Quote Originally Posted by howeird View Post
    You need a basis juice for the salsa to be salsa... ...I perfected this recipe over several years. Make sure you use extra virgin olive oil. Should have said makes 4 to 5 cups or 2 1/2 pints
    Ah, I see. So I can't mash some fresh tomato with a mortar and pestle to get the same effect? I'm unlikely to have canned tomatoes anytime soon and I'd like to make this. Not 2 pints though!

    Quote Originally Posted by catbarf View Post
    Stilton is excellent, no argument there. Proper English cheddar is pretty good too and beats the heck out of our orange blocks. As much as English cuisine gets mocked, I think you guys get the simple things- bread

    What blew my mind when I last visited London was how good the curry was. Like, frozen pre-packaged meals at the grocery store rivaling what I get at restaurants back home. It was incredible.

    Re: Black beans
    Our bread is really, really dreadful. Really dire. If it's worse in America I just can't. Bread on the continent is soooooo much better. Anywhere. Imho.

    If the packaged curries are great to you then a. the restaurants back home are trash and b. next time you come to London message me and I'll suggest nice curry places for you. Packaged curries are also dreadful, imho, but we do have some really great curry houses.

    I fried the beans with garlic, cumin, coriander, a diced hot chilli pepper (not hot enough), spicy paprika, sugar, some blended plum tomatoes and some good quality (organic farm produce stuff my wife gets in) pork. Had it with rice and a cucumber, cherry tomato and pickled red pepper salad. Was nice. Leftovers will be nicer tomorrow.

    Quote Originally Posted by caffeinatedzombeh View Post
    I'm not sure you'd really get away with Stilton on toast
    Are you trying to enrage me??

    Stilton on toast, with butter, is everything you would want with a beer and a nice trashy movie! Extra points for dipping tomato sauce. Extra extra points if the tomato sauce has tabasco in it.

    re: light American beers. There is something to be said about these unobtrusive refreshers. They aren't far off Corona, Dos Equis, Birra Morretti etc and I think they get an undeserved bad rap.

  24. #24
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    The local McD's here doesn't actually charge different prices for different size sodas. Most places it's just a few cents difference.

    That being said, the drive-thru is not exactly doing free refills anyway.

  25. #25
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by catbarf View Post
    TBH I'm not sure what you mean about health policies making a difference. They add sugar because it makes things taste better to a culture where that taste is desirable. If the UK or Netherlands or wherever suddenly rolled back health restrictions on food, I doubt you'd suddenly have sugar overload in everything, because it would (probably) taste gross to you, even if the companies could get away with it.

    The most common beverage in the Deep South is sweet tea, traditionally brewed as a sugar supersaturation (> 2kg sugar per liter). Like I said in my reply to Harvester, it's not just sugar in the ingredients, it's sugar in the recipes- eg a common breakfast food being a sugared pastry covered in sugar syrup and topped with powdered sugar. It's most definitely a cultural thing, and I'm not a fan.
    Of course people here like sugar and sweet things. If companies around here started to add sugar in everything, people would eat it right up. That's not a cultural thing, it's a human thing. If people didn't like sugar, why do you think it's necessary to keep children away from snacks and junk food? Not because children have a culture of liking sugar, that's for sure. I wager that's also the reason why companies in the US add sweeteners to everything -- it's because they've tested it and found that people like it better. If it was the other way around, that they add sugar to everything because there's such a big cultural demand for it, it would be really curious that the US is such a homogenous place that people have a sugar culture everywhere and that all the immigrants also adopt the culture.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •