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Thread: When Newer Tech is Not Better

  1. #51
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2010
    Location: A Former Forest
    That's a wall unit, but it really looks like someone just used cabinets, but did not attach them to anything but themselves. Usually a wall unit (back in th3 1970s and 80s) was a metal and glass, or oak open structure that would hold a turntable, amp, tuner, TV, speakers, tape machine, VCR, and records... If you were really boss, you had a graphic equalizer. Most tuners and amps were in one unit. Some people had reel to reel tape machines a la "Pulp Fiction".

    If everything is built in to one unit alone, then it was considered a console.

  2. #52

  3. #53
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    I may very much be into physical books, but If I was still working in academia, I think I would've loved having all the relevant literature on a tablet and being able to mark things, make notes, make it fully searchable and have it all in one place. If I was still teaching, I would love being able to project directly from a tablet, draw on it, underline and make connections there and then. I think that this would've also pushed me in the direction of reading more on electronic devices, because I was never a big fan of marking physical books with anything more permanent than pencil.

  4. #54
    New Member
    Registered: Jul 2020
    Location: Oklahoma
    Quote Originally Posted by Thirith View Post
    Absolutely. I've bought one or two (physical) books where the typesetting was so unpleasantly bad that I stopped reading them.
    I usually feel when I'm reading an unprofessional font in a book or e-book that the book itself is unprofessional/ childish/ possibly with inaccurate information. I would actually feel like I need to confirm the information. An easy, professional font makes the difference for me

  5. #55
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    Every damn book I read these days has spelling or grammatical errors that should have been caught by the copy editor. It's jarring. How can they not catch them? Are they not reading them? Maybe they think big time authors don't make mistakes. Well they damn well do.

  6. #56
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Maybe they don't have editors any more. What kind of books are you reading?

  7. #57
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2002
    Location: I think I've been here
    Proof readers are costly and a lot of people don't care. It should be noted that the job of an editor goes far beyond proof reading and can make a middling book into a master piece.
    But the trend is to read straight from the horses mouth, editing is decried as censorship or dilution and publishing houses need to save money, so there you go.

  8. #58
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    I read all sorts of stuff but mostly science fiction and horror. The thing is, it's not just the books you might expect like self promoted stuff at conventions, even Stephen King novels are getting sloppy. The last I read was Harper Lee's last. Of course with her there wasn't a single mistake as a lifetime between novels leaves a lot of time for correction but even so it brings my estimation of others skill level down. They seem no better than me, maybe worse, as I've caught their mistakes. They aren't Gods after all. Oh well, at least they are better at putting commas where they go.

    It makes me wonder if I could be a proof reader. Maybe I should offer my services to my old school bud, Frank Tuttle. Ack, I would have to read a lot of fantasy. Maybe it wouldn't be too bad. I just keep thinking whenever I see him again it's going to be like not thinking of elephants. I hate the "poof and then a dragon appeared" stuff. I've got to read some of his full length stuff someday though. That too has been hard to avoid in conversation.

  9. #59
    SShock2.com
    Member

    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: The land of ever sideways rain
    Windows used to be good and now it's shit
    No, Windows was always shit, now it's just a different, more colourful flavour of shit. Don't confuse nostalgia with quality. And I say that as a Certified Microsoft Professional of several of their OS. I used to be a SysAdmin. Bleh, I spit on "user friendly", it's just another wording for "less control, more awful sucking"! :ahem: But I digress.

    I do agree that certain things seem to go backwards and do not go to their logical, more efficient endpoints, but I blame that on business forces and marketing, not on the engineering advances. Things can always be improved, reinvented, re-engineered, but it's not always profitable no matter how efficient. I'm of the vastly unpopular opinion that marketing and advertising is the natural enemy of everything, including engineering and environmentalism, so I tend to blame them for all the things I despise. I'm all for efficiency, in all senses possible. Greenpeace yes, Apple no.

  10. #60
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    Well, I don't know, I mean I use Ubuntu on my work laptop and it's great for server stuff and Docker containers and the like, and PhpStorm works well on it. People are always touting the virtues of Linux, but frankly as a home OS I would never install it. Not even if I weren't a gamer, I just prefer Windows' GUI to the Ubuntu one. If I had no interest in playing games, I might've considered buying an iMac or MacBook for its OS and the way different Apple product I own (iPhone, Apple TV) work together flawlessly in the Apple ecosystem.

  11. #61
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Ireland
    That's because Ubuntu's default desktop UI is, frankly, terrible.
    It has that bizarre desktop/tablet shared design philosophy, while also having that useless top bar that Gnome Linuxes all have, which takes up space but does nothing useful, while sometimes stealing some (but never all) of your programs' menus.

    Linux Mint with Cinnamon desktop, that's the way to go. Very much like Windows, only it does it better than any modern Windows does. Probably better than even the "good" Windowses like 7.
    There are other parts of Linux which are still terrible, but the desktop interface no longer is.

    Now, as always, the big problems are always software that doesn't work (or work as well) on 'nix. Mostly looking at games and UE4.

  12. #62
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    I used to have no troubles at all setting up a working network between all my desktop PCs, laptops etc. Now it just doesn't work, despite pumping numerous nights and afternoons into it. At first I put it down to having Win 7 when the rest were all Win 10. Then in early this year was forced onto Win 10 and it still doesn't work with the same error. With the same settings had a working one without issue for years.

    I can't stand the file sorting system in Windows Explorer. In Windows 7 it would remember my viewing/sorting choices, with only on the rare occasion it reverting back and needing to be changed again. Ever since moving to Win 10, it reverts back daily. Grrrrr. Only a minor inconvenience yes I know, but it's the little things that all add up for a combined overall experience.

    One positive - Win 10 appears to handle memory better when your running a lot of stuff at once. In Win 7 it would often revert to basic mode. Not had that issue once since upgrading.

  13. #63
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    Quote Originally Posted by Nameless Voice View Post
    That's because Ubuntu's default desktop UI is, frankly, terrible.
    It has that bizarre desktop/tablet shared design philosophy, while also having that useless top bar that Gnome Linuxes all have, which takes up space but does nothing useful, while sometimes stealing some (but never all) of your programs' menus.

    Linux Mint with Cinnamon desktop, that's the way to go. Very much like Windows, only it does it better than any modern Windows does. Probably better than even the "good" Windowses like 7.
    There are other parts of Linux which are still terrible, but the desktop interface no longer is.
    Ah I see. But sadly, I don't think the management at my company would approve of everyone installing their own Linux distro on the company provided laptops so at work I'm stuck with Ubuntu. As for software, I prefer Microsoft Office to LibreOffice by a large margin. And lately I've had two Linux freezes, where only the mouse cursor works, but nothing else, not even Ctrl-Alt-Delete or anything. I just finished a video call with a client where I wrote the changes they wanted to the system I'm building in a text file, and then the freeze happened. Had to press the power button for 5 seconds and reboot, text file gone. Such hard freezes I haven't encountered in Windows for years, so meh about Linux on that front. But doing server and Docker stuff on Windows is a huge PITA, so that's the other side of the equation. PhpStorm, my IDE, works about as well on Ubuntu as it does on Windows and so do Microsoft Teams (what we use for video calls) and Slack, so I have no preference either way.

  14. #64
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Ireland
    You should be able to install the Cinnamon desktop on Ubuntu as well. It should offer you the choice of which installed desktop to use during login, if you have multiple installed.
    (I haven't actually tried that with Ubuntu, but I have done it with a Fedora in the past and it was easy to switch between the two.)

    Lockups in Linux are a huge pain, that's true. You usually have to switch to a terminal session (Ctrl+Alt+F2), then use terminal commands to kill the offending program, before switching back to your desktop session (normally Ctrl+Alt+F7.)

  15. #65
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: Land of the crazy
    Quote Originally Posted by Nameless Voice View Post
    Linux Mint with Cinnamon desktop, that's the way to go. Very much like Windows, only it does it better than any modern Windows does. Probably better than even the "good" Windowses like 7.
    There are other parts of Linux which are still terrible, but the desktop interface no longer is.
    I haven't used Cinnamon in years. Is it finally able to handle a vertical panel properly, with adjustable width and clock and widgets properly drawn? That's been a pet peeve I've had about Linux desktops ever since we went from 4:3 monitors to 16:9. KDE was one of the first to support vertical panels, but it took them years to get it right, and KDE still feels clunky to me.

    I'm so tired of the old Windows 95 and MacOS idioms that most Linux desktops stick with. Worse yet are the desktops that mix the two, like GNOME 2 (and derivatives) with it's Windows 95 taskbar on the bottom and MacOS-inspired menu bar that actually isn't a menu bar on top. And one feature that has almost disappeared from Linux desktops is the multi-desktop pager that displayed thumbnail images of each virtual desktop. I miss those.

    We use Red Hat at work and I haven't suffered a lockup in a long time. We're still on RHEL 7 and we're stuck with that awful old desktop which I hate.

    Quote Originally Posted by icemann View Post
    I can't stand the file sorting system in Windows Explorer. In Windows 7 it would remember my viewing/sorting choices, with only on the rare occasion it reverting back and needing to be changed again. Ever since moving to Win 10, it reverts back daily. Grrrrr. Only a minor inconvenience yes I know, but it's the little things that all add up for a combined overall experience.
    Yeah, that drives me nuts too, but I was having the same problem in Windows 7. In my case, it's not a daily occurrence, but it happens often enough to be annoying. And I haven't quite figured out the pattern of it; sometimes it seems random. Windows also forgets my folder type/template settings (General, Pictures, Music, etc.). You can set a default view for all folders of the same type/template, which gets stored in the registry. But it seems like per-folder preferences are not permanently stored, only cached, kind of like thumbnails. If so, a simple solution for that would be for Windows to store folder metadata in hidden files, rather than caching it.

    MacOS is better in this regard. Ever since the beginning, remembering folder views was a sacrosanct principle of Finder.

  16. #66
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Ireland
    I tried playing around with vertical panels, seems pretty awful. You only get the program icons, no titles, and are very limited to how wide you can make it (max 64 pixels.)
    Might be able to get a custom panel applet that works better, I guess?

    Yeah, the MacOS-inspired bar is the what I was talking about, that's awful. Gnome 3 tries to "fix" this by just now showing a taskbar at all, rather than getting rid of the useless MacBar.

    You used to be able to get a fancy workspace switcher that displayed each workspace on different sides of a cube or other layouts. But the taskbar ones just show a "has windows" icon, they don't show a preview of what's actually on the desktop.

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