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Thread: What are you playing? (2022 Edition)

  1. #176
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Started playing Zelda: Skyward Sword on Switch and it is friggin delightful.

  2. #177
    PC Gamering Smartey Man
    I <3 consoles and gamepads

    Registered: Aug 2007
    Location: New Zealand
    A Cyberpunk 2077 clip I found from my launch period playthrough. I wonder if you can still get amusing glitches like this in the game's current state? Let's find out once they drop the expansion pack probably in 2023.


  3. #178
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    I'm really enjoying Black Mesa, but since it's been such a long time since I played Half-Life, with the bits of level that were probably created first, I sometimes find myself thinking that it doesn't look all that different from the original. Obviously it does, and it'd blatantly obvious if I saw them side by side, but in isolation some things look and feel quite bare - which is okay, because this is still a relatively retro experience, just not quite as retro as the original. And on the whole they've done a really nice job of recreating Half-Life as I remember it, not as it actually was.

  4. #179
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    I finished Black Mesa - and didn't even find "Interloper" such a bad chapter, although it does overstay its welcome - and am now playing Inmost, an... action adventure? Story platformer? It's intriguing and gorgeous to look at, but other than that I can't say much about it after playing for about half an hour. But gorgeous it definitely is, in an O.G. Gameboy with bells and whistles kind of way.


  5. #180
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    I finished Inmost yesterday, and while I would recommend it on the strength of its gorgeous pixel art (with some non-embelishments, in particular in terms of the lighting and particle effects), I wasn't too keen on its story and storytelling.

    spoiler:
    I got the impression early on that this would be one of those indie games that uses symbolism to talk about Big Topics, e.g. this game seems to be about a princess, a falling star and a monster, but really it's about depression/alcoholism/grief. However, the final story reveals (that all arrive in the last 10-15 minutes, and in non-interactive ways) are vastly more convoluted, and for me at least, they turned out to be worse than the generalised, generic thing that e.g. Gris had. Which is a shame, because I enjoyed much of the moment-to-moment writing, but the weight of the plot finally crushed these smaller, more successful moments.

    In addition: it's extremely difficult to reconcile gameplay and themes, but it's necessary to make these games work really well. Here, there's little connection between the two. It's not entirely absent, but it never really gelled for me. There's some stuff of the "He's slow and not very mobile because <thematic reasons>" or "This character has a strong attack due to <symbolism>" variety, but it's relatively thin.


    Still, I'm glad I played this. It's short enough to play because of the aspects that you enjoy, while tolerating those aspects that you could do without. And there is a lot to like here, as long as people are prepared for an ending that may well ruin some of their enjoyment.

  6. #181
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Maupertuis
    I had a great deal of fun with Vampire Survivors, but decided I'd be better off waiting until its full release. It's even supposed to acquire a plot at some point in development!

    Another roguelite, Rogue Legacy 2, had just come out of Early Access, so I gave it a try. It's an action platformer with permadeath, but also with permanent upgrades between characters. It's partially procedural, in the sense of having pre-designed rooms arranged randomly, and unlike its predecessor there are enough room designs that repetition doesn't become a problem. In the original the bosses tended to be bullet-hell affairs, but in this one they're more Souls-like, with big bosses that hit hard and fast, but have tells that you can learn over time. The final boss was a big jump in difficulty over its predecessors, and I was starting to feel fatigued at the game loop, so I've set the game aside for now.

    Then I started playing Your Chronicle, which is another idle/incremental game. It's good for what it is, but also a waste of time unless you happen to have the neurological quirks that make these stupidly long games compelling.
    Last edited by Anarchic Fox; 21st May 2022 at 15:08.

  7. #182
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    After Inmost, I felt like the opposite, a big, bloated, gruff open-world action adventure: Arkham Knight. I'd played it on PS4, but it's nice to crank up all the bells and whistles and play it in ultrawide on PC. And by now it also runs really well - which isn't always a guarantee for a game from around this time. (Dying Light, I'^m looking at you.)

  8. #183
    New Member
    Registered: Oct 2017
    Completing 2nd time now Gothic 3 with Alternative Balancing mod. When I was searching for Gothic 3 addons, I found a page with a few games reviews and read about tools like Borderless Gaming and Reshade and their usage with games. Unless I've got 45-50fps, after enabling around ten of ReShade filters, I did not expect that Gothic 3 graphics can be improved so significantly, closer to Witcher 2, if not even 3. I did not know previously, that shaders can "add" polygons to ingame meshes, objects, and NPCs to look more detailed. Not sure if I will replay Morrowind, but I've installed Overhaul and tuned it up to almost max detail/visibility range. And the game, along with ReShade, downed fps on my Radeon R9 370 to pitiful 35-40 fps.

  9. #184
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Himno. It's not that new of a game. A demo version of it has been out for a few years now. But it's been properly made into a rogue like now, as in it's an actual game now. It wasn't really before.

    What I like about it is maybe 80% of it is pure lowkey platforming. There will be a few enemies in one corner of a map you can take on when you're up to it. But the rest of it will just be you, the platforms, and the little trinkets and whatnot you can pick up.

    It's incredibly chill. And the pretty colors and ambient music add to that.

    There's also the roguelike side, which is all new to me ... resource gathering, crafting, potions & spells, weapons and upgrades. And you have a home base you can build up as you go on. I haven't really figured much of that out yet. There isn't any guidance about it, evidently by design; you just figure stuff out as you go.

    But so far I haven't been really playing it for that side and have been content playing it for the chill experience, which it delivers with flying neon colors.

  10. #185
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2004
    I've been struggling with bullshit lately, so on a kick of very addictive games to take my mind off of things...



    Peglin - a pachinko rougelike where you attack via a peggle-like minigame. Launch an orb and watch it bounce around pegs, each peg counting as point of damage. Different orbs have different effects, special pegs, various enemies, you get the drill. Frankly, I did NOT expect it to be as addictive as it is, but I played the demo like 10 times over and finally got the full game. It's definitely an Early Access (and I somehow managed to beat the full thing in the first day) and there's some annoyance/kinks and lack of long-term progresstion, but the core loop is just really hitting those dopamine levels just right.





    Slice & Dice
    - a mobile game roguelike that pits your party of 5 against random monsters. The kicker is that each "class" is basically a different six-sided dice, with each side having different effects (like attack x1, defend x2, generate 2 mana etc.), and you can keep or re-roll each character dice up to 2 times. It sounds simple but is deceptively strategic. The enemies communicate their attacks so you clearly see who will be affected and how. It's an intricate balance between causing damage, healing, defending, and generating mana, with complexity of choosing the right targets and weighing the risks of keeping or re-rolling a dice. So many times I'd see 4 of my dudes about to die and panic, only to find myself wiping the floor with just the right amount of strategizing. The limited content starts getting really repetitive after a few runs, but it's definitely 100% worth the asking price (and the initial demo version is free!)



    Slay the Spire - I initially bounced off of it, but have been getting into it a bit more lately. I somehow managed to beat the whole game on my first try (lmao) and haven't replicated that yet, but I did unlock the 4 characters. I think I need to read some strategy guides because I keep getting wiped out (and doing _awful_ with the woman and the robot characters). Right now, it feels the enemies just slowly chip my health away over time and I don't have enough defense cards to block or healing opportunities - the right card combo or relic is the difference between success or failure. But I've seen plenty of people saying how fair the game actually is, so I have a sense it's my lack of experience more than the game being too RNG.




    FORWARD: Escape the Fold - a card-based roguelike where you always move forward and have to decide which path to take, with various effects, monsters, treasures etc. It's a solid idea but... it didn't grab me as much. I felt the game very quickly started to feel repetitive, and I did not find a meaningful difference between runs or characters. Feels a bit more mindless than strategic imho





    Destroy All Humans! - remaster of an older game I grabbed for a tenner, you're a condescending alien dude who wants to (drum roll) destroy all humans. Played a few missions and... I don't know, I don't think I'm feeling it? Maybe it's just the starting game, but it feels very on rails (i.e. I feel like I'm doing exactly what the developers wanted me to do with specific powers used in specific situations). Maybe it opens up later, but so far it's just not grabbing me. The writing and voice acting is alright (kudos to Invader Zim voice) but it only got like one chuckle out of me in an hour. Eeeh I think it's just not my genre/humor, don't think there's anything wrong with the game per-se.




    Core Keeper - kind of a top-down terraria in a cave, if you will. It definitely scratched that addictive exploration/digging/crafting itch and was worth the money, but after 10hrs I feel I am done. I defeated the main bosses and the idea of grinding for the extra special bosses just doesn't seem appealing to me. I think that's just how I deal with these kinda games and had the same experienced with Terraria or My Time at Portia - played it for hours and hours initially until I reached a point I just felt "done" and never looked back.
    Last edited by Yakoob; 22nd May 2022 at 17:13.

  11. #186
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: the Sheeple Pen
    Quote Originally Posted by Yakoob View Post
    Slay the Spire - I initially bounced off of it, but have been getting into it a bit more lately. I somehow managed to beat the whole game on my first try (lmao) and haven't replicated that yet, but I did unlock the 4 characters. I think I need to read some strategy guides because I keep getting wiped out (and doing _awful_ with the woman and the robot characters). Right now, it feels the enemies just slowly chip my health away over time and I don't have enough defense cards to block or healing opportunities - the right card combo or relic is the difference between success or failure. But I've seen plenty of people saying how fair the game actually is, so I have a sense it's my lack of experience more than the game being too RNG.
    Yeah, I think that the game is quite fair indeed, but it's a card game so of course you need plenty of luck as well. When you're building your deck, try to specialize on something instead of trying to be "pretty good at everything". Ironclad is the easiest character to start with, I think. I find Silent more fun though, but it's also way more vulnerable and risky. I did finish the game with the robot character (Defect), but Watcher is a relatively new addition, and I never really got around to playing with it. I think Slay the Spire is awesome, the best game of its genre (not that I've played many). I know it can be so frustrating when you've carefully built your deck and you're breezing through the dungeons, and then you bump into some enemy that has some different tricks up their sleeve, and you fail miserably because you weren't prepared for it. It never really feels unfair though, and when you finish a successful run, it's such a great feeling.

  12. #187
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: the Sheeple Pen
    Quote Originally Posted by Thirith View Post
    I finished Inmost yesterday
    I also finished Inmost not too long ago. Here's what I wrote about it in the Ukraine Bundle thread:

    Inmost is a truly depressing 2d sidescrolling adventure game. The gameplay is pretty bad to be honest, but the story kept me going until the end. It's confusing as hell sometimes and a bit too abstract for my liking, and it really is so dark and gloomy that I wouldn't recommend it to everyone. The pixelart graphics are really good and the sounds are top notch. Play this if you're feeling too happy and you've got a couple of hours to spare?
    I still don't know whether I actually liked the game or not. As a game it'd be rather forgettable and really not very good, but there's something quite special about how the game delivers its story, I think. Also, it does look really good, and considering how many pixel art games there are these days, that's quite a compliment. The music really adds to the atmosphere, and makes it all even more dark and depressing. I remember feeling a bit uncomfortable while playing through some parts of the game - I suppose that can be a good thing in a way.

  13. #188
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    I want to check out Slay the Spire at some point, but right now I think I'll probably wait until we have a long trip and then I'll get it on iPad. It sounds like the kind of game that would work well on tablet.

    I'm also really enjoying my replay of Arkham Knight. Compared to, say, the Ubisoft open world games, I like how this one is designed to keep you in the game. It's easy to switch between storylines and side activities, it's usually a very short trip to the next activity, and they're all pretty varied. It's a game where you can easily drop in, play for 15 minutes and feel you've furthered things. The world is gorgeous in a grimdark way, but it's also very compact and less of a sandbox than just a jam-packed playground. The smaller stories are also of more consistent quality than in your average Assassin's Creed game, where you have at least three copy & paste activities to every cool side quest. Obviously Arkham Knight is pulpy (and, as can easily be the case with Batman, it all veers towards the reactionary), but it's pretty enjoyable pulp with a varied rogues gallery.

  14. #189
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Yeah I also replayed Arkham Knight recently and was even more impressed with it then I was the first time around, having had a bit of distance to the other Arkham games. Like you sya, the way it transitions between different missions/sideactivities is very smooth, but I also liked how smoothly the gameplay switches between driving/flying/on-foot/combat. It's all so slick!

    I'm ~27h into Skyward Sword and honestly it's too dang long! It has you rethreading the same ground too many times in slightly different contexts. And the motion controls, which were charming in a quirky way early on started wearing out their welcome around the 20 hour mark.

  15. #190
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    Quote Originally Posted by henke View Post
    Yeah I also replayed Arkham Knight recently... I also liked how smoothly the gameplay switches between driving/flying/on-foot/combat. It's all so slick!
    Yeah, that is really impressive. What I also find impressive, even though it makes the game less approachable: how they don't do the usual thing of stripping all your abilities down to the minimum for the new game. There is something cool in having all of these abilities and gadgets at the beginning of a sequel, even if it makes the learning curve more steep, and then the game builds on this. There's a confidence to Arkham Knight that is really cool.

  16. #191
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: the Sheeple Pen
    I've been playing a bunch of games again. Here are some from the last week:

    Dirt Rally 2: I'm really enjoying this again after taking a little break from the game. These days I mostly play the online daily/weekly/monthly rallies. I really wish I was somewhat good at this game though, but I just can't keep up with the best players; they're often like a minute faster than me on a 10km stage. Of course, I can say from my old Dirt Rally 1 experiences that knowing the stages thoroughly beforehand gives you a huge advantage, and I just haven't got familiar enough with the DR2 stages yet. I think it would also be helpful if I knew how to tune my car, but I often just drive with the default tuning. So yeah, I just need to play more and make an effort to learn all these things, and maybe I'll get better one day. Perhaps I should invest in a half decent racing wheel - I currently use the Xbox One controller!

    art of rally: I play this when I have like 10-15 minutes to spare, and I just want to drive a stage or two and have fun. Often I don't even feel like playing the game for any longer, because there's still no proper "career mode" or anything that would make things more interesting. It's a great rally game though, and it does look very pretty. And I don't have to tune my car!

    Effie: I felt like playing a random game in my games library, and ended up playing Effie. It's a 3D action platformer, very unoriginal and generic in just about every way. The low poly models in the game are outright ugly, the level design isn't very interesting, and the actual gameplay can be a bit frustrating at times. You'd think that this game is from the early 2000's, but it's actually from 2020.

    Colt Canyon: Colt Canyon is a fast-paced 2d action roguelike pixelart thingy set in the Wild West. Sounds like my thing, but I'm not enjoying it as much as I thought I would. The action feels intuitive and especially the stealth kills are satisfying, but it's also very repetitive. the enemies are too stupid, and even though the levels are procedurally generated, every play through still feels like the same. I haven't even got very far in the game, but I don't feel like grinding through the same content anymore, just to unlock some new gun that I'll never use anyway. For me the last straw was finding out that Colt Canyon doesn't have any kind of a save system. I thought that the game would at least automatically save in between the levels, so The world needs more games set in the Wild West for sure, so it's a shame that this one's not very good.

    Book of Demons: Book of Demons is one of the most interesting "Diablo clones" that I've played. It mixes up the standard ARPG gameplay with cardgame elements, and even though the resulting game is much deeper and more tactical, I don't find the combat very satisfying. It might be because I'm playing with gamepad, and it just feels a bit clumsy and awkward. I'm really digging the papercraft-like art style and the music of Book Demons, even though it looks and sounds so much like Diablo. It's intentional though, and some of the dialogue where they poke fun at Diablo is actually quite funny.

  17. #192
    Quote Originally Posted by henke View Post
    I'm ~27h into Skyward Sword and honestly it's too dang long! It has you rethreading the same ground too many times in slightly different contexts. And the motion controls, which were charming in a quirky way early on started wearing out their welcome around the 20 hour mark.
    Motion controls are optional though, right?

  18. #193
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Yeah, I briefly tried the non-motion controls and they felt even worse. Right stick is dedicated to swinging your sword around rather than turning the camera. I felt like they could've made it just control the sword while you're locked on to an enemy. Or even better just cut out the directional faff and just turn sword fighting in a single button you mash (sword fighting is the worst part of the gameplay anyway), tho that'd require serious reworking of a ton of stuff so, eh... it's pretty much motion controls or nothing.

  19. #194
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    I've only played a few hours, but I liked the non-motion controls. I inverted the look button so it feels more intuitive. That way you use the right stick to look around by default -- like in every other third-person 3D game -- then just press the look button when you want to use the RS to swing the sword.

    Once you get the feel down, I'm pretty sure the button controls are much less finicky and much more reliable than the motion controls (not to mention just plain less tiring). And because of the analog stick and haptic feedback, it still feels distinctly tactile and kinetic.

    But I can see how it might all grow old for me, too, after 20+ hours. I'm just dabbling in different games right now, so I probably won't even reach that point until I commit to the game at some later date.

  20. #195
    Moderator and Priest
    Registered: Mar 2002
    Location: Dinosaur Ladies of the Night
    Quote Originally Posted by henke View Post
    Yeah, I briefly tried the non-motion controls and they felt even worse. Right stick is dedicated to swinging your sword around rather than turning the camera. I felt like they could've made it just control the sword while you're locked on to an enemy. Or even better just cut out the directional faff and just turn sword fighting in a single button you mash (sword fighting is the worst part of the gameplay anyway), tho that'd require serious reworking of a ton of stuff so, eh... it's pretty much motion controls or nothing.
    I played Skyward Sword exclusively in handheld mode, and thought it worked fairly well. It took a minute to get used to LB to use the right stick to move the camera, but it didn't bother me much once I got used to it.

    Overall, I thought the game was just...well, okay. It's a classic N64 style Zelda game to a fault. If you liked OoT and Windwaker, you'll probably have fun with this, so long as you're not expecting it break the mold in any way beyond the motion controls.

  21. #196
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Ooooh ok, guess I should've experimented more with the non-motion controls. Anyway I'm so close to the end now I figure I'll just ride it out like this. I've gotten all parts of the Song of the Hero and I'm about to go see Levian again.

    This is actually only my second Zelda game, after BOTW. Dabbled a bit in the older ones via emulator, but never really got into em.

  22. #197
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Maupertuis
    This weekend I found out Daniel Remar, a stalwart of the indie gaming scene with two decades of output, has kept on developing under the Ludosity banner.

    Princess Remedy in a World of Hurt is a lo-fi action game, whose theme is that you're solving people's woes. These woes range from mundane illness to existential crises, represented by enemies you fight (viruses, bacteria etc.) by flinging medical supplies at them. Every successful battle yields an upgrade (health, damage, number of shots, regen, number of flasks (grenades)). At the end you can marry any of the ~100 characters you've healed, and in the sequel you can apparently date any character, so I guess this game is for the polyamorous folks out there. It's a fun thirty minutes, well worth a look.

    Ittle Dew 2: A Zelda-like game with an alcoholic fox sidekick. This games have the classic Zelda structure of overworld plus dungeons with upgrades in each one, but it's much less linear and there is a much heavier emphasis on puzzle-solving. The puzzles are largely block-pushing affairs, but there are moments that require lateral thinking. Combat is easy except for the well-designed bosses, but doesn't feel particularly good. The story is just a vehicle for jokes, but the sense of humor is good, mixing absurdity with dry sarcasm. The second game is an expanded version of the first with a heavier emphasis on overworld exploration, plus a whole bunch of optional bosses, and multiple layers of secrets (I got one bonus ending, but had to watch Youtube for the others).

    Your Chronicle: Idle game silliness, but it provides a helpful neurochemical boost.

    Reventure: A basic, compact platformer with a handful of items (but also a weight limit), and 100 endings. The goal is to try to find every ending. There's one for every death, one for killing every important character, one for hugging every important character, and a "rescue the princess" plot that can go off the rails in two dozen different ways. Every ending has some impact on the world, usually just aesthetic, but sometimes unlocking a helpful shortcut. You can also find hints for the endings scattered about, and also after finding enough endings you get special items (compass and map) to help find the remaining ones. A good time.

    O'Fox Life: A skeleton of a platformer. A student project, I guess. Not worth playing.

  23. #198
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2002
    Location: Edmonton
    Still chipping away at Gran Turismo 7. The GT community is currently up in arms over a lack of new features and updates, but I'm just treating it like training; I won't be satisfied until I can consistently get lap times within a few seconds of the pros. I'm currently nowhere near that level on any track and am having a great time trying shave tenths of seconds off my laps and getting gold on the circuit experiences, which are kind of like the license tests but there's one for every track. I've also completed 20 online races and even won one, which probably makes this my most-played online game ever. My sportsmanship ranking is S, but my skill rating is C, so for me online races are mostly a matter avoiding accidents and losing my nerve. If I can get a clean race, I consider it a win, regardless of my position.

    Overall I'm loving the game; it's got the best driving model of any Gran Turismo: detailed enough to make improving your times feel engaging and worthwhile but not so bogged down with the minutiae of the most hardcore sims. I have dipped my feet a bit in Assetto Corsa Competizione, and it's the real deal -- maybe I'll get into it more eventually -- but for now I'd rather luxuriate in GT7's sun-kissed, ray-traced reflections and smooth lounge music.

  24. #199
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    My current Windows 7 laptop will only allow me to play Thief 1, TG and T2 OG and Fan missions and also really old stuff like Microsoft Train Simulator.... So I've been playing modern games like GTAV, Dirt 4, Dirt Rally 2.0 and Farm Simulator on the Xbox. I finished the offline GTAV series and have been playing the online version for about a year but it can be really annoying at times and the side quests are repetitive. Sometimes old games like SWAT 4 multi-player were more fun and much simpler than GTAV online. Maybe when GTA6 comes out in the year 2050 it will be fun.

  25. #200
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere
    I had a lot of fun with Microsoft Train Simulator back in the day.

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