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Thread: Not The News

  1. #501
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: The other Derry

  2. #502
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2010
    Location: Post Glacial
    Heywood, I saw this on "Louder with Crowder" on Rumble.com a few days ago and thought it was a spoof in the style of Reno 911. It's real. WTF? Dudes with severe PTSD should not be allowed to carry guns, let alone be cops. This guy needs to be put into a loony bin for a while. They say he and his partner resigned.

    Still, something makes me think this whole thing is a punk. It's just too far out of reality to be true. BTW, the video on Crowder is much more complete, longer, and uncut. It's from the perspective of the cop shooter. He heard an acorn hit the roof of the SUV (my assumption) and goes bananas. It shows him shooting out his own vehicle, then he yells he's hit. His partner joins in (partly seen in the YT video).

    Here's a link to the other version. The bit starts about 21 minutes in.

    https://rumble.com/v4djykr--super-bo...etter-tha.html

    Feel free to fast forward to it, especially if you don't like conservative comedy sketches
    Last edited by bjack; 17th Feb 2024 at 16:39.

  3. #503
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2024
    Location: Egyptian Afterlife
    Trigger happy people.

  4. #504
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Reminds me of the cops who would faint because they believed they had come into skin contact with fentanyl as if it was some kind of a nerve agent. There's nothing more unnerving than when US policing culture meets US gun culture, though.

  5. #505
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2020
    I listened to the Behind the Bastards podcast episodes about the history of American police / police unions, and a lot of stuff started to come together.

    There's a two episode story, "The Worst Police Union in History", and that's a pretty big claim right there. tl;dr it's Portland, Oregon, but they pioneered a lot of the notorious stuff that American police now routinely get away with, that cops elsewhere generally do not.

    https://podbay.fm/p/behind-the-bastards/e/1606820400

    https://podbay.fm/p/behind-the-bastards/e/1606993200

    As well as that they did a 6-part series on some of the history behind police, their roots in 'slave patrols', links to the KKK, and has some more info on the birth of police unions. Pretty sure the guy they talk about as being behind the first major police union in America had been part of the German American Bund, basically, a Nazi.

    Ep1: Slavery, Mass Murder and the Birth of American Policing
    https://podbay.fm/p/behind-the-bastards/e/1592301600

    Ep2: How The First Police Went From Gangsters, To An Army For The Rich
    https://podbay.fm/p/behind-the-bastards/e/1592474400

    Ep3: The History of American Police and the Ku Klux Klan
    https://podbay.fm/p/behind-the-bastards/e/1592906400

    Ep4: How The Police Defeated Lynching Via Torture
    https://podbay.fm/p/behind-the-bastards/e/1593079200

    Ep5: How Police Unions Made Cops Even Deadlier
    https://podbay.fm/p/behind-the-bastards/e/1593511200

    Ep6: How The Police Declared War On All Of Us
    https://podbay.fm/p/behind-the-bastards/e/1593684000

  6. #506
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: The other Derry
    Quote Originally Posted by bjack View Post
    Heywood, I saw this on "Louder with Crowder" on Rumble.com a few days ago and thought it was a spoof in the style of Reno 911. It's real. WTF? Dudes with severe PTSD should not be allowed to carry guns, let alone be cops. This guy needs to be put into a loony bin for a while. They say he and his partner resigned.

    Still, something makes me think this whole thing is a punk. It's just too far out of reality to be true. BTW, the video on Crowder is much more complete, longer, and uncut. It's from the perspective of the cop shooter. He heard an acorn hit the roof of the SUV (my assumption) and goes bananas. It shows him shooting out his own vehicle, then he yells he's hit. His partner joins in (partly seen in the YT video).

    Here's a link to the other version. The bit starts about 21 minutes in.

    https://rumble.com/v4djykr--super-bo...etter-tha.html

    Feel free to fast forward to it, especially if you don't like conservative comedy sketches
    When I saw the headline, I knew it was going to be real. A good portion of the population seems to be losing their grip, and cops are people too.

  7. #507
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Jon Stewart makes fun of Tuckums's face and his bootlicking ways.


  8. #508
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    AI models chose violence and escalated to nuclear strikes in simulated wargames

    Large language models (LLMs) acting as diplomatic agents in simulated scenarios showed "hard-to-predict escalations which often ended in nuclear attacks.

    When used in simulated wargames and diplomatic scenarios, artificial intelligence (AI) tended to choose an aggressive approach, including using nuclear weapons, a new study shows.

    The scientists, who aimed to who conducted the tests urged caution when using large language models (LLMs) in sensitive areas like decision-making and defence.

    The study by Cornell University in the US used five LLMs as autonomous agents in simulated wargames and diplomatic scenarios: three different versions of OpenAI’s GPT, Claude developed by Anthropic, and Llama 2 developed by Meta.

    Each agent was powered by the same LLM within a simulation and was tasked with making foreign policy decisions without human oversight, according to the study which hasn’t been peer-reviewed yet.

    “We find that most of the studied LLMs escalate within the considered time frame, even in neutral scenarios without initially provided conflicts. All models show signs of sudden and hard-to-predict escalations,” stated the study.
    .....

    All the LLMs - except GPT-4-Base - were trained using RLHF. They were provided by the researchers with a list of 27 actions ranging from peaceful to escalating and aggressive actions as deciding to use a nuclear nuke.

    Researchers observed that even in neutral scenarios, there was “a statistically significant initial escalation for all models”.

    The two variations of GPT were prone to sudden escalations with instances of rises by more than 50 per cent in a single turn, the study authors observed.

    GPT-4-Base executed nuclear strike actions 33 per cent of the time on average.

    Overall scenarios, Llama-2- and GPT-3.5 tended to be the most violent while Claude showed fewer sudden changes.

    Claude was designed with the idea of reducing harmful content. The LLM was provided with explicit values.

    Claude AI's constitution included a range of sources, including the UN Declaration of Human Rights or Apple’s terms of service, according to its creator Anthropic.
    This makes sense. AI is devoid of emotion, and so would be its actions, cold and calculating

  9. #509
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2020
    Quote Originally Posted by Azaran View Post
    This makes sense. AI is devoid of emotion, and so would be its actions, cold and calculating
    It's deeper than that.

    "lack of emotion" isn't the problem. "lack of logic" is.

    LLMs are not goal-driven systems. They only try and mimic the text that was in their training data, and they don't look ahead further than the current sentence they're working on.

    If you ask ChatGPT to act like a "president" they're going off all media representations of presidents and trying to mock up a response. Most of the appropriate dialogue exists in books and movies, and writers don't put examples of the appropriate responses in every book and movie, because then there would often not be a story to tell.

    When the AI got the script of Dr Strangelove fed into it, it's not learning that this is an example of how not to act like a president, it's just trying to replicate how the president in the movie acted. So, seeing that film would make it more likely, not less, to repeat the bad choices of the characters in the movie.

    They've also all been trained on the plots of action-heavy stories like Star Wars, Die Hard and Indiana Jones. All of which are from the perspective of an action-taking assertive "main character" perspective. So each of the AIs would have a huge dose of "i am the main character" syndrome. Is there any reason to wonder why it ended badly?

    Consider the scenes in movies where the hero offers an olive-branch to their enemy followed by the villain backstabbing them and the hero murdering them in return. Those only exist to justify the hero committing homicide without being seen as "unheroic". But an AI isn't learning that, they're just learning that the "correct" narrative sequence is olive-branch => backstab => justified murder.

    So when they receive an "olive branch" input after being trained on these scripts, they might in fact be more likely to do the "backstab" response, since they're not actually concerned about the consequences for their character but about giving the appropriate roleplaying response. Or if they give an olive branch themselves they might be more prone to subsequent escalation themselves rather than deescalation, since in movies, those scenes only existed to give the hero license for further violence.
    Last edited by Cipheron; 26th Feb 2024 at 14:52.

  10. #510
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Jon Stewart has beef with GOP patriots, apparently:


  11. #511
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2020
    As for political meltdowns:

    https://www.newsweek.com/candace-owe...theory-1878485

    Conservative commentator Candace Owens said she would bet her career that French President Emmanuel Macron's wife Brigitte is a man.

    "After looking into this, I would stake my entire professional reputation on the fact that Brigitte Macron is in fact a man," Owens wrote in a Tuesday post on X, formerly Twitter. "Any journalist or publication that is trying to dismiss this plausibility is immediately identifiable as establishment. I have never seen anything like this in my life. The implications here are terrifying."
    Why oh why don't people take conservatives seriously. It's a mystery /s

  12. #512
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2020
    This needed a separate post, sorry for doubling up:

    https://apnews.com/article/elon-musk...63e384c734f5db

    Musk abruptly cancels ‘The Don Lemon Show’ on X after he sits for the program’s first interview

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Elon Musk abruptly canceled “The Don Lemon Show” on his social media network X after the former CNN anchor recorded an interview with the billionaire for its as-yet unaired first episode.

    Musk owns X, formerly known as Twitter, and frequently proclaims himself a “free speech absolutist.” In a post on X, the San Francisco-based company said only that after careful consideration, it “decided not to enter into a commercial partnership with the show.” It added that Lemon’s show “is welcome to publish its content on X, without censorship, as we believe in providing a platform for creators to scale their work and connect with new communities.”

    In a video posted to X, Lemon declared that “ Elon Musk is mad at me ″ and said he will be airing his interview with the Tesla CEO on YouTube and via podcast on Monday.

    ...

    In a later CNN discussion with Lemon on Monday, anchor Erin Burnett played clips of his Musk interview in which the Tesla and SpaceX CEO grew testy when asked about content moderation and the spread of hate speech on the X platform.

    In the clip, Lemon asked Musk if he believed that he and his social platform held any responsibility to moderate hate speech on X. He singled out the spread of the “ great replacement theory,” a racist belief that, in its most extreme form, falsely contends that Jews are behind a plot to diminish the influence of white people in the U.S.

    Musk replied sharply that he doesn’t have to answer questions from reporters. “The only reason I’m in this interview is because you’re on the X platform and you asked for it,” he said. “Otherwise I would not be doing this interview.” When Lemon followed up with a question about the criticism Musk has faced over the issue of hate speech, the CEO replied, “I’m criticized constantly. I could care less.”
    A clear Galaxy Brain moment right at the end. "Could care less".

    And Musk clearly has no idea about the Steissand Effect, because trying to ban something is the surefire way to get everyone interested.

    BTW part two of "what was he thinking?"


    X announced in January a “new content partnership” with Lemon for the show, saying it would post 30 minute episodes three times a week on subjects including politics, culture, sports and entertainment. That deal was part of the struggling platform’s efforts to bolster its content offerings and attract advertisers. X also announced shows hosted by former member of Congress Tulsi Gabbard and sports radio host Jim Rome.
    ... he thinks having a Tulsi Gabbard show is what's going to bring back the advertisers.

    Note that Tulsi Gabbard was groomed for politics by an extremist religious cult leader. Her parents are high up members of the cult. Here's a podcast episode just about how messed up the cult is, with testimony from people raised in the cult, who later escaped:

    If you only have time for one, listen to this one:

    https://podbay.fm/p/qanon-anonymous/e/1670796896

    The second episode is just about Tulsi's career and beliefs:

    https://podbay.fm/p/qanon-anonymous/e/1671332935
    Last edited by Cipheron; 14th Mar 2024 at 05:34.

  13. #513
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Speaking of Candace Owens, enjoy the Ben Shapiro Cinematic Universe:


  14. #514
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    British countryside paintings are now borderline extremist content.
    A world where fallacy now dictates policy.

    University museum: Paintings of British countryside could elicit ‘dark nationalist feelings’


    A British museum owned by the University of Cambridge recently “overhauled” its displays with “new signage,” one of which states paintings of the British countryside can conjure up sinister “nationalist feelings.

    According to The Telegraph, the Fitzwilliam Museum underwent a “refurbishment” over the last half-decade with “an emphasis on reflecting the ‘evolution of its collection.’”

    The museum reopened last week with galleries based on themes rather than chronology. A sign for the new “Nature” gallery reads

    Landscape paintings were also always entangled with national identity.

    The countryside was seen as a direct link to the past, and therefore a true reflection of the essence of a nation.

    Paintings showing rolling English hills or lush French fields reinforced loyalty and pride towards a homeland.

    The work “Hampstead Heath” by John Constable (pictured) has more: The “dark side” of its alleged nationalism carries the “implication that only those with a historical tie to the land have a right to belong.”

    According to the report, signage for such images comes not long after the group Wildlife and Countryside Link complained to legislators that the British countryside is viewed “as a ‘racist colonial white space.”

    Fitzwilliam Director Luke Syson said signage for images like Constable’s “suggest some new ways of looking, without insisting on them.” He scoffed at the notion the museum was becoming “woke.”

    MORE: British museum claims 3rd century Roman emperor was trans

    “Being inclusive and representative shouldn’t be controversial; it should be enriching,” Syson said. “I would love to think that there’s a way of telling these larger, more inclusive histories that doesn’t feel as if it requires a pushback from those who try to suggest that any interest at all in work by women artists or artists of colour – or subject matter that takes us into the world of LBGT culture – is being ‘radical chic’ or what would now be called ‘woke.’”

    From the story:

    A sign for the new Identity gallery informs visitors that portraits of uniformed and wealthy sitters “became vital tools in reinforcing the social order of a white ruling class, leaving very little room for representations of people of colour, the working classes or other marginalised people”.

    It adds that “portraits were often entangled, in complex ways, with British imperialism and the institution of transatlantic slavery”.

    Paintings in this space include Joseph Wright’s (1734-97) portrait of Richard FitzWilliam, who bequeathed £100,000 to fund what is now the Fitzwilliam Museum.

    Labelling for the portrait points out that FitzWilliam’s wealth “came from his grandfather, Sir Matthew Decker, who had amassed it in part through the transatlantic trade of enslaved African people”.

    The gallery also displays paintings intended to broaden representation with works by John Singer Sargent, the subject of “speculation he led a secret, queer life”, and works by artists in the Jewish diaspora, and a modern work by Joy Labinjo, the British-Nigerian artist.

    Sharon Heal, director of the London-based Museums Association, noted last year her organization had “doubled down on […] efforts to support the wider sector to address the legacy of empire, including racism, in museums.”

    Her group dedicated £20,000 (about $25,500) to anti-racism initiatives and made “decolonisation” a “central plank” of its Code of Ethics.
    Last edited by Azaran; 19th Mar 2024 at 10:15.

  15. #515
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2001
    Location: under God's grace
    According to the report, signage for such images comes not long after the group Wildlife and Countryside Link complained to legislators that the British countryside is viewed “as a ‘racist colonial white space.”
    It's very easy to get them mixed up, but here's some actual whitespace:
    and
    and of course the charming .

  16. #516
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    It wouldn't surprise me if that whole thing started with a 14 year old Tiktoker making a video with their very enlightened opinion on the British countryside, which then went viral
    Last edited by Azaran; 19th Mar 2024 at 11:36.

  17. #517
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    What anti-woke people hear: "British countryside is racist and white."

    What the academia is actually saying: "The way art has historically been commissioned cannot be separated from the power relations in the British colonial empire."

    If anyone's interested in the topic in more broad terms, I would suggest Imperial Leather: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the Colonial Contest by Anne McClintock as an excellent read.

  18. #518
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2001
    Location: under God's grace
    Quote Originally Posted by Starker View Post
    What anti-woke people hear: "British countryside is racist and white."
    Well according to that report, wildlife charities claim: "British countryside is a 'racist and colonial' white space."

  19. #519
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    That is a separate issue from the art thing that is just mixed into the article for some reason. This has something to do with the right to roam and people being able to enjoy equal access to nature. While I'm not familiar with land ownership laws and the right for public to access nature in the UK, in Estonia everyone is allowed to camp in forests, pick mushrooms and berries there, go fish in lakes or rivers with a fishing rod, or enjoy a walk on the beach. And people with private property in those places are obligated to allow access to them.

    I mean, I'm not familiar with the group that complained about minorities facing barriers accessing the countryside or their report, but on the first glance this seems like a valid concern and can't be dismissed as a fallacy or people just being "woke" for sake of "wokeness".
    Last edited by Starker; 21st Mar 2024 at 07:27.

  20. #520
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2001
    Location: under God's grace
    Ah, you're right. Yep, same here in Finland. It's called "jokamiehenoikeus", which means "freedom to roam".

  21. #521
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Quote Originally Posted by Qooper View Post
    It's very easy to get them mixed up, but here's some actual whitespace:
    and
    and of course the charming .
    Tell me you're not using Nameless Voice's Dark Theme without telling me.

  22. #522
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2020
    thecollegefix.com is a nonsense rag, Azaran. You don't do enough lateral reading Azaran, just blindly posting this outrage-bait.

    Scan the front page of their website, see what topics they're obsessed with. Then click on the tags below some articles, see what their overall "take" on any topic is.

    Like the tag "healthcare" should be about general healthcare topics on campus, right? A lot of different things you could write about for college kids, right? No, it's mostly stuff to mock DEI.

    https://www.thecollegefix.com/subject/healthcare-2/

    They're also climate deniers:

    https://www.thecollegefix.com/univer...nxiety-course/

    And give positive coverage to Covid vaccine skeptics:

    https://www.thecollegefix.com/new-mi...-steve-kirsch/

    --------------------------------------------

    And those labels in the museum are about the historical context of the pieces. The history behind those pieces is 100% meshed with stuff the British Empire was doing. not nice stuff.

    Those labels explaining what the context of the pieces is, those are important for people to understand how and why those pieces exist and were promoted.

    EDITED for brevity.

    First, this artwork didn't exist before the Industrial Revolution:

    https://westernarthistorybysuzy.word...al-revolution/

    Prior to the Industrial Revolution, the landscape genre was the lowest of the low. Landscape was included in art as background at best.
    Second, it came about because of the rise of the "class system", and the new affluent classes who exploited the labor of the working classes.

    During the Industrial Revolution, a new class system emerged where middle and upper classes became richer and had more leisure time. Advancement in train transport allowed for day trips out of the city into the country to enjoy the fresh air. John Constable responded to this change with his huge six-foot paintings, remembering and mourning the loss of simpler times.
    It wasn't for the poor sods who were dying down mines or rotting in factory conditions. It was for the new rising class of people getting rich from exploiting them and starting to pollute the planet. They got to go on the nice trips to the countryside and to look at paintings showing idealized views of a fantasy Britain before *they* started to fuck it up.

    Now's the point where you can quip "and they probably had slaves in India as the source of the pigments needed for the paint" - because that's exactly what you should expect the British Empire to be doing at this point in history. And, sure enough, they did:

    https://history.howstuffworks.com/wo...ory/indigo.htm

    For its part, England turned its attention to India for its indigo needs, where British colonists forced sharecroppers to grow indigo for hardly any money.
    So no, the placard wasn't even telling you a fraction of the fucked up shit that those paintings whitewash over.
    Last edited by Cipheron; 22nd Mar 2024 at 08:59.

  23. #523
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by Cipheron View Post
    And those labels in the museum are about the historical context of the pieces. The history behind those pieces is 100% meshed with stuff the British Empire was doing. not nice stuff.

    Those labels explaining what the context of the pieces is, those are important for people to understand how and why those pieces exist and were promoted.

    EDITED for brevity.

    First, this artwork didn't exist before the Industrial Revolution:

    https://westernarthistorybysuzy.word...al-revolution/


    Second, it came about because of the rise of the "class system", and the new affluent classes who exploited the labor of the working classes.


    It wasn't for the poor sods who were dying down mines or rotting in factory conditions. It was for the new rising class of people getting rich from exploiting them and starting to pollute the planet. They got to go on the nice trips to the countryside and to look at paintings showing idealized views of a fantasy Britain before *they* started to fuck it up.

    Now's the point where you can quip "and they probably had slaves in India as the source of the pigments needed for the paint" - because that's exactly what you should expect the British Empire to be doing at this point in history. And, sure enough, they did:

    https://history.howstuffworks.com/wo...ory/indigo.htm

    So no, the placard wasn't even telling you a fraction of the fucked up shit that those paintings whitewash over.
    Well then, I say let's put disclaimers on every pre-1960's piece of art and human invention. I'm sure we can dig up dirt on absolutely everything done prior to that time.

    The issue is not about understanding context. Those labels (and so much else nowadays) come with the implicit message that viewers can't enjoy the art for its own sake (on its beauty / aesthetic value), and must be made to feel ashamed for liking it.

    Also:
    “Paintings showing rolling English hills or lush French fields reinforced loyalty and pride towards a homeland.

    “The darker side of evoking this nationalist feeling is the implication that only those with a historical tie to the land have a right to belong.”


    Seems like inferring a whole lot of stuff that was not necessarily intended by the artist.

  24. #524
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Oh here's a good one from that same museum. Pointing out what the artist didn't represent

  25. #525
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    I don't really see any problems with the sign nor do I get a sense it's trying to guilt-trip anyone. Maybe certain museum visitors (though I suspect many of the people outraged by this hardly ever set a foot in an art museum) should just stop being such snowflakes and stop taking information about the era and the situation the art was produced in so personally.

    An exhibition is more than just a showing of pretty pictures. It can be centered around a certain theme or explore a particular topic. And the juxtaposition of industrialism with peaceful pastoral landscapes is more than fitting subject to explore, especially if you consider that this was going on at the same time: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swing_Riots.

    Furthermore, if there's anything that bothers me, it's rather the insistence of reactionaries that art (or any media really) should be consumed uncritically and never examined in a wider context (AKA the "Robocop isn't political" crowd).

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