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Thread: Random Architecture

  1. #126
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: The other Derry
    Caught me trying to be a know-it-all again

    Since we were talking about Canadian brutalist architecture earlier in the thread, I'll mention that I recently heard the Ontario Science Centre in Toronto might be torn down:
    https://www.archpaper.com/2023/05/ra...lopment-plans/

    The Ontario Science Centre was literally my favorite place in the whole world when I was in middle school. Here's a link with pictures that brought back some memories. It would be a trajedy to see it torn down; nothing like it could be built today.

    https://torontolife.com/city/thirty-...cience-centre/

  2. #127
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    Battleship Brutalist architecture because that building reminds me of the superstructure of a battleship or aircraft carrier.

  3. #128
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: The other Derry
    As I recall, my favorite thing there was the big CO2 laser described here:
    https://markcsele.ca/other-interests/my-science/

    Learning all the steps it took to start it up and then watching it cut through wood boards was pretty impressive to this kid.

    It's also where I met my first chat bot. They had an ELIZA program (or derivative) running on a DEC PDP-11 or VAX with a bunch of video terminals for people to use. On my second visit, the program crashed and dropped me to a prompt so I got to poke around a bit. It's where I got hooked on computers. It was also where I saw Powers of Ten for the first time. And so on..

  4. #129
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by heywood View Post
    Since we were talking about Canadian brutalist architecture earlier in the thread, I'll mention that I recently heard the Ontario Science Centre in Toronto might be torn down:
    https://www.archpaper.com/2023/05/ra...lopment-plans/

    The Ontario Science Centre was literally my favorite place in the whole world when I was in middle school. Here's a link with pictures that brought back some memories. It would be a trajedy to see it torn down; nothing like it could be built today.

    https://torontolife.com/city/thirty-...cience-centre/
    It should be preserved, but there's a bit of poetic justice here, considering how many nice 19th century buildings were destroyed without a second thought, to be replaced by brutalist ones in the 1960s

  5. #130
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Jacques Couelle, Sculpture house, 1962






  6. #131
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: The other Derry
    I guess I'm less sensitive to that because I can't think of examples here in the US where we lost buildings of historical or architectural significance in building our brutalist eye sores. Probably because of the age of this country, we haven't lost a lot of significant buildings at all outside of our older cities like New York and Chicago, where we keep building generic high rises designed to last 50 years. The most controversial brutalist construction project I can think of is Boston City Hall, but the controversy is all about how bad it turned out, not the urban blight it replaced. Most of the brutalist buildings I can think of here didn't replace anything.

  7. #132
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Yeah I think it mostly happened in the UK and nordic countries

  8. #133
    New Member
    Registered: Sep 2023
    Location: Nevada

    Strange elevator in Czech Republic


  9. #134
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: 27430 Cells
    There's a Tom Scott video about those lifts where he leaves a GoPro in one of them as it goes over the top:
    Last edited by R Soul; 30th Nov 2023 at 11:05.

  10. #135
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    That looks fun.

  11. #136
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2001
    Location: under God's grace
    We have our own Paternoster lifts at our Parliament House here in Finland. They keep our politicians alert and nimble. In fact there was this joke about our Paavo Väyrynen, where, as soon as he heard there was a minister's position open, he appeared at the scene riding one of these lifts:


  12. #137
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    Quote Originally Posted by heywood View Post
    I guess I'm less sensitive to that because I can't think of examples here in the US where we lost buildings of historical or architectural significance in building our brutalist eye sores. Probably because of the age of this country, we haven't lost a lot of significant buildings at all outside of our older cities like New York and Chicago, where we keep building generic high rises designed to last 50 years. The most controversial brutalist construction project I can think of is Boston City Hall, but the controversy is all about how bad it turned out, not the urban blight it replaced. Most of the brutalist buildings I can think of here didn't replace anything.
    Perhaps aided by the fact that the USA avoided the demolition phase of Adolph Hitler's urban renewal plans.


  13. #138
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    I've recently been impressed by these new Bidenville cathedrals that rise up majestically against the city skyline. Undoubtedly tastefully appointed interiors are protected by alluring outdoor pursuit blue, gray, and yellow all-weather cladding. Built in spacious city parks and along main city thoroughfares commute times are sure to be very low. Move in today!


  14. #139
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicker View Post
    Perhaps aided by the fact that the USA avoided the demolition phase of Adolph Hitler's urban renewal plans.
    They managed to avoid Brutalism in Warsaw (one of the most tragic examples of Nazi cultural genocide) and reconstructed most of it faithfully



    Dresden, leveled by the Allies as revenge, also rose from the ashes


  15. #140
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    That is so amazing the reconstruction they did in Warsaw. Dresden was a war crime. The War was a fucking war crime.

    Europe had a deep architectural history to draw on. After WW2 they had only a limited and savagely blank canvas on which to work. After WW2 the USA's infrastructure and cities were unscathed. The war dividend drove expansion and the invention of the nuclear family drove demand. Driving demands roads. The suburbs were invented. Sears Catalogue Homes. More roads.

    Domesticated Brutalism. Brutal to the landscape, certainly.

  16. #141
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: The other Derry
    Yeah, here in North America, the McMansion has done more to destroy the character of places than any previous architectural style.

  17. #142
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    The old (by West Coast standards) character homes along our coast are being replaced by glass blocks. Architectural narcissism. It's all about the experience of the people living inside and zero shits given for everybody else. Even neighbourhoods with architectural standards are under assault. While the glass boxes are technically, each a unique and original design, they still manage to look like they fell off of an assembly line.

  18. #143
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    New gothic cathedral themed studio in Toronto. Everything here (arch work, &c) is newly built





    Video tour

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