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Thread: Random Architecture

  1. #151
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: The other Derry
    Quote Originally Posted by Azaran View Post
    Cayala, a new neighbourhood development in Guatemala, built in the last decade





    I'm undecided on that one. Like a lot of modern architecture, it looks a bit sterile. Perhaps too much whitewash. The building that looks like a Greek temple seems out of place.

  2. #152
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    Quote Originally Posted by heywood View Post
    The cadet chapel above is spectacular in person, and it's perfectly suited for the USAF academy and inspiring to the people who attend service there.
    It's certainly impressive but there's a lot of expensive roof leakage issues most likely due to the unique design. It cost 3.5 million to build and now it's going to cost around 150 million to renovate. They do pump through a lot of cadets though so it's definitely getting used. Due to it's stealthy design I had missed it on Google maps for years before spotting it.

  3. #153
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    Quote Originally Posted by Harvester View Post
    I mean I don’t want to be found dead at a football stadium on Sunday or anytime but I’m fine with them existing and people enjoying themselves there, despite the damage football hooligans are causing.
    Let me know when football hooligans start a global holy war.

    I hope that chapel wasn't built with tax payer's money.

  4. #154
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    I'm undecided on that one. Like a lot of modern architecture, it looks a bit sterile. Perhaps too much whitewash. The building that looks like a Greek temple seems out of place.
    It is a bit Cecil B. DeMille. I like the cohesion and the open, public spaces. Perhaps with some more ground level decoration and greenery it will seem less sterile.

  5. #155
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicker View Post
    Let me know when football hooligans start a global holy war.

    I hope that chapel wasn't built with tax payer's money.
    The 20th century regimes where religious beliefs were strictly forbidden and believers were persecuted caused more casualties than all the religious wars in history combined. Stalin, Mao, Pol Pot, the Kims, etc. I know that atheism is not strictly the cause of those atrocities, I'm just saying that people will always find an excuse to bash each others brains in, if it's not religion then it will be political systems, economic injustice, a certain philosophy, ethnicity, tribal conflicts, the simple lust for power etc.

    Also you didn't answer my question, what is it to you if I want to peacefully worship on Sunday where I'm not harming anyone and it inspires me/us to be a better person? Why do you want to take that away from peaceful believers like me? I agree by the way that it's a beautiful church. There are a lot of beautiful churches (the Notre Dame just got rebuilt, also with the support of many French atheists who find it an inspiring landmark), beautiful religious classical compositions, beautiful religious paintings and statues, etc. Atheism doesn't seem to inspire great art thus far.

    If you want a strict comparison between Dutch hooligans and believers, by the way, fine: hooligans are detracting from society, Dutch churches (also mosques to a lesser extent) are doing a lot of good public service not just for their own congregationists but for the whole of Dutch society. It's almost bedtime so I'm not going to list examples with links and all, but the activities of Dutch religious places of worship have a net benefit to society while hooligans do not.
    Last edited by Harvester; 14th Apr 2024 at 17:09.

  6. #156
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: The other Derry
    Quote Originally Posted by mxleader View Post
    It's certainly impressive but there's a lot of expensive roof leakage issues most likely due to the unique design. It cost 3.5 million to build and now it's going to cost around 150 million to renovate. They do pump through a lot of cadets though so it's definitely getting used. Due to it's stealthy design I had missed it on Google maps for years before spotting it.
    You made me Google it and it's now up to $220 million due to the asbestos found. Not worth it.
    In that sense, it's like a lot of modern architecture: designed to last in the architect's mind, but using unproven construction methods that require reverse engineering at considerable expense to repair. A lot of Frank Lloyd Wright homes suffer from that too.

  7. #157
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Quote Originally Posted by Harvester View Post
    Atheism doesn't seem to inspire great art thus far.
    I'm not fundamentally agreeing with Nicker's take, because the thing about religion is that it's a complex set of things to consider (on balance, I prefer to not be religious but I have no problems with those who find faith helpful in being better without harming themselves or anyone else) -- but this isn't fair. The requirement to believe in god is independent of a person's ability to create great things. It's certainly helped with some beautiful works of art, but I counter that the body of stories and art and great works of engineering by people indifferent to god, questioning 'god', or declaring that god does not exist are at the very least their equal, just in a different mode.

    Here's a wikipedia list of some artists
    .
    Last edited by Sulphur; 14th Apr 2024 at 23:59.

  8. #158
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    Yes, that comment was too snarky, I agree and apologize, I was lying in bed and thinking about how I shouldn't have phrased it that way. I myself enjoy many works of art created by atheists and benefit from the fruits of their scientific labor. But I do take offense to tiresome memes like 'science flies us to the moon, religion flies us into buildings' because those meme posters forget that religious people are fully active in all levels and disciplines of science.

  9. #159
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: The other Derry
    Funny you should say Cecil B. DeMille, because at first glance it looked more like a movie or video game set than a real place to me, kind of soul-less.

  10. #160
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2000
    Location: Bicester Oxfordshire UK
    A rare place of worship, it has areas for most religions.

  11. #161
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    Yes, that comment was too snarky, I agree and apologize, I was lying in bed and thinking about how I shouldn't have phrased it that way.
    And I apologise, to you and sundry, for diverting a discussion about architecture into one about religion.

    Not withdrawing anything I said... but.... I won't say anything more ITT.

  12. #162
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicker View Post
    And I apologise, to you and sundry, for diverting a discussion about architecture into one about religion.
    To be fair, religion has had, and continues to have, a strong influence on many architectural works.

  13. #163
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicker View Post
    And I apologise, to you and sundry, for diverting a discussion about architecture into one about religion.

    Not withdrawing anything I said... but.... I won't say anything more ITT.
    Apologies aren't necessary, you're entitled to your opinion. I agree, let's not derail the thread any further, it's an interesting thread that should stay on topic.

  14. #164
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Chateau de Guédelon, France. This is a new castle, still under construction, built entirely using medieval techniques






  15. #165
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    That's definitely on my bucket list to visit if I ever get to France. I first saw that one on Secrets of the Castle. That would be some brutally difficult work but totally worth it.

  16. #166
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: The other Derry
    I'll pass. It has no history and its features serve no purpose. It would be like going to see a replica of classical sculpture.

  17. #167
    I disagree on the lack of purpose. If it was a Disney-style plywood and stucco "recreation", I'd dismiss it as a soulless project but by employing genuine medieval techniques, sometimes reinventing them from scratch (which okay maybe is not technically genuine but you get my point) one can learn a lot about life in these times and how things worked etc. The entire ecology of a medieval castle was recreated around it, it's not just the structure: there's a market, artisans, forges, bakeries etc. I think it's extremely interesting and if you have kids in their "knights and dragons" phase, probably a great idea for an outing that's both educational and fun.

  18. #168
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by heywood View Post
    I'll pass. It has no history and its features serve no purpose. It would be like going to see a replica of classical sculpture.
    Which brings up the issue of aesthetic vs ascribed value. If you didn't know it was a replica, you'd see it with different eyes and appreciate its beauty. But then your perception of it immediately changes if it's revealed as a replica. I have several reproductions of 17th century paintings in my apartment; the fact that I know they're not the originals doesn't change the fact that I love and value them, and they enrich my decor.

    If I had enough money, I'd hire an interior decorator to make my place look like a baroque manor, wallpaper, wainscoting, ceiling molding and everything. I believe in the objective timelessness of aesthetics

    And +1 on what Rachel said.

  19. #169
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    Quote Originally Posted by heywood View Post
    I'll pass. It has no history and its features serve no purpose. It would be like going to see a replica of classical sculpture.
    What features are you referring to that serve no purpose?

    I totally get the history part of things and that makes sense. For me though it would be awesome to visit a castle that's under construction and accessible. It's also a great way to learn old building methods and test them without damaging actual historic structures.

  20. #170
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    That castle is a living window into our past. If you haven't seen the Secrets of the Castle series which mxleader mentioned, check it out.


  21. #171
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    Yep, it's a great series. The three of them also are great in the Tudor, Victorian and Edwardian farm series, and the steam locomotive series. I can't find the earlier Tales from the Green Valley on any streaming service so I'm guessing it was only on VHS or DVD. But I digress.

  22. #172

  23. #173
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2003
    Location: Mossad Time Machine
    After visiting the local RSPB nature reserve on Saturday, I popped into Conwy Castle for the first time since I was a child. After more than 700 years, it is still largely intact.

    It is strikingly well integrated into its environment. Of course, castles were situated in places precisely because the location bestowed various advantages, nevertheless this required some serious engineering.



    You see modern walls with crumbling cement, things don't seem to be built to last any more. These walls are in their eighth century of life and are still solid as a rock. The thickness is a factor, but they also employed the old Roman technique of using seawater in the mortar, which gives it incredible strength.



    A little credit, however, to the (relatively) modern architects who designed the railway bridge that runs alongside the castle. They made a decent fist of getting it to fit into its surroundings.


  24. #174
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by SD View Post
    They made a decent fist of getting it to fit into its surroundings.[/IMG]

    By contrast, here is a crappy 'restoration' of a Spanish medieval castle that anything but fits



    Some people think this is a blunder, but the truth is more sinister. There's a (perverse in my opinion) modern architecture doctrine that many countries use, that dictates that restorations of older buildings must be discordant, obviously modern and inharmonious, to avoid 'confusion' with the original parts of the building.

  25. #175
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2024
    Location: Egyptian Afterlife
    In case of earthquakes, avoid castles.
    Just saying.
    Even a small 5.0 Richter scale can be devastating on solid non flexible structures.

    An earthquake can happen anywhere. However, the vast majority of earthquakes occur at the boundaries between tectonic plates.

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