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Thread: Random Architecture

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo

    Random Architecture

    Here's a thread for random architecture images and conversation because it's too specific to be in the Random Thoughts thread.

    Inside the outside of the Phoenix Art Museum.


  2. #2
    The Necromancer
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Thanks mxleader

    Abandoned 19th century Portuguese house



    Japanese apartment


  3. #3
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    There's a stark contrast with the blockhouse cookie cutter condo's and the leaning cone of shame that is the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Washington.



  4. #4
    The Necromancer
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by mxleader View Post
    blockhouse cookie cutter condo's
    They're also taking over up here. They all pretty much look the same. I imagine they're more cost effective and cheaper to build

    Some works by Jeff Shelton, a Californian Neo-Art Nouveau designer, and one of my favourite modern architects, known for his bold and whimsical style






  5. #5
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    That's some crazy looking material on the outside.

  6. #6
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2003
    Location: Mossad Time Machine
    I don't take enough photos of buildings, and I should because I sure need the practice.

    This is a church constructed in the Byzantine style just around the corner from my mother-in-law's house in Lytham, Lancashire.



    Basilica of Santa Maria in Elche, Spain.



    The Chinese Arch here in Liverpool, threshold to the oldest Chinatown in Europe.


  7. #7
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: 27430 Cells
    I'm sure the fist one will look nicer once the art is put in (or before it was removed), but in the photo it looks like one of those rather sad pictures of an old public swimming baths which was doing well up to the 1990s/early 2000s but has since closed.

    2nd one: shame to see old houses like that decaying, but there's often something interesting about watching nature starting to reclaim things.

    The third one is soul crushing, probably designed by someone who wears a turtleneck sweater and thinks skinny trousers are a good thing. Who thought the thinly painted tarmac look was suitable for a cooking and dining environment?

    The leaning cone just looks like the foundations gave way like in Pisa and they made the best of a bad job, or it's the abandoned site of a prototype rocket comissioned by an Elon Musk fanboy.

    I like the bright colourful ones by Jeff Shelton, along with their traditional features. Looks like he wanted to enjoy his work and for humans to enjoy being there.

  8. #8
    The Necromancer
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by R Soul View Post
    The third one is soul crushing, probably designed by someone who wears a turtleneck sweater and thinks skinny trousers are a good thing. Who thought the thinly painted tarmac look was suitable for a cooking and dining environment?
    I can't stand most modernist architecture, but there's something about concrete interiors that appeals to me, especially darker ones

  9. #9
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    Quote Originally Posted by Azaran View Post
    I can't stand most modernist architecture, but there's something about concrete interiors that appeals to me, especially darker ones
    Maybe it's cliche but my favorite modern architecture architect (R.I.P.) is Louis Kahn:

    Salk Institute:


  10. #10
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    Not me. Concrete rooms give me a sense of unease. I immediately start looking for the exit as if I'm in jail or a rape room.

    I love that little Hobbit style window in the house with the stairs. And for me it's wood that gives me wood. I like the warm feel of wood and windows and bookshelves with a couch to lie and read. Also Hobbit houses are energy efficient and only require a facade if mostly underground. Good for the coming scortched earth times ahead. Though why build one if you aren't going to make the interior like this?


  11. #11
    The Necromancer
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by Tocky View Post
    Not me. Concrete rooms give me a sense of unease. I immediately start looking for the exit as if I'm in jail or a rape room.
    I'm probably in the minority, but I feel like that in modern all-white cookie-cutter scandi interiors, can't stand it. What most people find airy and cheerful, I find oppressive and dreadry, like I'm in a hospital. I'll take either a nice wall colour, paneling or wallpaper, or alternatively a dark concrete interior. I had my living room painted pastel yellow, with a sticker trim on top, and dark brown doors - I get a joyful, cozy vibe from it


    Quote Originally Posted by Tocky View Post
    I love that little Hobbit style window in the house with the stairs. And for me it's wood that gives me wood. I like the warm feel of wood and windows and bookshelves with a couch to lie and read. Also Hobbit houses are energy efficient and only require a facade if mostly underground. Good for the coming scortched earth times ahead. Though why build one if you aren't going to make the interior like this?

    Love this. I'm especially fond of dark wood, Tudor style wainscoting




  12. #12
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by mxleader View Post
    Salk Institute:
    My wife works there.

    Dresden singing pipes:

  13. #13
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    That looks cool. How noisy is it?

  14. #14
    The Necromancer
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Rancho TehuŠn, Mexico. Built in 2021. The inside could use more colour, but love the outer stonework






  15. #15
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    It looks nice but, yeah, it's pretty colorless. Living in desert is pretty dull since nearly everyone wants their houses to blend into the landscape.

  16. #16
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    Transitional architecture can be interesting and fun. But here we see the early town of Leavenworth when it was developed as a typical American gold mining town. As the town grew the gold ran out, and then transitioned into a forestry industry. When all the raw material industries dried up, and the railroad rerouted it's terminal, the town was in danger of becoming a ghost town. Sometime in the 1960's the town leadership got the bright idea of turning the town into a Bavarian village to draw tourism dollars. Given it's setting with the alpine backdrop it was picture perfect. Of course it's wildly popular today and one of my favorite places to visit. But it is a complete facade. A fake. But it's such a good facsimile that you can't help but love it and suspend disbelief. Oddly enough there is an amazing south American cuisine restaurant called South that is located in the North part of town, and is nearly impossible to spot from the street. Even the Starbucks and McDonald's blend in fairly well.






  17. #17
    The Necromancer
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by mxleader View Post
    Of course it's wildly popular today and one of my favorite places to visit. But it is a complete facade. A fake. But it's such a good facsimile that you can't help but love it and suspend disbelief.
    Looks lovely.

    To me it matters more how buildings look, than whether they're authentic or not. Most humans have a primal attraction to ornament and architectural decoration that supersedes any concerns of 'authenticity'.

    Another revival I love is Ch‚teau Louis XIV, created as a replica of an 18th century French castle. I don't like that it's owned by a Saudi prince, but it's a breathtaking building





    ]

  18. #18
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    Strange that French royal buildings are being restored and replicated by royalty from another country. You can cut off the head but it regrows like a paramecium.

  19. #19
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: The other Derry
    To me that's too ostentatious. Just looking at it makes me cringe.

    On the other hand, I really dig Jeff Shelton, though I wouldn't call him a modern architect. I think bright colors and eclectic decorations are great for the desert. Normally, I'm not that into art nouveau, but it works for the setting and his homes are fun.

    Rancho TehuŠn is nice too. Here's a desert-inspired house that I was going to bring up before the thread split because it has a GD video:



    https://sustainablehouseday.com/list...rground-house/

    I was also going to say something about concrete interiors. I like the look of the ones you posted Azaran, but I strongly suspect they will be uncomfortable to live in because of the acoustics. There needs to be more sound absorption, to reduce hard echos and get the reverberation time down to the level that people are used to and comfortable with. There is a strong relationship between the acoustics of a room and how cozy it feels, which is a point lost on most residential architects practicing today I think.

    Finally, one more contribution for today. I found this while trying to find a pic of the Steel's Creek underground house. From Vegas (of course):



    https://www.realtor.com/news/unique-...use-las-vegas/
    Last edited by heywood; 31st Aug 2023 at 09:52.

  20. #20
    The Necromancer
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by heywood View Post
    Here's a desert-inspired house that I was going to bring up before the thread split because it has a GD video:


    That looks fantastic, love the living room and brick arches


  21. #21
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    "Can we move the couch?"

    "Well... No."

    From Vegas (of course)
    Las Vegas: where the real outside sucks so bad we have to make fake outsides inside almost everywhere.

  22. #22
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    Quote Originally Posted by Pyrian View Post
    "Can we move the couch?"

    "Well... No."
    My ex-wife would lose her mind if she couldn't rearrange the couch.

  23. #23
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    Paradise Valley, Arizona. I like it but these newer builds but they all seem to blend architectural styles from Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Kahn and whoever built the Brady Bunch living room. Nothing feels original.







    Last edited by mxleader; 31st Aug 2023 at 12:12.

  24. #24
    The Necromancer
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by mxleader View Post
    Paradise Valley, Arizona. I like it but these newer builds but they all seem to blend architectural styles from Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Kahn and whoever built the Brady Bunch living room. Nothing feels original.

    Looks deconstructivist.

    Wolpa synagogue, rebuilt in 2015, Poland. The original was in Belarus, and was burned down by the Nazis in the 1940's




  25. #25
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    Interesting how they used wood to build something that looks like it would normally be built from stone and brick. It also has that American frontier blockhouse feel with the siding, mixed with lodge style construction. There's a lot going on with that one but it's made subtle because of the raw rough cut timbers. I'm also guessing that the original was a tinderbox that probably took very little effort to torch.

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