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Thread: Kill the Turkey and Qué the Christmas Music

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo

    Kill the Turkey and Qué the Christmas Music

    Sometimes I forget that this forum is a international one. I was about to make a post in the What Are You Listening To thread but then the tiny gears in my mouse brain started spinning ... All the gears just spin independently though because most of the teeth are missing....

    In the US we have this tradition and tendency to switch to the Christmas holiday right after Thanksgiving. Before the official change to the current method of determining the Thanksgiving holiday on the calendar in 1939 and when Coca-Cola redefined Christmas things were less precise. But fast forward to today without going into the long history of how Thanksgiving in the US came about. Interestingly though the date of Thanksgiving around the American Civil War superseded the Evacuation holiday from when the British finally fled from the US at the end of the Revolutionary war.

    That all said when do you's peoples kick off your Christmas holiday if you do such a thing?
    Last edited by mxleader; 4th Dec 2023 at 23:29.

  2. #2
    New Member
    Registered: Nov 2023
    The kickoff for the Christmas holiday varies widely around the world, often tied to cultural or religious traditions. In the United States, many people start celebrating right after Thanksgiving. In the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth countries, the Christmas season traditionally begins with Advent in late November. In some European countries like Germany and Austria, the Christmas season starts with Saint Nicholas' Day on December 6th. However, it's important to note that these are general trends and individual practices can vary greatly.

  3. #3
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    A momentous occasion: our first ChatGPT bot.

  4. #4
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    Quote Originally Posted by Sulphur View Post
    A momentous occasion: our first ChatGPT bot.
    I'll mark it on the calendar for next year's celebration.

  5. #5
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Location: Canuckistan GWN
    Yarrrr. Bumhug!

    Wait until December before invoking the "C" word, please.

    How can it be a special time of year when it starts the day after Halloween and lasts until mid January?

  6. #6
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: The other Derry
    Another US perspective here. When I was a kid in the 70s and 80s, our first thoughts of Christmas arrived in September with the Sears Wish Book. I'm sure some people here remember that. But Black Friday wasn't a thing yet, and in my area we didn't see decorations going up until the beginning of December. I was raised as a Congregationalist, and for me the service on the first day of Advent was the start of Christmas season. The church would be decorated, the number of families in attendance would swell, we'd start singing seasonal hymns, and everybody would hang around long afterward chatting and catching up while kids played.

    I spent the 1990s in college, grad school, and military service. I didn't pay much attention to Christmas until I was traveling to meet family, or briefly when attending a holiday party. But I couldn't help but notice the increasing commercialization through that decade and the rise of Black Friday and making the whole thing about deal shopping. Meanwhile, nativity scenes and the like were disappearing as most of suburban America started to brush aside the Christian elements of the holiday.

    Then I married into a family obsessed with holiday decorations and wrapping as many boxes as possible, which made me hate Christmas for years until I had kids. Before kids, I left it mostly to my wife to meet her family's shopping expectations. With kids, I appreciate the holiday more, especially Christmas morning at home. The kids get me to start right after Thanksgiving every year by cutting down and decorating a tree. I also handle most of the kids presents and cook a special Christmas Eve meal for just us. We avoid Thanksgiving weekend shopping like the plague. I still dread the incessant holiday music everywhere that starts the day after Thanksgiving, all the wasteful buying and associated trash, having to eat another overcooked roasted Turkey as the celebratory meal, and the aftermath of unwanted gifts to get rid of. But I like having a week off to stay home and play with the kids and cook.

    The only two other countries I've spent a Christmas season in are Australia and England, and they're just like what I'm used to in the US minus the Black Friday madness.
    Last edited by heywood; 27th Nov 2023 at 17:06.

  7. #7
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    When I was teaching Myanmar law students, the Christian students (from the Kachin, Karenni, & Keren ethnic groups) would kick things off on midnight of December 1, which they call "Sweet December", by singing carols at midnight, in our case to the only other group on the campus they could carol to, the Buddhist students trying to sleep through it, with a few of them even covering their heads with their pillows. I found the whole scene very amusing.

    The school generally let the students do their own customs for the different holidays and events, but the reactions of the other students varied from very engaged to curious to outright annoyed. XD

  8. #8
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicker View Post
    Yarrrr. Bumhug!

    Wait until December before invoking the "C" word, please.

    How can it be a special time of year when it starts the day after Halloween and lasts until mid January?
    If everyday is special than no day is special.


    Quote Originally Posted by heywood View Post
    Another US perspective here. When I was a kid in the 70s and 80s, our first thoughts of Christmas arrived in September with the Sears Wish Book. I'm sure some people here remember that. But Black Friday wasn't a thing yet, and in my area we didn't see decorations going up until the beginning of December. I was raised as a Congregationalist, and for me the service on the first day of Advent was the start of Christmas season. The church would be decorated, the number of families in attendance would swell, we'd start singing seasonal hymns, and everybody would hang around long afterward chatting and catching up while kids played.

    I spent the 1990s in college, grad school, and military service. I didn't pay much attention to Christmas until I was traveling to meet family, or briefly when attending a holiday party. But I couldn't help but notice the increasing commercialization through that decade and the rise of Black Friday and making the whole thing about deal shopping. Meanwhile, nativity scenes and the like were disappearing as most of suburban America started to brush aside the Christian elements of the holiday.
    I recall the Sears catalogs from then but my family was experiencing a bit of an economic hardship due to an injury a parent sustained so we were more of a pick out something from the Montgomery Ward catalog and see if you could find it at the Goodwill.


    Quote Originally Posted by demagogue View Post
    When I was teaching Myanmar law students, the Christian students (from the Kachin, Karenni, & Keren ethnic groups) would kick things off on midnight of December 1, which they call "Sweet December", by singing carols at midnight, in our case to the only other group on the campus they could carol to, the Buddhist students trying to sleep through it, with a few of them even covering their heads with their pillows. I found the whole scene very amusing.

    The school generally let the students do their own customs for the different holidays and events, but the reactions of the other students varied from very engaged to curious to outright annoyed. XD
    That's pretty funny.

  9. #9
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicker View Post
    How can it be a special time of year when it starts the day after Halloween and lasts until mid January?
    At the stores, Thanksgiving is an afterthought except for maybe the frozen turkey section. Christmas starts November 1st, and continues until Valentine's Day starts on December 26th.

  10. #10
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2010
    Location: Post Glacial
    If you are in the USA, or a country that has a Costco, then you know it starts in mid July. And yes, Easter starts in January. Halloween in late August. Got to spend spend spend! Merry/Happy Christmas, or other holiday of your choice

  11. #11
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    Quote Originally Posted by bjack View Post
    If you are in the USA, or a country that has a Costco, then you know it starts in mid July. And yes, Easter starts in January. Halloween in late August. Got to spend spend spend! Merry/Happy Christmas, or other holiday of your choice
    I did see some Christmas stuff at Costco this year pretty damn early.

  12. #12
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2001
    Location: under God's grace
    Quote Originally Posted by josephpayne View Post
    The kickoff for the Christmas holiday varies widely around the world, often tied to cultural or religious traditions. In the United States, many people start celebrating right after Thanksgiving. In the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth countries, the Christmas season traditionally begins with Advent in late November. In some European countries like Germany and Austria, the Christmas season starts with Saint Nicholas' Day on December 6th. However, it's important to note that these are general trends and individual practices can vary greatly.
    It's fascinating how diverse the kickoff to the Christmas season can be across different cultures! It really shows how traditions and customs can shape our celebrations. Do you have a favorite tradition or way of starting the holiday season where you're from?

  13. #13
    New Member
    Registered: Nov 2023
    Quote Originally Posted by Qooper View Post
    It's fascinating how diverse the kickoff to the Christmas season can be across different cultures! It really shows how traditions and customs can shape our celebrations. Do you have a favorite tradition or way of starting the holiday season where you're from?
    I once had the opportunity to celebrate Christmas with friends from Poland. It was a really interesting experience, Christmas markets where they sold all kinds of goodies, warm beer and wine with spices. They also have a cool tradition of putting 12 dishes on the festive table. So far, I liked it the most, at least because I didn't have to celebrate with my relatives, who always come to my parents for the holidays.

  14. #14
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    I dated a woman once who had lived in the UK for a while for school and brought with her some of the English Christmas traditions like the Christmas crackers and wearing those tissue paper crowns at the dinner table. At the same time her and her family were of German descent so there was a lot of German dishes and Landjager for snacks. However, it wasn't that much fun to take part in because they were far too serious about it and so every minute was uncomfortable and awkward but interesting.

  15. #15
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    I will be putting up Christmas decorations this weekend. This Christmas will be memorable in either a good or a bad way because around Christmas (exact date not sure, the 24th of 27th or something like that) I'll go on a date with a woman I met online. Looking forward to it but it's kind of scary as well, we really like each other online but we'll have to see if we have a similarly good vibe in real life. She's from Belgium so I can only go there or she can only come to me on weekends and in a month like December both our weekends are already booked. So the Christmas holiday was the earliest time we could plan a date.

    What's the big deal, a date, you ask? Try dating and experiencing the emotional rollercoaster of falling in love when you have autism. Still, our connection is so strong that I'm giving it a proper shot.

  16. #16
    ZylonBane
    Registered: Sep 2000
    Location: ZylonBane
    Quote Originally Posted by mxleader View Post
    Que the Christmas Music
    Calm down there Manuel.

  17. #17
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    Quote Originally Posted by ZylonBane View Post
    Calm down there Manuel.
    I can't help it! I'm just so excited for Christmas! I have no idea why though...

  18. #18
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2009
    Location: The Spiraling Sea

  19. #19
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2001
    Location: under God's grace
    Quote Originally Posted by Harvester View Post
    I will be putting up Christmas decorations this weekend. This Christmas will be memorable in either a good or a bad way because around Christmas (exact date not sure, the 24th of 27th or something like that) I'll go on a date with a woman I met online. Looking forward to it but it's kind of scary as well, we really like each other online but we'll have to see if we have a similarly good vibe in real life. She's from Belgium so I can only go there or she can only come to me on weekends and in a month like December both our weekends are already booked. So the Christmas holiday was the earliest time we could plan a date.
    That's awesome Harvester!

    What's the big deal, a date, you ask? Try dating and experiencing the emotional rollercoaster of falling in love when you have autism. Still, our connection is so strong that I'm giving it a proper shot.
    I've been in the same boat, I'm pretty sure I have asperger's syndrome (undiagnosed but it's pretty clear), so I know what you're talking about. I'm rooting for you dude I don't know if rooting is the correct expression in this context. In Finnish we'd say "pitää peukkuja jollekin", which means to keep one's thumbs up for someone.

  20. #20
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    Thank you Qooper, you know how confusing this stuff is for autistic people. It's like when I'm interacting with her it goes well, we hit it off great, but in other moments the emotions are overwhelming. At least with this woman I'm not overanalyzing whether she really likes me because she makes it clear that she does and she also makes it clear she sees me as more than "just a friend". Last night we did a video call for the first time and that too went very well, she said so too and we went to bed later than we planned because we had such a great time. But she said she slept like a baby afterwards while I'm still overstimulated afterwards and was awake for like an hour and a half (but slept well after that). I'm a pretty social person but I need time to unwind after intense social interactions.

  21. #21
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    Whatever autism is I have the opposite and I did okay with women back in my day but I have to say I think you beat me Harvester. You have decked quite a few halls since I've known you. And I don't think you will have to keep any mistletoe in your pocket either. I know you are looking for the one and not the many but enjoy the journey. Each is like a different kind of gem. Absolutely nothing has to happen. Just enjoy the moment. Ha. I'm giving you advice. Well, be prepared to put tinsel on that tree.

    Okay, now that I have murdered Christmas I just want to say heywood brought me back. Yeah, we circled what we wanted in the Sears catalogue, even put our initial beside it for our parents to know. A perfect childhood. I have several early seventies catalogues if anyone wants to see pics. But what I wanted to say was that I had a perfect day. I woke as my wife crawled back into bed and made her eyes roll back four times. Got up and did laundry, made coffee, put Christmas lights on the house, ate a great breakfast my wife prepared, and set out to shop. I knocked out several on the present list. A large garish as hell topaz ring for one of my granddaughters while I caught up with Josh at the antique store. A set of vintage silver and turquois earrings by Navaho Tom Jack for my wife. Other stuff for others. The Mcrib is back and got some. Went to the Toccopola Christmas parade. My daughter won first prize for her float. Took pics and some of mom with all the grands and greats. Sat with a neighbor who is special and have wondered how he is doing since his mom died. Told him I'm just across the pasture. Made him promise to call me if he needs anything. Hope I wasn't insensitive because I don't know how it is to be that way. Went home and posted the pics on facebook. Massaged my wifes scalp with her head in my lap as we watched A Christmas Carrol, the one with George C. Scot that we favor and A Garfield Christmas. Talked to Kev in messaging about music and how I wished I hadn't sold my Le Mans sport convertible and showed him a pic of the one I will buy if I win the lottery. Came here and read this stuff while on my way to a nice wine buzz. Sweet and complete.

    Merry Christmas and to all a good night.

  22. #22
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    I've been researching Tom Jack. He is a Navajo born of the Salt tribe in Arizona in 1948. He worked for the railroad until he was struck by lightening in 1979. He then was healed by his medicine man father and apprenticed to a silversmith. Much of his jewelry contains lightening bolts but he also incorporates Hopi designs from his great grandmother. I did my term paper on Hopi peyote rituals. The piece I bought was for it's beauty but to know his story is such sweet icing on the cake. When my wife and I had visited the stone tower of Mary Colter on the Grand Canyon rim we met a native who sold jewelry there. I hadn't the funds to buy a piece then and hurt for the lack. I always want to buy my wife beautiful things. This rectifies that in spades. I love a story and Tom Jack has one I love.


  23. #23
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2002
    Location: In the flesh.
    Since I mentioned the Le Mans I want it wouldn't hurt to show you a picture of it. I owned this once in a baby shit yellow. It should have been my car for life and I will always ache for having sold it. Mygod is there any car more beautiful? Even the Auburn Boat-Tail Speedster of 36 which is my second favorite comes nowhere near it. People are wonderful and of paramount importance but I can't help but feel it is okay to love some few things as well.



    I've been through Tampa. I've thought of going down to visit this beast. It could even be the one I owned restored the way I should have done. Fucking money. I hate that I don't have it only for certain and very particular reasons. If I were ever to be selfish about one thing in life this is it. Look at it. There is nothing more beautiful on earth in metal form. It would be the first thing I would buy if I had 56 K. I don't want a large house or power over others. I only want this and a sunny day to drive.

  24. #24
    Member
    Registered: Mar 2005
    Location: Netherlands
    Quote Originally Posted by Tocky View Post
    Whatever autism is I have the opposite and I did okay with women back in my day but I have to say I think you beat me Harvester. You have decked quite a few halls since I've known you. And I don't think you will have to keep any mistletoe in your pocket either. I know you are looking for the one and not the many but enjoy the journey. Each is like a different kind of gem. Absolutely nothing has to happen. Just enjoy the moment. Ha. I'm giving you advice. Well, be prepared to put tinsel on that tree.
    Thank you Tocky, that's nice of you to say, but I seriously doubt I'm better with women than you were back in your day. But I'm really enjoying my time with her, last night we videocalled again and it was great. There is the matter of distance though, she's being honest with me and she says that she doesn't know if seeing each other in real life not nearly as often as we'd like wouldn't cause her too much longing (also for the physical part) and sadness. So it's possible that she will break it off for that reason but we've decided to make the most of our time until she's made that decision. At Christmas we might see each other for one or two days, if we really hit it off she considers spending the night at my place. Don't think too much of that though. She's also a Christian and while the classic 'true love waits' no sex until marriage thing is not going to happen because we wouldn't be able to control ourselves even if we tried, I have asked that we don't be intimate until we've committed to a relationship. Because as a Christian I do prefer to have sex embedded in the context of a relationship and not outside of it, and also if we're intimate and then she breaks it off because of the distance, saying goodbye would be even harder. But even just touching and kissing her is something I'm really looking forward to when we meet. Who knows what happens after we kiss, maybe we won't be able to stop, but I'm not aiming for that.

    Sorry for oversharing but actually IDGAF, I haven't been this excited in years, it's overwhelming.
    Last edited by Harvester; 4th Dec 2023 at 06:02.

  25. #25
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Maupertuis
    Tocky, that's a lovely gift, and with an interesting story behind it too! And congratulations on a promising relationship, Harvester!

    I've just about rounded out my gift purchases. There's nothing spectacular among them, but none of them are thoughtless either. I even find myself looking forward to Christmas, for once! Normally I'm quite a grinch. Christmas was what made me realize I was poor, as a child, and the time spent among the extended family was draining.

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