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Thread: What are you playing? (2024 Edition)

  1. #51
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2024
    Location: Egyptian Afterlife
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missio...l_(video_game)

    Mission Critical

    "The game consists of 3D graphics and features live-action scenes, with the cast including Michael Dorn and Patricia Charbonneau. The games storyline focuses on the player taking on the role of a single crew member, who is left behind on their ship after their captain feigns a surrender to ensure a vital mission can continue. The player's goal focuses on repairing their ship after a recent battle, and then getting to the surface of a planet to complete a secret scientific mission that could provide the means to ending a war over technological advancements and artificial life. "

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martia...c:_Unification

    Martian Gothic

    "The game is very similar to the Resident Evil series: third-person perspective; fixed camera angle; tank controls; “Vac-Tubes” in the place of item boxes; and colored key-cards. The game focuses heavily on puzzle solving and exploration, rather than combat. However, the combat system focuses on crowd control or dispatching small and weak enemies as it is easy to become overwhelmed by enemies such as the non-dead who walk at exactly the same pace as the player. The game is centered on three playable characters that are separated. This separate trio gimmick is similar to Day of the Tentacle. One of the unique features of the game is that if the characters ever meet face-to-face, it will result in a game-over. "

    Nice one liners in this game. I find it humorous.
    Last edited by DuatDweller; 21st Jan 2024 at 05:25. Reason: missing details

  2. #52
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Quote Originally Posted by henke View Post
    Sulph was RIGHT.

    Chants of Sennaar is SO GOOD.
    Phew. I was starting to wonder if my infatuation with really good mechanics was starting to make my tastes skew towards the idiosyncratic for most. Glad to hear you enjoyed it!

    @Hit Deity - indeed, Jedi Survivor is a good game, but it's not quite reached its final form, whatever that might be... and I don't know if it will, so we'll have to see how the third one is (minus Stig, I wonder who Respawn's fingering to direct it.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Anarchic Fox View Post
    What do y'all think are the games that feel most like Star Wars, then?
    Rebel Assault, obviously.

    Well. It's actually a complicated question. Like JM says, it depends on what your conception of Star Wars is. The general idea I think people have is that it's got to be an adventure with high stakes, typically massive set pieces, and checks off the following: the Force, light sabers, an evil empire that needs overcoming via sheer force of will and grit, a protagonist with a relatable personal struggle, and the whole shebang owes a whole bunch to Akira Kurasawa. The franchise philosophy, in the end, is about achieving balance, and the wars fought to obtain it (what is this, some kind of Star War?). So - it's not very deep.

    The thing about the question is, the video games we have don't really do 'Star Wars' holistically; or if they try, their wax wings melt way too early (The Force Unleashed 1/2). Did you like the WW2 space dogfighting? Then X-Wing and TIE Fighter are your benchmarks. Did you like the fights with the Force and all the light sabering? Then it's Jedi Knight 2 which still hasn't been equalled as a pure combat-based experience (once you get off Nar Shadaa, anyway). Did you feel that the trooper clones could have had an interesting story in them? Republic Commando's great. Do you want something that's kinda good overall while aping the current-day genre zeitgeist? That's JFO and JS.

    But the obvious answer, if what you want is a 'Star Wars-like adventure' that can be called pretty good even if there are some qualifications, is still Knights of the Old Republic, with its grody Neverwinter Nights-based mechanics. I contend that as a game it's fine, if you have enough tolerance, but it doesn't do anything particularly interesting except tell a decent story (with the typical Bioware peaks and troughs).

    If you want a Star Wars game that really does something interesting to capture your attention instead though, never mind whether it's Star Wars-y enough, my personal favourite is KoTOR II. As a bonus, it attempts some questions on the morality of the Force - not in a supremely sophisticated manner, but the fact that it does at all while telling a good story is achievement enough.

  3. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by Sulphur View Post
    Well. It's actually a complicated question. Like JM says, it depends on what your conception of Star Wars is. The general idea I think people have is that it's got to be an adventure with high stakes, typically massive set pieces, and checks off the following: the Force, light sabers, an evil empire that needs overcoming via sheer force of will and grit, a protagonist with a relatable personal struggle, and the whole shebang owes a whole bunch to Akira Kurasawa. The franchise philosophy, in the end, is about achieving balance, and the wars fought to obtain it (what is this, some kind of Star War?). So - it's not very deep.
    It should be said that George Lucas is on record for saying that to him the Star Wars concept of "Balance" is the Light side wiping out the Dark side. I can't recall the exact wording from the interview, where he was asked if balance in the Force should mean that the Light side was as strong in the galaxy as the Dark side, but his answer was basically that the Dark side existing in the galaxy meant there could be no balance.

    But yea, Star Wars is something different to everyone. For some a good SW game needs to get the space wizard magic right, for others the core is the struggle of a small force fighting for "good", then there are those who feel epic space battles is the essence of SW and so on.

  4. #54
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2003
    Location: The Plateaux Of Mirror
    Before the prequels, I think a Jedi game that played more like Thief would have been awesome. Something where your character was like Obi-Wan in Star Wars, infiltrating the Empire with stealth and subterfuge instead of flinging rocks and waving a laser sword.

    For me it's tough because my favorite Star Wars games have things that were introduced in media that I don't like. Like bad guys using lightsabers will never feel right to me (Vader had one because he was a Jedi). Or everyone being re-christened Darth, when that always just seemed like a badass name that Anakin took to be intimidating because he was basically a henchman.

  5. #55
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    I've been playing a lot of Islets, a lovely little Metroidvania. It does for me what I'd hoped Gato Roboto would do, before I realised that I'd already played through the latter. Basically, Islets feels like the cheerful, sunny cousin to Hollow Knight; it's easier, lighter, chirpier, but I think it does this really well. To some extent I'd recommend this to someone who bounced off of Hollow Knight because of the difficulty and melancholy, and I'd definitely recommend it either as someone's first Metroidvania or as a Metroidvania for someone who wants to relax and have fun for a few hours in between more challenging games. What it gets right, which for me is key with Metroidvanias: moving around is fun, especially once you've got an upgrade or two. It also has a fairly clever thing where you explore individual floating islands that, once you've activated a MacGuffin, are mashed together, so you now can move between the islands. Obviously opening new paths is standard Metroidvania fare, but the way Islets does it is kinda cool.

  6. #56
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2002
    Location: Edmonton
    Islets looks interesting! I'm up for a relaxing metroidvania. Wishlisted.

    I've been playing Tunic, and I'm a little lukewarm on it. I've found a bunch of pages and I can sort of see where the puzzles are going, but something about the atmosphere and aesthetic rub me the wrong way. I think a big part of it is the soundtrack, which to my snobby musician sensibility sounds like the composers thought they were writing the emotional epic of the decade, but it comes across as inappropriate and overbearing. And some of their melodic choices are unfortunate. Overall it feels a little too precious and on-the-nose with its melancholy, which is a complaint I had with Hollow Knight, too, although the gameplay there was rock solid and more than made up for it. Tunic's combat is serviceable but also somewhat muddy and instinct, not satisfying enough to stand on its own.

    I've also been replaying Kentucky Route Zero -- I'm going to finish it this time! I've maybe said it before, but the interlude piece called The Entertainment (free standalone download in the link) is one of the most absorbing and chilling things I've ever played (as in: I literally get chills every time I finish it). It probably sounds hypocritical to accuse a game of being too pretentious and then sing the praises of what I'm sure a lot of people consider to be one of the most pretentious games ever made. For me, though, KRZ strikes an almost impossible balance of genuine literary accomplishment without feeling like a self-indulgent showcase for the author's talent. Even Disco Elysium, which I loved, didn't quite get this right, but KRZ absolutely walks that line for me; it's a great postmodern work of art.

    Oh, and the most Star Wars games are Shadows of the Empire, which only gets this accolade because the soundtrack is entirely ripped from the films and most of the locations are too; and Tales from the Galaxy's Edge, which genuinely does feel like Star Wars, as in what it would feel like to fire a blaster or wave a lightsaber. Problem is it's not that great of a game.

  7. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by Aja View Post
    I've been playing Tunic, and I'm a little lukewarm on it. I've found a bunch of pages and I can sort of see where the puzzles are going, but something about the atmosphere and aesthetic rub me the wrong way.
    Tunic is more about discovery than the moment to moment gameplay. That means discovery of the world and gameplay mechanics. Tunic is probably going to be a miss for you in the long run, if that doesn't entice you. The story isn't that important, and it's mostly present in the manual in a language/font you have to translate yourself (or you could find a translated copy online if you care).

  8. #58
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2002
    Location: Edmonton
    It entices me in principle (Outer Wilds is one of my favourite games ever), but in practice I think this game has a bit of a tonal mismatch. I haven't got to the heavy translation parts yet, so I think I'll give it a few more hours at least.

  9. #59
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    KRZ's the sort of magical realism that does things for me. I don't know how to describe it except that it's like poetry, but written in whispers and flickering shadow, it's dusk fading to indigo at your windowsill, it's moonlight glancing off a mirror.

    Anyway, I should finish it.

    Regarding Tunic, I can see why its mix of mystery and hard edges is at odds with the bouncy fox you play, though I can't say I found the combat as slushy. I'm not sure about that read on the soundtrack, most of what I've heard is basically ambient chill - I was sort of disappointed, because Lifeformed did one of the best soundtracks for a video game a long-ass time ago, for Dustforce. This is still a great track I listen to fairly often, and the soundtrack's got a lovely chill melodic vibe. Tunic's hasn't stuck with me so far, but it also hasn't offended me either.

  10. #60
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2002
    Location: Edmonton
    To me it sounds like it was going for something like what Disasterpiece did in Hyper Light Drifter except in that case the soundtrack is in lockstep with the game's visual and gameplay aesthetics, and while both have a bit of a VST sheen to them, HLD's compositions are striking while Tunic sounds like pablum. When I was a kid I used to take piano lessons through Yamaha, and they focused a lot on ear training, so we were always singing simple melodies in solfege. Whenever I hear those "do re mi re do" primary-school type melodies, I feel like the composer isn't trying hard enough. Apparently the Tunic soundtrack took seven years to complete, which suggests it was a struggle.

  11. #61
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2003
    Location: Mossad Time Machine
    Sticking with the Prison Architect aesthetic, I gave Rec Center Tycoon a whirl. The title is pretty self-explanatory I should think. It's okay. Quite unpolished, a few annoying bugs, and it doesn't really give you much guidance. I had some fun with it though. And the achievement for banning a patron for no reason is called "Reddit Mod", so props for that. For genre fans on discount.

    Still, Rec Center Tycoon is positively hand-holding when compared to Kingdom Two Crowns. So far as I can gather, because the game gives you negligible hints, you need to run around getting gold coins to upgrade your base like some 2D tower defense game, although again, the precise purpose for doing so remains a mystery. The pixel graphics look nice, but I played for about an hour and I'm still not sure what's going on. A negative review on Steam (very much a minority opinion) refers to it simply as "Walk left to right simulator", which I think falls under the banner of "harsh but fair". I'll play a bit more, but I can't see this grabbing my attention unless it does something soon.

    [EDIT: looking into it, and it seems this is the third game in a series; perhaps I'm missing something by not playing the first two, which are also in my library of shame]
    Last edited by SD; 22nd Jan 2024 at 18:19.

  12. #62
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    Tunic's melancholy worked for me, but it's definitely more of a vibe than anything else. There is definitely an underlying sadness to the story and world, but it's a relatively shallow sadness. With Hollow Knight, the melancholy is much more pervasive. Though weirdly - since I never played console games as a kid and therefore missed out on the games that Tunic riffs on - I still felt this melancholy for a past that I wasn't really a part of.

    Anyway: after Islets, I got started on Thief mod extraordinare The Black Parade... and I realise that it'll take me some time to 'learn' Thief again. I had the same problem in reverse with Dishonored: I played it too much like Thief, expecting the world and especially the guards to react the same, and while there's obviously a lot of affinity between the two games, the systems do feel different in practice. I love what I've seen of The Black Parade, but I'll have to relearn things - when and how to move, how best to blackjack, how long to hang around in the shadows to observe - before I'll truly enjoy the game.

    @Aja: Did you ever get to play The Entertainment in VR? (If I'm not mistaken, that option no longer exists, since the VR code was never updated.) Sadly, I never did, but I liked the idea a lot, and I would've loved to experience the lofi-but-stylish KRZ world in VR.
    Last edited by Thirith; 23rd Jan 2024 at 05:37.

  13. #63
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2024
    Location: Egyptian Afterlife
    Well is not a game is two games into one.

    Yes is Tale of Two Wastelands, gotta admit it has a cumbersome install with Mod Organizer 2, once the merge is done you can start either game (Fallout 3 or Fallout New Vegas) from within New Vegas, Fallout 3 is acting like a super mod (since you can start a new game from NV), includes all DLCs for both games (you must have them for it to work).

    You can even play some non TTW (Tale of Two Wastelands) mods of course they must be for NV else you couldn't play it, since all FO3 mods need to be converted to TTW.

    I was having a blast with the D.E.I.M.O.S. mod for NV (non TTW), a little time travel and there you go.

  14. #64
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    My office buddy Ville and I have been taking turns playing through MGS: Twin Snakes on the Game Cube over the past few weeks/months, and we finally reached the ending.

    I'd only played the original up till the Sniper Wolf hallway bit previously, so it was fun to finally see the whole game. Kinda wild that this series became such a mainstream hit. Everything about it seems destined for cult classic status. Endless, self-indulgent cutscenes. Gameplay which is at once very arcadey AND too realistic. Hostile level design. Take that opening room. A nice introduction to stealth gameplay might simply be to have a couple guards patroling in a circle around the containers. With how sensetive the walk speed is, simply sneaking up on one of them (without accidentally running and letting them hear you) and knocking them out would be difficult enough. But instead the guards patrol in weird criss cross patterns. And there's 3 of them! And there's puddles which make you leave footprints so they can track you. Everything about the room feels designed to trip you up. It's hostile, and much of the game that follows feels the same. It's like they didn't want people to have fun playing this. Still, there's stealth bits later on which do work ok. It's constantly throwing unexpected twists at you. It's never boring. A very interesting game.

  15. #65
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    I've never played Twin Snakes, but what I remember is fans being critical of it when compared to the original MGS. Certainly the original had its flaws, and being a Kojima game, of course it was going to be self-indulgent, but I don't remember it tripping you up right from the off. In fact, the opening where the guards could see your footprints in the snow was kinda fun in the original MGS, because I certainly wasn't expecting that kind of detail - still, it was quite manageable.

    Also, I hear the cutscenes in TS were... a bit much. Which is saying something when you're in Kojima town.

  16. #66
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Maupertuis
    Yeah, the action cutscenes were much less grounded in the Twin Snakes remake. I particularly remember one scene where Snake does parkour off a missile fired at him.

  17. #67
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2002
    Location: Edmonton
    Quote Originally Posted by Thirith View Post
    @Aja: Did you ever get to play The Entertainment in VR? (If I'm not mistaken, that option no longer exists, since the VR code was never updated.) Sadly, I never did, but I liked the idea a lot, and I would've loved to experience the lofi-but-stylish KRZ world in VR.
    No, but I agree, the ending especially of The Entertainment would've been incredible in VR (although I've played it twice flat now and both times it genuinely did give me chills, even when I knew what was coming). There are some goofy instructions on how to play it in "VR," but they mostly amount to putting on the play with a group of friends.

    Cost of this version varies with the price of bread and bricks, but it should be less expensive than an Oculus Rift headset.

  18. #68
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2004
    I bounced off of Tunic after I realized it's basically a soulslike with a single one-time use health potion that only restores 1/3 of your health. I heard they added easy mode in the full game, but the demo I played before release was brutal.

  19. #69
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Quote Originally Posted by Sulphur View Post
    In fact, the opening where the guards could see your footprints in the snow was kinda fun in the original MGS, because I certainly wasn't expecting that kind of detail - still, it was quite manageable.
    Well we eventually managed to get past it so I suppose it was managable. Can't say it was fun tho.

    And yeah Twin Snakes' cutscenes go on forever. I did some googling and someone had figured out the gameplay-to-cutscene ratios of the games by comparing HowLongToBeat time VS length of "All cutscenes from... " YT compilations.

    MGS1
    Total play time = 11h 32m (692 minutes)
    Gameplay = 8h 17 m (497 minutes)
    Cutscenes = 3h 15m (195 minutes)

    Gameplay/Cutscene = 2.5487
    Cutscene Proportion = 28%

    MGS2
    Total play time = 13h 08m (788 minutes)
    Gameplay = 7h 44m (464 minutes)
    Cutscenes = 5h 24m, (324 minutes)

    Gameplay/Cutscene = 1.4321
    Cutscene Proportion = 41%

    MGS3
    Total play time = 16h 11m (971 minutes)
    Gameplay = 11h 13m (673 minutes)
    Cutscenes = 4h 58m (298 minutes)

    Gameplay/Cutscene = 2.2584
    Cutscene Proportion = 31%

    MGS: PO
    Total play time = 12h 36m (756 minutes)
    Gameplay = 10h 39m (639 minutes)
    Cutscenes = 1h 42m (102 minutes)

    Gameplay/Cutscene = 6.2647
    Cutscene Proportion = 13%

    MGS4
    Total play time = 19h 27m (1,167 minutes)
    Gameplay = 10h 59m (659 minutes)
    Cutscenes = 8h 26m (508 minutes)

    Gameplay/Cutscene = 1.2972
    Cutscene Proportion = 44%

    MGS: PW
    Total play time = 34h 08m (2,048 minutes)
    Gameplay = 31h 11m (1,871 minutes)
    Cutscenes = 2h 57m (177 minutes)

    Gameplay/Cutscene = 10.5706
    Cutscene Proportion = 9%

    MGR: Revengeance
    Total play time = 7h 47m (467 minutes)
    Gameplay = 5h 28m (328 minutes)
    Cutscenes = 2h 19m (139 minutes)

    Gameplay/Cutscene = 2.3597
    Cutscene Proportion = 30%

    Twin Snakes isn't on the list, but lemme do the math...

    Total play time = 10h 14m (614 minutes)
    Cutscenes = 3h 23m (203 minutes)

    Cutscene Proportion = 33%

    Huh, not as bad as MGS2 and 4, but still pretty intense. I honestly felt like MGS3 had the most cutscenes, but I guess not.

  20. #70
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    MGS4 took the biscuit for cutscenes, in my experience. And I see that's borne out - it had an almost 1.5 hour epilogue, for crying out loud.

    I also don't remember MGS2 having cutscenes that long, but they're probably counting the codec conversations, which definitely could go on for a bit.

    Anyway, re: MGS: TTS, I'm fascinated by the idea that it's hard. I'll have to compare it with MGS 1 someday, maybe, but in my experience of MGS1-5, I'd say 3 was more challenging, but it also gave you way more options. MGS 1 had some boss fights that pissed me off a little, but they were fun to work out at the time. I don't remember dealing with the guards being particularly difficult in the PSX version at least.

  21. #71
    Thing What Kicks
    Registered: Apr 2004
    Location: London
    MGS4 was my first MGS game (I sold my PS1 before the original MGS came out in order to buy an N64).
    Not exactly the best advertisement for the series. You could never tell when the next 30 minute+ cutscene would interrupt proceedings.

    It was certainly one of the games that helped cement my view that the term "auteur" is more often than not a polite term for "pretentious wanker".

  22. #72
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    For what it's worth, MGS4 was the one where Kojima was mostly hands-off*. I don't reckon it's bad overall, but the cutscenes and poor plotting definitely did try my patience at times.

    Also, that is a terrible entry point into the series! Its MO was to pick up all the threads it could from the previous entries and bring them to a lot of poorly paid-off conclusions, which means not only must it have read as ludicrously opaque fluff in your playthrough, it also retroactively spoiled you on what would have been the best parts of the series' setup from 1-3. Oh well, it's too bad, really, because I think MGS3 was one of the finest games of its generation, and it managed that by showcasing unexpected gameplay depth while being fantastically silly, and it still took you through a fun yet moving journey in spite of its penchant for labouring its points.


    Edit: *looking it up to refresh my memory, Kojima was going to be hands-off, but fans apparently entreated him to get more involved via... death threats. So he ended up being a co-director. I do remember in an interview he said something along the lines of wanting new talent to have their voices heard in MGS4, but that's from a video I saw 15 years ago, so my recollection may not be exactly accurate.
    Last edited by Sulphur; 24th Jan 2024 at 06:15.

  23. #73
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    This all reminds me when I was playing Death Stranding, which was my first real experience with Kojima's kind of game, I remember an early cut scene that was really over the top--I was already sick of them from the first one, but this one got crazy quick--where the guy started levitating and lighting and meteors and shit starting raining down and exploding around him while he went off on Lord knows what rant, and I just remember thinking, look man, I just want to get back to walking. That's all I want to do here. Can I go now? XD
    He didn't let me. So I never did get very far into that game, although I liked the bits where I was tactically walking in nature.

  24. #74
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2006
    Location: Washington DC
    Kojima could make a lot more accessible and, frankly, better media if he were subordinate to someone with the authority to veto the pretentious, self-indulgent, tonally dissonant, and just plain overwrought writing that saturates his games and distracts from the actual gameplay.

    The MGS games do such interesting stuff with their gameplay that it's a shame they're mostly known for weird writing and long cutscenes. They have some surprisingly sophisticated stealth mechanics, AI that reacts to your methods and adapts accordingly, interesting setpieces, and some cleverly implemented item/environment interactions that would probably prompt more arguments over whether the games qualify as 'immersive sims' if they weren't buried under all the auteur garbage. They're some really cool games when Kojima will just shut up and let you play them.

    Anyways, Malf clued me in to Blood West in the Best of 2023 thread, and so far I've been having a good time with it. It's an open-world stealth shooter with RPG elements, but I agree with Malf that it isn't much of an imm sim beyond ticking those boxes. It seemed very hard at first until I understood the boundaries of the AI and stealth system, which have and now it's manageable- combat is dangerous, but avoiding enemies is easy and dying has been rare. And it has atmosphere in spades, with a consistent art style backed up by moody ambience that picks up different motifs depending on where you go in the open world. Stephen Russell also does a great job voicing the gravelly undead cowboy protagonist. I've just about finished the first act it seems, so hoping the remaining two are as good.

    Edit: Oh yeah, and I finished True Stalker, which starts off strong but overstays its welcome. The protagonist character gets knocked out a total of, no joke, over twenty times, a not-insignificant amount of my playtime consisted of running through empty environments (no A-Life) to get to a quest destination, and the last quarter of the game feels like wanky fanfiction. It has excellent UI improvements and some interesting missions, but by the end I just wanted to be done. Solid effort, doubt I'll ever replay it.
    Last edited by catbarf; 24th Jan 2024 at 17:15.

  25. #75
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Quote Originally Posted by catbarf View Post
    Kojima could make a lot more accessible and, frankly, better media if he were subordinate to someone with the authority to veto the pretentious, self-indulgent, tonally dissonant, and just plain overwrought writing that saturates his games and distracts from the actual gameplay.

    The MGS games do such interesting stuff with their gameplay that it's a shame they're mostly known for weird writing and long cutscenes. They have some surprisingly sophisticated stealth mechanics, AI that reacts to your methods and adapts accordingly, interesting setpieces, and some cleverly implemented item/environment interactions that would probably prompt more arguments over whether the games qualify as 'immersive sims' if they weren't buried under all the auteur garbage. They're some really cool games when Kojima will just shut up and let you play them.
    We mostly got that in The Phantom Pain, and I have to say that while it's a fantastic game, the open world layout and the (relative) lack of narrative quickly skewed the balance in the opposite direction, and I didn't care all that much for it. Unlike some folks, I like cutscenes, especially when they're paced out well during a playthrough, for example as a payoff for clearing a gruelling gameplay section. Though it's not hard to admit that cutscene pacing isn't Kojima's strong suit, I think TPP's story was just too fragmented and disperse. I think striking a stronger middle ground would have made it pretty much the Metal Gear, if it could have been made without Konami booting Kojima around.

    Also, the graphics whore in me never died, and I will never fail to be impressed with how his team pull off all of those cinematics in each game in real-time, every goddamn time.

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