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Thread: What are you playing? (2024 Edition)

  1. #76
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: the Sheeple Pen
    Quote Originally Posted by Anarchic Fox View Post
    What do y'all think are the games that feel most like Star Wars, then?
    Like Sulphur and JM pointed out, we all expect different things from a Star Wars game. I had never thought about it that way. For me, Jedi: Fallen Order really captured that Star Wars feeling. It's not the best SW game though, although I don't know which one deserves that title. The Lego Star Wars games were pretty fun. X-Wing was great but it's ancient now. Never played Tie Fighter. SW Squadrons isn't bad, but everything in it feels way too scripted. Dark Forces and Jedi Knight 2 were also a lot of fun, some of my favourite games back then, but they're also ancient now. KOTOR 1 & 2 had great stories but the actual gameplay was awful.

    I'll get Jedi Survivor on XBox once it gets a bit cheaper, or finds its way on the Game Pass.

  2. #77
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2003
    Location: The Plateaux Of Mirror
    If you took the Star Wars license away from Jedi Survivor, would it still be an interesting game?

  3. #78
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2002
    Location: Edmonton
    In most games I have no patience for cutscene, but I admit I've got a soft spot for Kojima's, and I wouldn't have them any other way than his absurd, cringey, self-indulgent style. Death Stranding wouldn't be the profoundly weird and unique experience it is if the gameplay wasn't bolstered by its bizarre story.

  4. #79
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    @Tomi: You may want to check out the X-Wing Alliance Upgrade community and the work they're doing. They've done impressive things with X-Wing Alliance, including a Total Conversion of TIE Fighter.

  5. #80
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: the Sheeple Pen
    Quote Originally Posted by Thirith View Post
    @Tomi: You may want to check out the X-Wing Alliance Upgrade community and the work they're doing. They've done impressive things with X-Wing Alliance, including a Total Conversion of TIE Fighter.
    Ah, I had actually forgotten about X-Wing Alliance. I'll have to check out the Upgrade some time.

    I started playing Hitman: World of Assassination (it has all three "new" Hitman games) because it's leaving Game Pass at the end of this month. I wish I hadn't left it so late, because I'm actually quite enjoying this game. I like its fresh take on stealth with all the different disguises, and even though the sneaking part of the game isn't on the same level with something like Thief, it's surprisingly fun. The levels are beautifully crafted and feel like real places rather than game levels.

    Having said that, the game is full of spy movie cliches, and acquiring intel is a bit too simplified. In fact the intel is usually forced down your throat when people happily tell all their darkest secrets right in front of you and everyone else, or you find a top secret document that someone has conveniently forgotten on their desk. In general the game holds your hand a bit too much - I think it'd be nicer to actually figure out something by yourself rather than just following the quest markers. On the other hand there are so many things to do and so many ways to complete each mission, that it's alright.

    No way I'm going to make it through all three Hitman games in just a couple of days, so unless World of Assassination has a big discount some time soon, I guess I'll have to watch the ending on Youtube or something.

  6. #81
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Moyer View Post
    If you took the Star Wars license away from Jedi Survivor, would it still be an interesting game?
    Good question. It'd still be a passable action-adventure, from what I've played so far.

    @Tomi: yeah, there's a lot of game in Hitman 1-3 to get through, part of why I keep putting it off. Regarding quest markers, I... don't remember any. I guess they appear when you've got Opportunities on, which you can turn to minimal so that it's not as hand-holdy.

  7. #82
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    All right, so I dusted Tunic off because it was next on the list after Origins of the Assassins' Colon, and I am digging it. There's a lot of stuff going on with this game despite its immediate, unassuming nature, and I appreciate the twinkle that must have been in the team's eye as they made this.

    Look, it's clever, okay?* If you had a childhood like mine where gaming was escapism, and a television screen or computer monitor was a window into something else, you know what this is channelling. No, not the feeling of going into 'another world', though there is some of that; but beyond that - the sense of excavating something strange and tantalising out of the pixels on the screen, chipping your way through an experience that was both hostile and alluring at the same time, getting stuck, stuck for hours, days, and then something clicking in the back of your head, and *bam*, you figured it out. And in the case of those NES games I'm invoking, your thought process may have been: devious game, shitty game, fucking ingenious game, ugh. And then losing yourself in it again.

    Tunic's a little like that. It doesn't have those extremes of peak and valley, but it summons those feelings even while looking like it was folded from construction paper, and yet it also belies a precision no child could manage, cut and measured out to exact specifications almost as if made with tape and graph paper - which it probably was, if you swap those out with level design tools. It looks lovely, and I don't mind the soundtrack - it's chill enough, and functions to accentuate what's going on the screen, which is fine, though I imagine synth fiends might find its arpeggiating a little, er, one-note.

    As for gameplay, the combat's fine once you figure out how to do the Zelda-like stuff. You know, getting more health, upping your stats. This is of course not helped by the game refusing to explain itself. As with those NES games, it's like looking at a manual written in a language you can't really comprehend, and drawing the connections together from images and symbols, and the in-game manual represents that pretty much exactly. One thing, though - this game is in love with hiding shit from you. Because of the isometric camera, it hides stuff behind everything: behind a wall, behind a waterfall (all of them?), in a dark corner, behind an area that looked like a dead end before the camera turns around and says, 'ha, it was a path all along!', it hides a secret area in a secret area, and it keeps going. I'm getting secret fatigue, and I'm still only halfway through. It'd be nice if Steam's notes feature let me annotate screenshots, because this is the perfect use case for it. Also, the wandering around is more frustration than eureka moment for me, but that's probably because I have no sense of direction. I'm not embarrassed to say I looked up a walkthrough once to just get on with the next thing, and I don't feel like I've robbed myself of something by doing that.

    I guess I'll have something more to say when I finish the game, especially with what it does in terms of how its core mechanic is actually information. But we'll get to that when we get to that.


    *And as you keep going, may be too clever, even.

  8. #83
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: the Sheeple Pen
    I've actually had Tunic installed for a couple of months already, so I'm also going to give it a proper try, and will report back here later!

    My first impressions are somewhat positive, even though I don't really like how it looks. Seems a bit too "generic low poly" to me, but it's not bad either. There seems to be a lot of little secrets to be found indeed, and I always love finding secret stuff. I just found the sword and suddenly I seem to have a lot of new places to explore. I have no idea what I'm actually supposed to do, but I think I'm going to like this game. We'll see about that.

  9. #84
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    I played This Bed We Made. It's a good snapshot of society in the 1950s. It's an investigation point & click game that's does a good job actually making it a legit investigation. It's also what EvaBot would denounce as an agenda game. I'm fine with the agenda, but I'd say it does get a little in the way of a pure police procedural kind of investigation, as in bits sometimes feel added and sometimes people do things that don't make sense to draw the game out or make some points that probably wouldn't be if it were a pure mirror of the chaos of real life. But anyway the great story, setting, and characters, and the flow the game itself is good, and the investigation is what pulls you through all of those things. So it's worth that bit of stretch. But anyway it's as a snapshot of being in that world, doing things and talking as one would in that world, that's really great.

    I also got through Chants of Sennaar. Also a point and click that's stands out in the genre. The language puzzles are as interesting as advertised. It also makes a point about how different cultures miss each other, and how their different ways of thinking leak into their language, values, way of life, aesthetics, etc. Also lots of low key P&C puzzles and stealth sections. It's a bit of a mix, but a good one. A few things push the challenge, but it also makes you feel really good when you figure a puzzle out. I think anyone can figure them all out if you explore enough.

    Both of these were great games and keeps my faith in point & click games as still a good platform for games with a good flow and story.

  10. #85
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2003
    Location: Sweden
    Lots of playing... when i'm really in the mood i do have big tendency to try to play everything at once and, of course, this is why i never finish anything.

    Daggerfall Unity. I have some fun in this, definitely feels really old school, even with the updated graphics/UI, and mostly in a good way.

    Caesar 3 (Augustus mod) this is a really, really amazing mod that improves upon this game in numerous ways. A must play if you ever liked Caesar 3 back in the day.

    Morrowind. This game still fucking rules. "but the combat sucks!" Really? Play Daggerfall for just 1h, make sure to do a lot of combat. Then play Morrowind and suddenly you will go "this is the best combat i've ever experienced in my entire life! It's responsive and it has so much weight to it!" (I'm not even joking). Of course, you can then play e.g Elden Ring and try to come back to MW, that wil be a tough one

  11. #86
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Awwwww yeah baby check this shit out



    POW POW POW!

    5000 souls --------> IN DA BAG

  12. #87
    Thing What Kicks
    Registered: Apr 2004
    Location: London
    Lol, that's exactly my grinding spot from when I played the US version I imported before the game was released in the UK way back when

  13. #88
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: the Sheeple Pen
    Quote Originally Posted by Sulphur View Post
    @Tomi: yeah, there's a lot of game in Hitman 1-3 to get through, part of why I keep putting it off. Regarding quest markers, I... don't remember any. I guess they appear when you've got Opportunities on, which you can turn to minimal so that it's not as hand-holdy.
    Yeah, there was indeed a setting that you could change to make the quest markers go away. In the end I chose to keep the quest markers anyway, because I just wanted to get through the game...

    ... and I actually did manage to finish the main campaign today! It's supposed to be leaving Game Pass at some point today as well, so talk about perfect timing.

    Hitman WoA is the first Hitman game that I've ever played, and it's much better than I thought it would be! The level design is awesome, and not just because of all the beautifully crafted locations, but because there are always many different ways to get through a mission. Sometimes I felt that there were too many ways to assassinate some poor soul - the game always gives you like five different ways to get rid of your target, and you just choose whichever is the most fun way to do it. There's not so much challenge if you're patient enough to wait for the perfect moment and you don't care about scoring points. But I like it that way, it's quite entertaining.

    I had to rush through some of the Hitman 3 missions, but at that point I was starting to get a bit bored anyway. There would have been some DLC left to play, but right now I feel like I've assassinated enough people for quite some time!

  14. #89
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2002
    Location: Edmonton
    I've been combing through my Steam back catalogue looking for titles that work well on Steam Deck. I tried Bioshock again for the first time in years, and I have to say I kind of hate this game now. I was such a big fan when it released, but most of what I loved about it then grates with me now. Rapture is still is a wonderful setting, but the amount of narrative hand-waving that needs to be done for the story to progress is a lot harder to ignore. And the little sisters were always dumb, but now they feel especially so, to the point that I don't want to engage with them at all. The combat always did feel a little ropey, too, but I guess I put up with it because I liked the atmosphere. Well, atmosphere can't save the combat anymore. It sucks; none of your weapons have any weight and the way to get through most scenarios seems to be to just tank it out and spam medkits. The graphics are still beautiful, though, and the writing itself is sharp. I just wish the writing was in service of a better idea.

    I've also been playing Tomb Raider (2013) and am enjoying it quite a bit. It's kind of a pablum game; it tells you exactly where to go, what button to press, but the controls are smooth and the shooting is fun, Lara's character is interesting enough, and the setpieces are exciting but not so exciting that I can't play it before bed. I don't think I made it more than a couple hours in back in the day, but I'll probably finish it this time. It's scratching the itch that I keep hoping Horizon: Zero Dawn will scratch, but no matter how many times I buy that game, I can't seem to get more than a few hours into it before losing interest. It doesn't help that it has terrible traversal stutter on Steam Deck, even when I drop the res to Game Boy levels.

  15. #90
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Quote Originally Posted by Aja View Post
    I just wish the writing was in service of a better idea.
    What's wrong with the idea? I've always been fascinated with the idea of video games and the people who play them making a mutual assumption that the protagonist is the player, that a player by default embodies the character they control, and the video game reinforces that at every turn. Bioshock's a fun little turn on the idea that this provides you, the player, with anything like agency, but it does eviscerate its own point after it bashes it into Ryan's skull.

    Or is it the critique of objectivism, which devolves into a very unsubtle tale of autocracy vs. collectivism when you take a step back and look at it and its sequel together?

    I've also been playing Tomb Raider (2013) and am enjoying it quite a bit. It's kind of a pablum game; it tells you exactly where to go, what button to press, but the controls are smooth and the shooting is fun, Lara's character is interesting enough, and the setpieces are exciting but not so exciting that I can't play it before bed.
    Yeah I dunno. I liked TR 2013 when it came out, but in retrospect that was mostly the graphics razzle-dazzle. It's a muddled game and trilogy, and Lara Croft: First Blood is an interesting direction, but it's hefted with all the nuance of a sledgehammer, and the sheer amount of combat while you're supposed to be playing a vulnerable, fledgling Lara who's somehow only psychologically scarred in cutscenes... it's a schizophrenic mix. This is easier to ignore in Uncharted, because you can internalise that Drake's possibly just a psychopath underneath the quips and charisma, but also because Uncharted's tone is much breezier, and the action movie pacing makes it a fun ride. The new TR trilogy always makes me go, 'Okay, so you want me to take her seriously', but then instead of exploring Lara's frame of mind, it just piles into its mess of skill trees and crafting loops while moving its plot through a series of motions designed to funnel set pieces in and handwave any real development for her. It just doesn't hold together in the end, which is a shame because I could see the combat reinforcing the fun situated in a different context in a different game, or the story being more interesting in a game trilogy filled with actual exploration and tomb raiding.

    RE: Horizon Zero Dawn, I dunno what the itch might be, but it's definitely not the same thing a Tomb Raider does. HZD is essentially a Ubisoft map game, just done with more panache and a better-written backstory. The mystery of the world and how it came to be like that was HZD's driving force for me, not so much its present-day narrative. It plays well, though, and it's an entertaining romp if you can engage with its overall construction.
    Last edited by Sulphur; 1st Feb 2024 at 01:24.

  16. #91
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    I was never that into Bioshock, even early on. It's main inspiration was supposed to be System Shock 2, but compared to SS2 it felt really claustrophobic, not in a good way, and it was too... I don't know the right term, pastel and circus-like?, to have any of the atmosphere that SS2 oozed in every location. I liked the combat scenarios for what they were, and there were some very nice visuals. It was still a highlight of the year (although it doesn't stand all that well against the likes of Portal, Assassin's Creed, & Mass Effect), but even as a highlight, it just didn't have much of the old magic for me.

    I won't say that that magic was lost after a certain period, though, because both Dishonored and Prey had a lot of the old magic for me still, even with a lot of the modern tropes that can rub me the wrong way (screen bling, etc.).

  17. #92
    Thing What Kicks
    Registered: Apr 2004
    Location: London
    Having burned out a bit on big, scripted, narrative-heavy games, I reverted back to Dwarf Fortress recently.
    My first attempt unfortunately fell after a couple of years thanks to a gods-be-damned actual DRAGON attack. Somewhat surprisingly, I think I've only ever seen one dragon in DF before, and that was a long time into the life of whatever fortress I was running at the time, so it quickly got smeared into raspberry jam by hardened veterans.
    This dragon melted everyone. And I mean that literally. I had an alert list full of "Urist has been melted by Whatever-the-dragon's-name-was".

    But this current fort at the base of a volcano is going much smoother. I've just finished equipping my first squad with steel armour & weapons, and I'm starting to set up entertainment for visitors.
    I'm also not dicking around with quantum stockpiles this time, so it's a lot easier to troubleshoot when there's a general work stoppage.

    DF's still the best, most creative simulation and colony management game in existence.

  18. #93
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2002
    Location: Edmonton
    Quote Originally Posted by Sulphur View Post
    What's wrong with the idea? I've always been fascinated with the idea of video games and the people who play them making a mutual assumption that the protagonist is the player, that a player by default embodies the character they control, and the video game reinforces that at every turn. Bioshock's a fun little turn on the idea that this provides you, the player, with anything like agency, but it does eviscerate its own point after it bashes it into Ryan's skull.

    Or is it the critique of objectivism, which devolves into a very unsubtle tale of autocracy vs. collectivism when you take a step back and look at it and its sequel together?
    The idea of a libertarian paradise at the bottom of the ocean is interesting, and the golf club scene is still good, but Bioshock had to make so many other compromises in service of gameplay accessibility that it's hard to take seriously as a piece of art. At every turn I could feel the design-by-committee influence, which somehow was much easier to ignore back in 2007, when everyone else complained about it and I defended it.

    Why present a dramatic choice about saving or harvesting little sisters when the moral choice is also the tactical one? Why are there ammo machines next to every Circus of Value? And why did Fontaine produce cute commercials that show his customers torching the police and their neighbours? It's like a war broke out and they decided to call in the graphic design team.

    Bioshock feels like a group of talented people came up with a bunch of cool ideas that made less and less sense with each iteration, as the project became more and more beholden to mass-audience appeal. And I think I'd be able to ignore all of that if the core gameplay was fun, but enemies barely react to your fire except for blood splatters, which makes the gunplay feel flimsy and tedious, real bullet-spongey, and the plasmids are mostly superfluous. So once I got past the Andrew Ryan scene, I was quite ready to call it quits. A Bioshock that hewed more closely to its RPG roots and focused on survival and exploration over flabby combat would be a lot more to my taste.

    Yeah I dunno. I liked TR 2013 when it came out, but in retrospect that was mostly the graphics razzle-dazzle. It's a muddled game and trilogy, and Lara Croft: First Blood is an interesting direction, but it's hefted with all the nuance of a sledgehammer, and the sheer amount of combat while you're supposed to be playing a vulnerable, fledgling Lara who's somehow only psychologically scarred in cutscenes... it's a schizophrenic mix. This is easier to ignore in Uncharted, because you can internalise that Drake's possibly just a psychopath underneath the quips and charisma, but also because Uncharted's tone is much breezier, and the action movie pacing makes it a fun ride. The new TR trilogy always makes me go, 'Okay, so you want me to take her seriously', but then instead of exploring Lara's frame of mind, it just piles into its mess of skill trees and crafting loops while moving its plot through a series of motions designed to funnel set pieces in and handwave any real development for her. It just doesn't hold together in the end, which is a shame because I could see the combat reinforcing the fun situated in a different context in a different game, or the story being more interesting in a game trilogy filled with actual exploration and tomb raiding.
    I can't really disagree except I think the shooting parts are more fun than the tomb raids (and really are on par with Uncharted in terms of how the guns feel and enemies react), and I've been finding the story easy enough to not be bothered by but not so ignorable that I skip the cutscenes. Like I said, I'm playing it before bed, and it's pleasantly satisfying and sleepifying. I know it's a bit of a cop-out to say that I just don't care about the game's problems, but I was specifically looking for a shut-off-my-brain experience, and this turned out to be it. If it was 2013 and I was excited for the next big entry in the beloved franchise, maybe I'd have been disappointed. Anyway, got the remasters coming out this month so I can reacquaint myself with real tomb raiding.

    RE: Horizon Zero Dawn, I dunno what the itch might be, but it's definitely not the same thing a Tomb Raider does.
    They're not the same genre, but they're both big-budget hand-holdey games that smack an objective marker in the middle of the screen, and you beeline it. Not usually my thing, but sometimes it's nice to unwind with. I mean, yes, HZD is open world, but so far I haven't felt compelled to explore in the same way I did for Breath of the Wild. I go where I'm told, and wherever I'm told to go there's machines to clear out, bandits to clear out, conversation trees to button through. I finally hit Meridian, so maybe it opens up after this. I really want to like this game, but it hasn't hooked me. I haven't found any really interesting environmental details, the weapons are mostly a variation on arrows, and the inventory system is so complex that I've pretty much ignored it. I like Aloy, though. I've heard people talk about the backstory being a large part of the appeal, so maybe I need to start paying closer attention to it.

  19. #94
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Quote Originally Posted by Aja View Post
    The idea of a libertarian paradise at the bottom of the ocean is interesting, and the golf club scene is still good, but Bioshock had to make so many other compromises in service of gameplay accessibility that it's hard to take seriously as a piece of art. At every turn I could feel the design-by-committee influence, which somehow was much easier to ignore back in 2007, when everyone else complained about it and I defended it.
    I'm not sure about the design by committee thing so much as it's a wholesale lifting/refiguring of SS2 into the console space. It's a decent argument to be had: if few people in your target demo have played SS2, what do you want to bring to the table from it when you're working in a space that requires compromises at both the technical and interface level for accessibility? I'm sure we can agree that the compromises weren't great, though I see why they had to happen.

    Why present a dramatic choice about saving or harvesting little sisters when the moral choice is also the tactical one? Why are there ammo machines next to every Circus of Value? And why did Fontaine produce cute commercials that show his customers torching the police and their neighbours? It's like a war broke out and they decided to call in the graphic design team.
    Not sure how that tracks. Saving the little sisters isn't a tactical choice so much as it is meaningless, because the game still gives you rewards for it in regular bursts, vs. harvesting them for an immediate payoff in power. This wasn't immediately apparent in the beginning, of course, so that meant your choice was possibly predicated on a moral reason at least initially.

    As for the rest, I'm assuming it's a depiction of Ryan's initial core objectivist philosophy rotted through by his psyche, which was rapidly devolving into libertarian insanity fed by a need for control to the exclusion of individual morality. Part of libertarian free market thinking is that the public decides what thrives and doesn't in aggregate, including what's ethical and isn't, right? Any external regulation like police or governments deciding what should and shouldn't go is ideally verboten, so those cartoons are taking that to the obvious logical conclusion, which is of course serving as a parody/satire of the entire thing as the game's subtext. Subtlety clearly doesn't exist here.

    Bioshock feels like a group of talented people came up with a bunch of cool ideas that made less and less sense with each iteration, as the project became more and more beholden to mass-audience appeal. And I think I'd be able to ignore all of that if the core gameplay was fun, but enemies barely react to your fire except for blood splatters, which makes the gunplay feel flimsy and tedious, real bullet-spongey, and the plasmids are mostly superfluous. So once I got past the Andrew Ryan scene, I was quite ready to call it quits. A Bioshock that hewed more closely to its RPG roots and focused on survival and exploration over flabby combat would be a lot more to my taste.
    Yeah, I have to agree with that. The gameplay was squidgy and unfun for the most part. Interestingly enough, Bioshock 2 did better on this front, to the point where I'd say they made the shooting bits nice enough to play through.

    I can't really disagree except I think the shooting parts are more fun than the tomb raids (and really are on par with Uncharted in terms of how the guns feel and enemies react), and I've been finding the story easy enough to not be bothered by but not so ignorable that I skip the cutscenes.
    TR 2013 wasn't great for any of the tomb raiding, no. You might find that when they introduced actual puzzle tombs in RotTR and slightly more involved ones in SotTR, those quickly became the more fun parts of those games. They were for me, at least.

    They're not the same genre, but they're both big-budget hand-holdey games that smack an objective marker in the middle of the screen, and you beeline it. Not usually my thing, but sometimes it's nice to unwind with. I mean, yes, HZD is open world, but so far I haven't felt compelled to explore in the same way I did for Breath of the Wild. I go where I'm told, and wherever I'm told to go there's machines to clear out, bandits to clear out, conversation trees to button through. I finally hit Meridian, so maybe it opens up after this. I really want to like this game, but it hasn't hooked me. I haven't found any really interesting environmental details, the weapons are mostly a variation on arrows, and the inventory system is so complex that I've pretty much ignored it. I like Aloy, though. I've heard people talk about the backstory being a large part of the appeal, so maybe I need to start paying closer attention to it.
    Yeah, Meridian is where it opens out. Even then, for what it's worth, it's never going to be BotW, so your expectations are on the money; it's always going to be a guided experience, though if you do go collectible hunting, that's where the backstory is. While it's never particularly ingenious in terms of puzzling out how to get a collectible, I found that the reward of learning a little bit more about what happened was good enough for me. And it's written decently enough, given that John Gonzalez, who was the lead writer on FO:NV, led the writing here ('Narrative Director' was his official title).

    The combat has a bunch of synergies that work well, with the rock-paper-scissors elemental weaknesses and resistances in tow, alongside your traps and other items. There's stealth-lite, environmental traps, different machine behaviours, different weak spots per machine, all of which you can bring to bear in many encounters. It's pretty accessible yet also a decent challenge as you go on (I played on Hard), and I found it a good mix of smacking shit around, progressing the story, and looking around for lore. It's a Skinner Box, like most games deploy, but a decently put together one.

  20. #95
    Member
    Registered: May 2004
    Quote Originally Posted by Sulphur View Post
    so those cartoons are taking that to the obvious logical conclusion, which is of course serving as a parody/satire of the entire thing as the game's subtext. Subtlety clearly doesn't exist here.
    Ah, yes, the Garth Marenghi school of writing...


  21. #96
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    I just finished The Last Clockwinder, a good example of what VR games can be if they're designed for the medium. It's also the VR game I've played that does throwing best... but that's not saying much. If, like me, you suck at throwing and catching, the game can be frustrating - but it's designed so that you can be at the lower end of mediocre and still get through it. (Nonetheless, on the whole I prefer puzzle games where dexterity comes second to having a good idea.)

    But it never gets old to look at a team of robot clones repeating the moves you've just done in order to program them. Makes me wish you were able to play Björk's "Army of Me" while looking at your, well, army of me.

  22. #97
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    So I got to Tunic's first ending, the 'bad' one. It's been a great ride, honestly. The layers to its design are provocative enough to keep trying to suss out all the nooks and crannies you glossed over hours earlier because they seemed unimportant, and it's not hard enough in combat except for a few trouble spots (that really began to grate because they were unnecessarily punishing, but nothing pushed me to turn on damage reduction, except the final fight which made me lose patience to get past its phase 2 irritations). I think there's more than a bit of Fez in how it wants you to unravel things, and there's some Dark Souls, but really a lot of it is Zelda in the design. I enjoyed it, and yes, to reiterate what I said earlier, the core mechanic to this game is in fact information. That'll be spoiler-y, so once I'm done with the meta-puzzle good ending hunt (I'm not above walkthroughs for this one), I'll post up some final thoughts. Probably. Maybe.

  23. #98
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: the Sheeple Pen
    I'm done with Horace. What a brilliant game! The actual gameplay may be quite ordinary (the gravity boots are a lot of fun though!) but it's the story that really makes this game so special. Having finished Horace three times now, I can safely say that it's up there with my all-time favourite games.

    I wanted to try something totally different next, so I started Wolfenstein: Youngblood, after someone in here recommended it not too long ago. It's alright, even when playing solo, although the game is obviously designed for co-op multiplayer. The gameplay is similar to the other new Wolfenstein games, it's very smooth and fast, but there's also less story and more action... which is a good thing in this case, I think. The NPCs are again annoying caricatures with silly exaggerated accents in true Wolfenstein fashion. I've never found the dieselpunk stuff particularly interesting - I prefer the occult nazis of The Old Blood (or Return to Castle Wolfenstein) - but I suppose it fits in the alternate 1980's timeline.

  24. #99
    Quote Originally Posted by Sulphur View Post
    That'll be spoiler-y, so once I'm done with the meta-puzzle good ending hunt (I'm not above walkthroughs for this one), I'll post up some final thoughts. Probably. Maybe.
    After getting the bad ending I first looked up what had to be done for the good ending, then I looked up the actual steps, then I went to watch a video of someone doing the last couple of steps + the good ending and called it a day. Having to use the Holy Cross 50 something times in a specific pattern (with one wrong step requiring a restart of the entire pattern) was too much for me.

  25. #100
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2024
    Location: Egyptian Afterlife
    Beyond Boulder Dome, a mod for Fallout New Vegas.

    Do yourself a favor and avoid the NCR quest as there is a bug later in the mod, side with the BoS instead, in order to complete the game, there are more quests after the apparent ending (don't worry about your faction status, is not affected in the main game).

    The start is a bit of a let down, but after that it gets really good.

    I seem to be stuck in the 2010s i know.

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