TTLG|Jukebox|Thief|Bioshock|System Shock|Deus Ex|Mobile
Page 5 of 10 FirstFirst 123456789 ... LastLast
Results 101 to 125 of 241

Thread: What are you playing? (2024 Edition)

  1. #101
    Member
    Registered: May 2005
    Quote Originally Posted by Aja View Post
    I've been playing the demo for Dreamcore, which sounds like a TikTok shovelware game but is actually an interesting and immersive walking sim with pretty stunning visuals. I knew about liminal spaces, but I had no idea there was a whole community devoted to them, with a wiki that describes hundreds of fictional liminal locations.
    Oh, nice. I enioyed watching the Return to Render backrooms videos on YouTube last year. This looks like a videogame with similar environments and less cartoony visuals.

  2. #102
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    There's also a game version of Backrooms and there's Interior Worlds in this liminal space genre.
    I've been playing IW recently, or I guess the demo.
    Edit: Sorry, getting my wires crossed. Dreamcore is the one with the demo I played.
    IW has you taking camera snapshots of liminal areas, and it's in a retro low res style.

    I think I'm on Observation Duty is also going to be in this vein.
    In that one you're looking at these liminal spaces through security cameras.

    The genre is definitely having a moment, and it's even starting to get a little oversaturated.

    I think the photorealism of Unreal Engine 5 is pushing it.
    When you start building in that engine, it's almost irresistible to make a realistic space with some surreal or liminal twist to it.

  3. #103
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Quote Originally Posted by WingedKagouti View Post
    After getting the bad ending I first looked up what had to be done for the good ending, then I looked up the actual steps, then I went to watch a video of someone doing the last couple of steps + the good ending and called it a day. Having to use the Holy Cross 50 something times in a specific pattern (with one wrong step requiring a restart of the entire pattern) was too much for me.
    It's not that bad exactly, since I have all but three manual pages. You have to do 10 fairy locations instead of all 20, so it's manageable, but also the actual puzzles seem somewhat obtuse, a bit more than Fez? Ah well, thank god for walkthroughs.

  4. #104
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2002
    Location: Edmonton
    Quote Originally Posted by Sulphur View Post
    Not sure how that tracks. Saving the little sisters isn't a tactical choice so much as it is meaningless, because the game still gives you rewards for it in regular bursts, vs. harvesting them for an immediate payoff in power. This wasn't immediately apparent in the beginning, of course, so that meant your choice was possibly predicated on a moral reason at least initially.
    True! It felt like something initially. It's a bit of a rug-pull though, and there's no reason why they couldn't have made the evil path the easier one, only now you have to be able to live with what you've done. I think what bothered me more was just the concept of the little sisters in general. Levine at one point said that they were originally designed as slugs, which makes more sense in an underwater world but is less marketable, so okay, they juiced it up, made it controversial, but they didn't fully commit to the bit, and for me the end result feels goofy. Like, I'm embarrassed to play this game when my wife is around. "I'm ready for dream time, Mr. Bubbles!"

    As for the rest, I'm assuming it's a depiction of Ryan's initial core objectivist philosophy rotted through by his psyche, which was rapidly devolving into libertarian insanity fed by a need for control to the exclusion of individual morality. Part of libertarian free market thinking is that the public decides what thrives and doesn't in aggregate, including what's ethical and isn't, right? Any external regulation like police or governments deciding what should and shouldn't go is ideally verboten, so those cartoons are taking that to the obvious logical conclusion, which is of course serving as a parody/satire of the entire thing as the game's subtext. Subtlety clearly doesn't exist here.
    I SUPPOSE! I wish they would've shown more of actual daily life in Rapture, which would've made its downfall more poignant. Like, we're going to see a show at Fort Frolic, and oh, did you happen to notice a weapon shop opened on the promenade? I know Mr. Ryan wants to protect our individual rights and all, but I don't know if I'm comfortable with violence! Etc. We got a little bit of this in the Infinite DLC.

    Yeah, Meridian is where it opens out. Even then, for what it's worth, it's never going to be BotW, so your expectations are on the money; it's always going to be a guided experience, though if you do go collectible hunting, that's where the backstory is. While it's never particularly ingenious in terms of puzzling out how to get a collectible, I found that the reward of learning a little bit more about what happened was good enough for me. And it's written decently enough, given that John Gonzalez, who was the lead writer on FO:NV, led the writing here ('Narrative Director' was his official title).

    The combat has a bunch of synergies that work well, with the rock-paper-scissors elemental weaknesses and resistances in tow, alongside your traps and other items. There's stealth-lite, environmental traps, different machine behaviours, different weak spots per machine, all of which you can bring to bear in many encounters. It's pretty accessible yet also a decent challenge as you go on (I played on Hard), and I found it a good mix of smacking shit around, progressing the story, and looking around for lore. It's a Skinner Box, like most games deploy, but a decently put together one.
    Being the silly person I am, I bought this game on PC and PS5, and I realized I can stream to Steam Deck from the Playstation using remote play. Apart from a tiny bit of lag and macroblocking, it feels way better to play it that way, at 60 FPS, versus native, where it stutters even on low settings. So I'm giving a solid go! I think it's starting to click, too. It does feel a little Skinner Boxy I guess, but it's also obvious they've put a lot of effort into story and worldbuilding, so I'm going to try to pay closer attention.

  5. #105
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Finished Demon's Souls Remake. At only ~30h this game feels positively slender compared to the later souls games, Elden Ring especially. It also has a few good grinding spots, which makes it easy to level up should you ever get stuck. I think it's a really good introduction to Souls games actually. As for how the remake is, afaik it plays the same as the original. On the technical side, it runs great and looks polished, but I do still prefer the more bleak, depressing look of the original.

  6. #106
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Maupertuis
    Demon's Souls is also the only Souls game where Miyazaki designed all the levels. The story goes that he had designed some of them before even getting his initial job at From Software! So for level design at least, Demon's Souls is his purest vision.

    After my usual manic bouncing among a dozen games, I've settled on three. The first, Jupiter Hell, is consummately balanced. It's a classical roguelike (so, turn-and tile-based with no meta-progression) with a focus on ranged combat. As I recall, Kornel made the excellent DoomRL in response to assertions that roguelikes could not do ranged combat well. After DoomRL went through many versions, he rightly decided he'd like to make money from his game design, and made Jupiter Hell. I tried the release version a couple years ago, which felt incomplete, but eight major versions later it feels complete. Its difficulties are so well tuned that, even when you can reliably beat one difficulty level, you'll still have difficulty making it out of the first area on the difficulty next higher. I may make a thread about this if it continues to hold my attention.

    Loop Hero, on the other hand... is not so well-balanced. It's a deck-building game where you lay down buildings and terrain while your character loops on a fixed road and accrues levels and treasure based on your tile placement, attempting to grow strong enough to handle the boss. Runs either die early or reach a state where they can continue indefinitely... so of course the game institutes a resource cap on each run, forcing you to start again. Meanwhile, the improvements you gain from the base-building layer are miniscule. The core idea is compelling enough for me to keep playing, but I won't be sad when my attention wanders.

    Opposite to Loop Hero, there's Gunfire Reborn, a furry roguelite FPS I picked up to play with a friend. (Ah, such a golden age we live in, where all genres are adjectives rather than nouns.) You choose at each step between three upgrades, typically two or three minor ones and one major one per stage. Its balancing is gonzo, the opposite of Loop Hero's stinginess. It is entirely willing to let you create a broken character: my first victory one-shotted the final form of the final boss. Its gunplay, animations and UX are solid, with its graphics aimed at the PS2 level, not a target you usually see. The components of its levels are all hand-designed, which I consider a must for FPS games. Its biggest downside is lack of stage variety; it wants to be a long-term game, but doesn't have enough variety to do so.

    It also lets you play as a foxgirl obsessed with fire, which this female vulpine plasma physicist appreciates.

  7. #107
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Quote Originally Posted by Aja View Post
    True! It felt like something initially. It's a bit of a rug-pull though, and there's no reason why they couldn't have made the evil path the easier one, only now you have to be able to live with what you've done. I think what bothered me more was just the concept of the little sisters in general. Levine at one point said that they were originally designed as slugs, which makes more sense in an underwater world but is less marketable, so okay, they juiced it up, made it controversial, but they didn't fully commit to the bit, and for me the end result feels goofy. Like, I'm embarrassed to play this game when my wife is around. "I'm ready for dream time, Mr. Bubbles!"
    It certainly is fairly random that it had to be little girls, at least from the perspective of someone playing it. I imagine as designers they went, 'so what's going to be the quickest, most visceral way to make people feel emotionally conflicted about this resourcing choice? Aha, children!' And yeah, the design and execution is pretty kitsch. I know I didn't really care, but the idea of being responsible for something that icky made me baulk, even if it's a video game... so they won out, in the end.

    I really liked the Infinite DLC, by the way, even though its smaller scope magnified the flaws in Levine's hyper-focused and narrow design-narrative philosophy.

    Being the silly person I am, I bought this game on PC and PS5, and I realized I can stream to Steam Deck from the Playstation using remote play. Apart from a tiny bit of lag and macroblocking, it feels way better to play it that way, at 60 FPS, versus native, where it stutters even on low settings. So I'm giving a solid go! I think it's starting to click, too. It does feel a little Skinner Boxy I guess, but it's also obvious they've put a lot of effort into story and worldbuilding, so I'm going to try to pay closer attention.
    That's pretty smart. The PC port for HZD was no great shakes, but they fixed it eventually, though the Linux layer you'd have to force it through is probably still not doing it any favours. The PS5 version's pretty great, bested only if you have superior PC hardware.

  8. #108
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: the Sheeple Pen
    I think I'm giving up on Wolfenstein: Newblood. Seems like I'm mostly visiting the same few maps and killing the same nazis over and over again, which is fine for a multiplayer game I guess, but it's not particularly interesting when you're playing solo. The gameplay is alright, even though I dislike the bullet-sponge enemies. I doubt that I'll get back to this game.

    In the meantime I played and already finished The Last Case of Benedict Fox on the Xbox. I've come to realise that metroidvanias may be my favourite genre nowadays, even though something about the word "metroidvania" irritates me. So, The Last Case of Benedict Fox is a metroidvania with strong Cthulhu/Lovecraftian vibes and a pretty cool Burtonesque art style. The first couple of hours in the game are the best, when everything feels so weird and exciting, and you've got lots of places to explore and mysteries to solve. Then you'll get used to all the weirdness and the mysteries don't feel that mysterious anymore. Luckily it's a fairly short game, so it's over before the boredom kicks in. Gotta say that there are some rather satisfying puzzles to solve though. The action gameplay is barely mediocre and doesn't always feel very smooth. Most enemies in the game can be defeated with just mashing the X button even in normal difficulty. Still, it's a decent game and worth checking out if the genre and the theme are your thing.

  9. #109
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Maupertuis
    Quote Originally Posted by Tomi View Post
    In the meantime I played and already finished The Last Case of Benedict Fox on the Xbox.
    Who is not, as a matter of fact, a fox.

    I think metroidvanias are great too, but the genre is fruitful enough that I can't keep up with it. But it's nice that, when the mood for a metroidvania arises, I can always find a good one either untouched in my library or on sale.

    Also, my opinion on nomenclature is that annoying people is a good thing. Nomenclature should be chaotic, because that chaos expresses the ability of art to defy systematization. Metroidvania.

  10. #110
    Tekken 8. It's Tekken, if you liked any of the previous Tekken games you'll probably like 8. The new player help this time around is Special Style which gives access to a limited moveset (including a basic combo) specific to each character using simplified inputs. It's mostly useful for Story Mode and Character Stories (or just trying out a new character) though it can be used online, but good players will know how to punish the generally predictable moves.

    Single player content (on top of vs CPU and practice):
    Story mode - Roughly 5 hours worth, but it doesn't rush through things, nor does it waste time.
    Character stories - Equivalent to Arcade mode in previous games with a CGI ending for each character.
    Arcade Quest - Essentially an extended tutorial
    Tekken Ball - Available against CPU, local players or online
    Super Ghost Mode - Similar to Treasure Battle in 6 & 7, but using playstyle data from other players (who have agreed to share this data)

  11. #111
    PC Gamering Smartey Man
    I <3 consoles and gamepads

    Registered: Aug 2007
    Location: New Zealand
    Played a bit of the Skull and Bones open beta. Never mind the connectivity issues and bugs, the game is as boring AF and so thoroughly mediocre. They probably would've cancelled this mega bore about a decade ago if the Singaporean government hadn't have invested in it.

    I imagine that the teething issues with bugs and connectivity will be fixed, but this game is out in less than like a week and has been in development for about a decade. They won't be turning this ship around at this point.

    It's a modern Western game so of course the female characters are ugly AF by design. Certainly a far cry from the Ubisoft as late as 2015, who were not scared shitless by some cat ladies with brain worms.




    (Washed out look due to HDR being on.)

  12. #112
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2002
    Location: Edmonton
    It is perplexing that developers don't consult EvaUnit02 when designing their female characters.

  13. #113
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    Ah yes, the Evaunit school of design where if they don't have massive boobs spilling out of their tight blouses and don't have their panties showing below their miniskirts while begging to be dominated by the player, they're ugly AF woke wankshite.

  14. #114
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere
    C'mon, surely they are just doing it for brand awareness now.

  15. #115
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    Modern characters fail to pass the EvaUnit "Boner test" - Game industry in shambles

  16. #116
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Incidentally, I wanted to talk about a cool thing I figured out in Chants of Sennaar for the Anchorite language. (I'm posting it here because I think this is the only place we've really talked about the game in any detail.) I don't think this is really too much of a spoiler -- in the sense that if you can crack anything from this post, then you're already basically playing the game as it's intended anyway -- [edit: except for the bottom spoiler which I edited in later, which I think is a proper spoiler] but if you want to go into the game fresh, which I'd even recommend, then you ought to stop reading, play the game, and then you can come back to this. But I'll spoiler tag it anyway.

    So, anyway, I was looking at the Anchorite language (here is a screenshot of its glyphs without the meanings) and thinking I know I've seen something like this before. And then it struck me. They're very much like the glyphs in this puzzle, which is something I originally saw in Japanese, and then I had to invent an English version on my own and create my own glyphs for it just so other English-speaking people could also try to solve the puzzle.

    And not only are they very similar. This is BTW a big hint about the language, short of just saying it... My puzzle glyphs ended up being very close to the game's for basically the same (kind of) reason. And what's really interesting about it is that, once you get the basic concept and try to create glyphs for it, which you can see both I and the creator of CoS did--and you can try to solve the puzzle as I created it and play the game and see what concept they share--you quickly realize that you are pretty restricted in how you can manifest that concept. So I could see right away that the creator of this game came to almost exactly the same kind of glyphs that I was creating for that puzzle because the concept basically paints you into that corner. It's hard to do it any other way except to make these kinds of glyphs.

    What I mean is, I don't think he saw that puzzle before. I think he had the same basic concept that that original puzzle-creator had, and that I had recreating it in English, which led all of us to create the same basic type of glyphs. It's like convergent evolution. Different people independently coming to the same structure for the same reason.

    Anyway, it was a very cool moment for me the instant I saw the Anchorite glyphs, it reminded me of the glyphs I made for that puzzle, and right away I bet that the concept behind that puzzle was the same trick this language was doing. And then it turned out I was right! It was doing very close to the same thing, so its glyphs looked like mine for basically the same reason.


    Well that was a cool revelation that I wanted to share that anyone who's played the game should be able to appreciate, even if it takes a bit of thinking through some puzzles to fully appreciate what I mean.

    Edit: To basically explain the concept explicitly though, and this is a proper spoiler giving away the puzzle and the game language, they both use negative space, where missing pieces of new glyphs fill in the negative space of the presented glyphs. In the case of the puzzle, the negative space glyphs replaces the presented ones, and in the game, the negative space glyphs combine with the presented ones to create a mixed glyph that combines their meanings. But aside from that difference, I think it's basically the same concept, and I guessed it the second I saw them.
    Last edited by demagogue; 19th Feb 2024 at 09:06.

  17. #117
    Level 10,000 achieved
    Registered: Mar 2001
    Location: Finland
    I have DONE IT. I have finished DISCO ELYSIUM! Wrapped up the case nice n neat. Only a few people got killed. The villain known as Cuno remains at large. But I made some friends along the way. Also made some startling discoveries about the world and myself. Had some laughs. Damn what a good game.

  18. #118
    Member
    Registered: Apr 2001
    Location: Switzerland
    So very glad you liked the game, since this means that I can continue talking to you.

  19. #119
    Thing What Kicks
    Registered: Apr 2004
    Location: London
    I've been pouring a lot of time into Dwarf Fortress recently. It still has the ability to make hours pass like minutes.
    My current fortress did seem to be on the verge of "General Strike" complaxity, where the amount of jobs starts to overwhelm the maximum population of 200 dwarves, but I seem to have pulled it from the brink by trimming my list of Orders (the logic that automates the running of a fortress) and by hard-assigning dwarves to certain tasks.
    It's a fortress built around a volcano with a thriving steel industry, 40 hardened veterans equipped with said steel, a moat that freezes in the winter which I am attempting to prevent happening by adding underfloor heating (a lava moat underneath the water one), a resident monarch whose quarters are furnished in masterwork crafted gold furniture and an underground amphibian man capture workflow in order to provide live targets for my crossbow dwarves.

    I've also been dipping in and out of Sleeping Dogs again, thanks to the excellent "The Brothers Sun" on Netflix.
    It's still probably my favourite GTA-alike (outside of RDR2). It's aged pretty well too, although the character models are showing their age. Even then though, facial animations are great, and the in-game cutscenes really help sell the story.

    And I've also been twatting dinosaurs about the noggin with a big hammer again in Monster Hunter World, which is great for those times when you just want to drop in for some quick action.
    The interlocking systems hold up well enough that each expedition ends up feeling unique. The story is less compelling, and at high levels, is a real chore playing solo. I just took down the ape-like Rajan, and that just wasn't a fair or fun fight solo. I could probably have done better with a different weapon. But due to the way MHW handles gear, you're probably going to specialise in one or two weapons only, and gear that complements those weapons. Otherwise, it gets ridiculously grindy, more so than usual.
    And that's the problem I have with a lot of games that rely on gear and specialisation without offering free re-specs. It makes it that much harder to learn and adopt a new playstyle should the rug be pulled out from under your feet.
    In essence, if you're going to introduce gameplay elements that invalidate the playstyle of some of your players, make it easy for them to switch to a new one.
    The other issue is that while I'd love to play this with the usual TTLG co-op crew, much like other games with egregious levelling and gear (See: The Division, Destiny2, Diablo 3, etc.), the power difference would make it trivial and boring for all involved if I played at a lower level, and frustrating & daunting to have lower level characters play at my level.
    I think there's massive problems with levels and gear score in games that are primarily co-op unless they're quick and easy to cap out. Not just from a casual enjoyment perspective; at their heart, these systems are FOMO and create an uneasy, low level competetiveness that can in the worst cases be tuned to drive people towrds microtransactions.
    Mind you, MHW doesn't seem to care if you use Cheat Engine to bolster its numerous currencies, unlike a lot of the worst offenders. That can help eliminate the grind.

  20. #120
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: the Sheeple Pen
    I've been playing EA Sports WRC quite a bit lately. So far I haven't even tried the career mode which is something that I've really been looking forward to. But in fact when I first started playing WRC, the game actually advised against playing the career mode because it's not fully functional yet. So I've been busy with the "Moments" game mode instead, where you race through more or less iconic stages from rallying history. Compared to all the other players, I seem to be pretty average - so much slower than the best drivers that it can be a bit discouraging at times, but also much faster than the worst drivers.

    The latest patches have fixed a lot of the performance issues, which is great, even though there are still some stages (particularly in the Mediterranean and Monte Carlo rally) that can get a bit laggy at times. But right now I can say that I'm enjoying this more than the Dirt Rally games. The stages feel more authentic, and I absolutely love the super long stages. The longest one that I've played so far was more than 32 kilometers! That's quite exhausting even when I'm sitting comfortably on my sofa and playing the game with my XBox controller, so I can only imagine how exhausting it'd be in real life.

    The driving model is somewhat more lenient than in Dirt Rally, but I'm okay with that. I found the first Dirt Rally in particular to be a bit too unforgiving at times. There are still more than enough ways to screw up in EA WRC, and it all feels realistic enough for me. The damage model is one thing that I'm a little disappointed about. You may lose a door or two and the bonnet of your car may fly off, but no matter how badly you crash your car, it never looks that badly damaged.

    Anyway, I'm really enjoying EA WRC at the moment! Jason Moyer, have you tried it yet?

  21. #121
    New Member
    Registered: Feb 2024
    I'm playing Loldle
    Last edited by anhd389; 6th Mar 2024 at 21:47.

  22. #122
    Member
    Registered: Jun 2003
    Location: Sweden
    Tried the demo for Outcast 2 (whatever the full title was).

    I remember the original Outcast, it was pretty cool for the time, not exactly the most memorable game for me personally, decent fun and and pretty groundbreaking when it came to the graphics.

    Didn't play the remake so i can't comment on that. I was hoping maybe this played similar to something like ELEX (which i enjoyed a lot). But no, nothing here resembles ELEX or a Bethesda title. This plays like a mixture of Ratchet and Clank and i guess like a more shitty third person version of Halo. There is no immersion to be found here. I do think there's an attempt at it because you can even dive under water, something you'd expect in games from Bethesda or in PB games, but no, very arcade-like gameplay where enemies dies in arrays or colors and items that shots off (very Ratchet and Clank-like or Nintendo like i guess).

    The colors are very vibrant, neon green grass, purple and pink trees. In some of the videos the game looks impressive because they captured it in the right angle at the right moment. In-game though, it looks like a rather amateurish indie game, Horizon it isn't. The art direction is plain bad, i understand what they're trying to do, but this type of very vibrant graphics requires a really talented team to pull it off, and they didn't.

    Seems like they've tried to mimic some popular games like Ratchet and Clank, Halo and the new Jedi Knight games perhaps, they fail miserably at it. The combat here is horrible, really really tedious. Controls are floaty. I hated the new Jedi Knight game but at least the combat and control there was much better, and in comparison to Horizon's really fun combat this is laughable.

    Garbage.

  23. #123
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2003
    Location: The Plateaux Of Mirror
    For a second I thought you were talking about Outlast, and I was getting really confused when you got to the bit about it being third person.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tomi View Post
    Jason Moyer, have you tried it yet?
    I have not. I'll probably give it a go whenever it gets massively discounted, as I would like to eventually check it out.

  24. #124
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2001
    Location: the Sheeple Pen
    Played the Dead Space remake on the XBox. It's an okay game I guess, but I had uninstalled about half a minute after the end credits had stopped rolling. The jump scares stop being scary after about one hour in, and even though there's lots of gore and the atmosphere remains oppressive throughout the game, it quickly loses its desired effect and becomes a bit boring. The story is very predictable and gets somewhat annoying towards the end. At least I can cross Dead Space off my list now.

    Next up, The Lies of P. Already started it today, and it seems to be about as Souls-like as I expected, in both good and bad. Mostly bad so far, I guess, but there's some good stuff too.

  25. #125
    Member
    Registered: Jul 2002
    Location: Edmonton
    I finished Act 1 of Pentiment and have been really impressed with it so far. I'm playing a theologian from the Low Countries with a strong interest in the occult, which allows me to spit scripture when I need to but also uncover darker mysteries. I thought I did okay in Act 1, thoroughly investigating (and ruling out) Ferenc and Mathilda, partially investigating Lucky, and not having time for the rest. I kinda felt like none of them were guilty, but when the archdeacon pressed me, I didn't have the option to equivocate, so I made my choice, and immediately an achievement popped up saying Got Lucky executed. :skull: So now I'm in Act II, roleplaying a man with a guilty conscience.

    Pentiment's art style has been rightly praised, but I haven't heard much about its sound design, which is equally excellent. I never tire of the pen scratching and page turning sounds, and the ambient noise (especially the rain sounds, that change depending on the building) and footsteps create such a natural atmosphere that it's pleasurable to just stop and listen.

Page 5 of 10 FirstFirst 123456789 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •