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Thread: AI generated music

  1. #1
    The Necromancer
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com

    AI generated music

    So it's finally here, an AI song generator that creates music from any prompt you enter.

    I created an ode to our beloved forum
    And the remix

    There's a tinge of autotune in there that I don't like, but otherwise I'm impressed

  2. #2
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere
    As a professional musician, this is fun to mess around with, but at the same time it is quite disturbing

  3. #3
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    I'd put up a thoughtful analysis on this, but I'm not in the mood, so: we already have an utter deluge of generic crap from people using similar tools on places like Spotify, now it's going to be a veritable flood of pap I won't even have the energy to sift through. I imagine the people who get lucky with it will claim the song is 'theirs' and then reap the short-term reward of that (how do copyrights work when an algorithm someone else created is creating something from a few lines of your input?), but as a tool for musicians who know how to put tracks together, this might be just another thing to use to make some parts of the process easier, other people lazier, but there's possibilities too, like using some of this shit as a sort of aural palimpsest.

    Also, I got too lazy to finish this post, so I had ChatGPT do it for me.


  4. #4
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere


    pretty chunky, but this is why music will possibly be the last bastion of non ai things.

  5. #5
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Okay, but for reference here:


  6. #6
    The Necromancer
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by Sulphur View Post
    I'd put up a thoughtful analysis on this, but I'm not in the mood, so: we already have an utter deluge of generic crap from people using similar tools on places like Spotify, now it's going to be a veritable flood of pap I won't even have the energy to sift through. I imagine the people who get lucky with it will claim the song is 'theirs' and then reap the short-term reward of that (how do copyrights work
    I will say this may not be a bad thing. Considering most of the popular music out there over the past 15 years or so has been engineered to sound the same, made increasingly superficial and uniform, same cheesy autotune in most songs, same 4 or 5 beats with little variation, I have no issue if this kills the pop music industry, seeing how it's already decadent - the deluge of crap has been flooding the industry for years. Most of the talented people (unless you're an established old timer) are in indie circles nowadays, and not making a living from their music. We're in the new Bubble-gum pop age. So if this automation of pop takes over, it may force real, talented artists to take more of a prominent role.

    I remember in the 90's up to the mid 2000's, how good music was everywhere, the variety was insane, and I'd get excited about the new stuff coming out. Sure we still had shitty pop, but well made music wasn't hard to come across. Today, it's few and far between. I don't even bother paying attention to the moedrn music scene anymore, there's plenty of gems to listen to from decades ago.

  7. #7
    Chakat sex pillow
    Registered: Sep 2006
    Location: not here
    I'm not the kind of person who cheers for the death of something, so I don't see why the route to making the industry better is killing it. I think you might be overly optimistic in envisioning a future where everyone's bored by engineered pop and turns to indie artists - a) it's not like that genre's going to be invulnerable to the propensities of AI songsmiths given enough time, and b) 'pop' means 'popular', so as long as people like music, it's never going to die.

    I also think you're wrong about good music being hard to come across. What's happened is that we've got a lot more music coming out now than before, and while that invariably means that you'll get exposed to a lot of crap because the volume makes that statistically more likely, there's also invariably a lot of good stuff out there too. Your exposure to it depends on the sources you use to curate; and that's far more important now than it used to be before because of that volume problem. While I don't listen to mainstream pop much, I've found plenty of artists in other genres to listen to over the past ten years plumbing the spectrum from shallow fried pop to complex and introspective and technically impressive.

  8. #8
    Member
    Registered: Sep 2001
    Location: The other Derry
    I agree that studio produced music is already formulaic crap. We're long past the heyday of big budget studio recordings producing statement albums that become the soundtracks for a generation. Same with movies and TV. The explosion of content started before AI, and along with social media it's helping to fracture society because we have few common cultural and media experiences to relate to each other through anymore. AI may make that worse, but it isn't going to kill music.

    Live music is where it's at. It's not about the tunes, it's about the performances and the events. I was just thinking about that last night when I had this on the TV while making dinner:



    That's the kind of musical experience that a community can share. Last month, my daughter and one of her best friends performed a Taylor Swift song together on piano and guitar for an ice cream social at her elementary school. Last year, I learned how to assemble and tune a drum kit for my son to get started playing. AI could never inspire me to do that, or inspire her music teacher to teach, or inspire my friend to make his own guitars.

    When I think about it, all of my best and most memorable musical experiences were live. My grandmother taking me to see the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra when I was a kid. My mother playing piano in our living room. Listening to the organ and choir at church. Moshing at a Mighty Mighty Bosstones show. Dressing like an idiot and singing drunk at Jimmy Buffett. Grateful Dead shows when Jerry was still alive. Introducing my wife to Genesis by getting front row seats for a recreation of the Lamb Lies Down on Broadway by The Musical Box using the original costumes, slide show, and period instruments including a real mellotron. Sitting at a cocktail table at Ronnie Scotts listening to Gary Burton, Antonio Sanchez, and Julian Lage blow me away, and then seeing my wife get giddy while talking to the band about the Berklee scene outside the bathrooms during a break. Bluegrass nights at the Cantab Lounge. Taking my kids to see the Nutcracker with a live orchestra. No way is AI going to replace that.

    This summer, we're taking them to Tanglewood. And man, I wish I had gotten tickets to see Phish at the Sphere. Holy shit!

  9. #9
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2024
    Location: Egyptian Afterlife
    I am partial to Schandmaul.


    Schandmaul is a German medieval folk rock band from the Munich area.

    As well as using modern instruments such as the bass and electric guitar, the band also utilizes instruments typically used in Medieval folk songs such as the bagpipes, hurdy-gurdy or shawm, to produce their trademark folk rock sound. Schandmaul was nominated two times for the Echo Music Prize and has so far had six albums in the top ten German album charts and three top-ten albums in Austria.

    The name 'Schandmaul' translates roughly to 'malicious tongue' or 'backbiter' and refers to their mascot of a grinning skeletal jester.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schandmaul


  10. #10
    Member
    Registered: Dec 2020
    Quote Originally Posted by PigLick View Post
    pretty chunky, but this is why music will possibly be the last bastion of non ai things.
    I think you're even giving AI too much credit. A lot of what ChatGPT appears to be good at might be largely based on cheats and prescripted responses which it then randomly fills in the blanks. So it's not purely the AI's work. Let me give an example: asking it for movie plots.

    Here's an experiment, the same prompt "write an outline for an original science fiction movie" several times asking for it to write an original movie plot. I'll show just the main character it came up with for each one

    https://chatgpt.com/share/e8d61d08-1...7-9a3ccfc8c60f

    "Dr. Elara Quinn, a brilliant astrophysicist and archeologist."

    (they discover an ancient alien artifact that's sending out signals)

    https://chatgpt.com/share/3689bfe2-1...5-df78a7d1c8a7

    "Captain Mira Thorne, and her crew aboard the starship Aurora."

    (they explore ancient alien ruins on a mysterious planet)

    https://chatgpt.com/share/bffb8848-a...e-9221fdf7b403

    Dr. Elena Reese, a brilliant but disillusioned archaeologist specializing in alien artifacts.

    ("Dr. Reese discovers a hidden chamber in an ancient alien ruin containing a mysterious artifact.")

    OK ... not a lot of variety there. Let's try asking "write an outline for an original action adventure movie"

    https://chatgpt.com/share/c5a01eee-8...0-3514c5bc543e

    Dr. Emily Carter: A brilliant and adventurous archaeologist known for her expertise in ancient civilizations.

    ("Emily discovers an ancient map leading to the "Serpentís Heart," a legendary artifact said to grant immense power."

    https://chatgpt.com/share/3bcec7eb-7...5-832a465995c9

    "Introduction of the protagonist, Dr. Elena Martinez, an archaeologist and adventurer."

    ... what's the deal with all these female scientists and archeologists, who always have a name beginning with "E"?

    How I believe this actually work is that they do prompt-specific training using sample texts they created. So when you marvel at how well ChatGPT is able to narrow down on what you're asking for: that's not AI, that's the programmers painstakingly detecting common requests then training it on preset responses, which it then varies the text around.

    In this case they all seem to have been Indiana Jones and Contact inspired plots, but with a female scientist with an English/European name started with "E", and ChatGPT's pattern matcher decided that was the important part.
    Last edited by Cipheron; 20th May 2024 at 06:51. Reason: Typos

  11. #11
    The Necromancer
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by Cipheron View Post

    ... what's the deal with all these female scientists and archeologists, who always have a name beginning with "E"?

    ...

    In this case they all seem to have been Indiana Jones and Contact inspired plots, but with a female scientist with an English/European name started with "E", and ChatGPT's pattern matcher decided that was the important part.
    Jurassic Park

  12. #12
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere
    Chat gpt is very poor for text variation, with stable diffusion I got a lot more diverse generations, only one with a female named Emily. But yeh there was a whole bunch of mass effect, halo kinda stuff.

  13. #13
    Member
    Registered: Aug 2002
    Location: Point Nemo
    AI generated music isn't all that new as the Japanese have been doing this for a few years now. It's all very Orwellian to me though. Eventually AI will decide what music will be created for public consumption. Radio stations have been using a basic form of AI which is just compiled statistical data to decide on formats and playlists because it's more profitable than having a human DJ create lists and shows. This give me an idea for a separate AI thread. Stay tuned folks, this show will return after a brief AI generated commercial....

  14. #14
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere
    If you are talking about vocaloid music that isnt really ai generated. It's more in the vein of using sequencers and trackers, it actually requires a fair bit of technical knowledge.

    and the ai commercials are already here, that was the point of the video i posted.

    the best quote from said video

    "for the ai techbros, music is just one more box to tick on their way to the ai singularity"
    Last edited by PigLick; 20th May 2024 at 11:25.

  15. #15
    The Necromancer
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Guaranteed this AI was trained on modern commercial music (like past decade). Even when I try and make it create something more classical or older, it always injects that millennial pop tinge or autotune in there

  16. #16
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere

  17. #17
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere
    unicorn chaser


  18. #18
    Moderator
    Registered: Jan 2003
    Location: NeoTokyo
    Quote Originally Posted by PigLick View Post
    Cheesy Delight
    1. I challenge anyone to find anything more soulless than this, but what I really want to know is...
    2. Did you know Red Lobster went bankrupt when you posted this, or is it just a nice coincidence?

  19. #19
    Member
    Registered: Feb 2001
    Location: Somewhere
    I found out about Red Lobster bankruptcy after, which I found quite amusing.

  20. #20
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2003
    Location: The Plateaux Of Mirror
    I've been messing with Suno for the last year or so, mostly making songs about squirrels because it's funny and stupid.


  21. #21
    The Necromancer
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by heywood View Post
    I agree that studio produced music is already formulaic crap. We're long past the heyday of big budget studio recordings producing statement albums that become the soundtracks for a generation. Same with movies and TV. The explosion of content started before AI, and along with social media it's helping to fracture society because we have few common cultural and media experiences to relate to each other through anymore.
    One of the reasons is the big record companies today, with the overavailability of things online and social media, are more averse to risk and novelty than in previous decades. So they'll choose the same formula that seems to be popular: autotune, short, catchy, superficial songs, same underlying beat, etc. Instead of giving unique or novel styles a chance like they used to. And yeah I did notice a shift into conformity around when social media too off (2008 or so).

    Also, thanks, to the internet, many artists think they have to conform and follow trends to be popular and go viral, instead of being unique. You even see it with veteran, established musicians, who used to have great music, and are now copying the current trends, because they're scared of losing relevance

  22. #22
    Member
    Registered: Jan 2024
    Location: Egyptian Afterlife
    Oh come on what's so bad about songs like a "Maserati" or a "Ferrari".
    I am totally being ironic of course. If you don't know them, is probably better for your mind sake.

  23. #23
    The Necromancer
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Last edited by Azaran; 23rd May 2024 at 15:35.

  24. #24
    Member
    Registered: Nov 2003
    Location: The Plateaux Of Mirror

  25. #25
    The Necromancer
    Registered: Aug 2009
    Location: thiefgold.com
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Moyer View Post
    LOL amazing, I hadn't seen the option to add lyrics

    An ode to a notorious ex member who must not be named

    Brudermurus redux

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